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88646-5-158-Louvre-Roman-Statue-Marsyas.jpg

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The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey). Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
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The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.