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Ancient Egyptian cube block statue of Horemtabat, 660 BC, 25th Dynasty. Kunsthistorisches Muesum Vienna inv AS 9639. Granire height 32 cm width 15.8 cm.

The statue type of the cubic stool figure - also called cube stool - offers the advantage that the entire surface can be covered with inscriptions. This is also the case with the statue of the priest Anch-takelot. The front of the statue is divided into two parts by a relief Osiris figure. The inscriptions include a hymn to Osiris and the invocation of the priests of the Amun Temple to say prayers for the statue owner and to offer food and drink offerings. The statue of Anch-takelot was not placed in his tomb, but in a temple. The deceased hoped to be able to participate in the sacrifices made to the gods.

This block statue is one of the most recent acquisitions in the Egyptian collection, as well as the most valuable purchase for a long time. Its high quality and perfect preservation place this statue among the most important examples of sculpture from the first millennium BC. Characteristic for the Late Period are the bag-shaped headcovering and, in the outline of the body, the indication of the back, waist, and thighs of the cubic squatting figure. The style of the piece is typical for the period because it strikes a classical balance between realism and idealisation, and because of the smooth polish of its surface. The inscriptions on the front, on the sides of the pedestal, and on the back pillar are indicative of their date in both orthography and content, despite their use of old, sometimes ancient phraseology. The person represented is a "divine father", a high priestly rank, called Har-kheb, whose father was the prophet of Amun in Karnak Hor, and whose mother was the temple musician of Amun Isis-reshuti [Esershôt]. The name Har-kheb is a more or less phonetic rendering of Hor-em-akhbit, "Horus is in Khemmis". On the front of the statue is a version of the traditional "appeal to passers-by", but revised
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Copyright 2022 Paul E Williams all rights reserved. Property rights belong to the trustees of the Kunsthistorisches Muesum Vienna.
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Contained in galleries
Photos of Ancient Egyptian Art, Sculptures, Frescoes, Hieroglyphics, Museum of Art History - Kunsthistorisches - Ancient Egyptian Antiquities - Pictures Images photos, Ancient Egyptian Statues & Sculpture - Pictures Images Photos
Ancient Egyptian cube block statue of Horemtabat, 660 BC, 25th Dynasty.  Kunsthistorisches Muesum Vienna inv AS 9639. Granire height 32 cm width 15.8 cm. <br />
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The statue type of the cubic stool figure - also called cube stool - offers the advantage that the entire surface can be covered with inscriptions. This is also the case with the statue of the priest Anch-takelot. The front of the statue is divided into two parts by a relief Osiris figure. The inscriptions include a hymn to Osiris and the invocation of the priests of the Amun Temple to say prayers for the statue owner and to offer food and drink offerings. The statue of Anch-takelot was not placed in his tomb, but in a temple. The deceased hoped to be able to participate in the sacrifices made to the gods.<br />
<br />
This block statue is one of the most recent acquisitions in the Egyptian collection, as well as the most valuable purchase for a long time. Its high quality and perfect preservation place this statue among the most important examples of sculpture from the first millennium BC. Characteristic for the Late Period are the bag-shaped headcovering and, in the outline of the body, the indication of the back, waist, and thighs of the cubic squatting figure. The style of the piece is typical for the period because it strikes a classical balance between realism and idealisation, and because of the smooth polish of its surface. The inscriptions on the front, on the sides of the pedestal, and on the back pillar are indicative of their date in both orthography and content, despite their use of old, sometimes ancient phraseology. The person represented is a "divine father", a high priestly rank, called Har-kheb, whose father was the prophet of Amun in Karnak Hor, and whose mother was the temple musician of Amun Isis-reshuti [Esershôt]. The name Har-kheb is a more or less phonetic rendering of Hor-em-akhbit, "Horus is in Khemmis". On the front of the statue is a version of the traditional "appeal to passers-by", but revised