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Bardo-Roman-Jewish-Mosaic-449-4.tif

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6th century Inscription of the great hall of the synagogue of Nam-Ham-mam-Lif in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis, present day Tunisia. The mosaic floor of the vestibule (porticus) was an offering from Asterius son of Rusticus, the Head of the Jewish community who was working in the Naro jewellers trade. The mosaic reads in Latin "Asterius, filius Rustici, arcosinagogi, margaritari, (de d(onis) dei partemporticites-selavit". The Bardo National Museum, Tunis Tunisia. Against a black background.

The so called synagogue of Naro (Hammam-Lif, Tunisia), discovered in 1883, is a square buil-ding (20 by 20 m), consisting of several rooms and hallways communicating with an inner courtyard. The plan is inspired by traditional domestic architecture of Roman Africa. The room, dedicated to religious ceremonies, was paved with a magnificent mosaic of several figured panels with an iconography highlighting Judaeo-Christian concepts, attesting a proselyte attitude addressing a local Judaic community, who was very active between the late fifth c. and the early sixth century AD.
Copyright
© Paul E Williams 2016
Image Size
5423x4286 / 66.5MB
Contained in galleries
Bardo Museum Roman Mosaics Artefacts - Tunis, Bardo Museum - Roman Byzantine Early Christian Mosaics & Antiquity - Photos Images Pictures, Roman Mosaics | Roman Mosaic Pictures, Photos and Images. Fotos
6th century Inscription of the great hall of the synagogue of Nam-Ham-mam-Lif in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis, present day Tunisia. The mosaic floor of the vestibule (porticus) was an offering from Asterius son of Rusticus, the Head of the Jewish community who was working in the Naro jewellers trade. The mosaic reads in Latin  "Asterius, filius Rustici, arcosinagogi, margaritari, (de d(onis) dei partemporticites-selavit".  The Bardo National Museum, Tunis Tunisia.  Against a black background.<br />
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The so called synagogue of Naro (Hammam-Lif, Tunisia), discovered in 1883, is a square buil-ding (20 by 20 m), consisting of several rooms and hallways communicating with an inner courtyard. The plan is inspired by traditional domestic architecture of Roman Africa. The room, dedicated to religious ceremonies, was paved with a magnificent mosaic of several figured panels with an iconography highlighting Judaeo-Christian concepts, attesting a proselyte attitude addressing a local Judaic community, who was very active between the late fifth c. and the early sixth century AD.