• Torso of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this period. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Full length tree quarter view of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this peiod. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Full length view of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso three quarter of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Full length side view of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this peiod. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • low full length view of the  Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso face on view of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Upper torso of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this peiod. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Full length face on view of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this peiod. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Sarcophagus of The Mourning Women, 4th cent. B.C Greek from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon , Chamber no I, Lebanon, Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 386T  Cat. Mendel 10.
  • Sarcophagus of The Mourning Women, 4th cent. B.C Greek from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon , Chamber no I, Lebanon, Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 386T  Cat. Mendel 10.
  • Sarcophagus of The Mourning Women, 4th cent. B.C Greek from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon , Chamber no I, Lebanon, Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 386T  Cat. Mendel 10.
  • Sarcophagus of The Mourning Women, 4th cent. B.C Greek from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon , Chamber no I, Lebanon, Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 386T  Cat. Mendel 10.
  • Sarcophagus of The Mourning Women, 4th cent. B.C Greek from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon , Chamber no I, Lebanon, Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 386T  Cat. Mendel 10.
  • Neolithic Marble Female Figurine grave offering of the early Cycladic II period from the Chalandriani, from Syros. 2800-2300BC. Athens Archaeological Museum Ref No 6169.
  • Neolithic Marble Female Figurine grave offering of the early Cycladic II period from the Chalandriani, from Syros. 2800-2300BC. Athens Archaeological Museum Ref No 6169.
  • Neolithic Marble Female Figurine grave offering of the early Cycladic II period from the Chalandriani, from Syros. 2800-2300BC. Athens Archaeological Museum Ref No 6169.
  • Neolithic Marble Female Figurine grave offering of the early Cycladic II period from the Chalandriani, from Syros. 2800-2300BC. Athens Archaeological Museum Ref No 6169.
  • Neolithic Marble Female Figurine grave offering of the early Cycladic II period from the Chalandriani, from Syros. 2800-2300BC. Athens Archaeological Museum Ref No 6169.
  • Large Sphinx of Naxos sitting on an Ionic column circa 560 B.C. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Large Sphinx of Naxos sitting on an Ionic column circa 560 B.C. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Large Sphinx of Naxos sitting on an Ionic column circa 560 B.C. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Large Sphinx of Naxos sitting on an Ionic column circa 560 B.C. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Large Sphinx of Naxos sitting on an Ionic column circa 560 B.C. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Large Sphinx of Naxos sitting on an Ionic column circa 560 B.C. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Large Sphinx of Naxos sitting on an Ionic column circa 560 B.C. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Large Sphinx of Naxos sitting on an Ionic column circa 560 B.C. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Large Sphinx of Naxos sitting on an Ionic column circa 560 B.C. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Large Sphinx of Naxos sitting on an Ionic column circa 560 B.C. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Large Sphinx of Naxos sitting on an Ionic column circa 560 B.C. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Large Sphinx of Naxos sitting on an Ionic column circa 560 B.C. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Kouros Statues of the Archaic Period. Early 6th c. B.C. (circa 580 B.C.)  Known as Kleovis and Biton, the two boys who heroically pulled their mother on her chariot to the sanctuary where she was to worship. They pulled the chariot for a distance of about 8km. They died the same night peacefully in their sleep according to Herodotus. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Large Sphinx of Naxos sitting on an Ionic column circa 560 B.C. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Large Sphinx of Naxos sitting on an Ionic column circa 560 B.C. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Large Sphinx of Naxos sitting on an Ionic column circa 560 B.C. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Large Sphinx of Naxos sitting on an Ionic column circa 560 B.C. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Large Sphinx of Naxos sitting on an Ionic column circa 560 B.C. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Large Sphinx of Naxos sitting on an Ionic column circa 560 B.C. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Large Sphinx of Naxos sitting on an Ionic column circa 560 B.C. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Large Sphinx of Naxos sitting on an Ionic column circa 560 B.C. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Kouros Statues of the Archaic Period. Early 6th c. B.C. (circa 580 B.C.)  Known as Kleovis and Biton, the two boys who heroically pulled their mother on her chariot to the sanctuary where she was to worship. They pulled the chariot for a distance of about 8km. They died the same night peacefully in their sleep according to Herodotus. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Kouros Statues of the Archaic Period. Early 6th c. B.C. (circa 580 B.C.)  Known as Kleovis and Biton, the two boys who heroically pulled their mother on her chariot to the sanctuary where she was to worship. They pulled the chariot for a distance of about 8km. They died the same night peacefully in their sleep according to Herodotus. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Kouros Statues of the Archaic Period. Early 6th c. B.C. (circa 580 B.C.)  Known as Kleovis and Biton, the two boys who heroically pulled their mother on her chariot to the sanctuary where she was to worship. They pulled the chariot for a distance of about 8km. They died the same night peacefully in their sleep according to Herodotus. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Kouros Statues of the Archaic Period. Early 6th c. B.C. (circa 580 B.C.)  Known as Kleovis and Biton, the two boys who heroically pulled their mother on her chariot to the sanctuary where she was to worship. They pulled the chariot for a distance of about 8km. They died the same night peacefully in their sleep according to Herodotus. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Alexander The Great ( Alexander III of Macedon) 4th Cent BC. Sarcophagus calved from Pentelic Marble from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon, Chamber no.III, Lebanon. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 370T Cat. Mendel 68
  • Alexander The Great ( Alexander III of Macedon) 4th Cent BC. Sarcophagus calved from Pentelic Marble from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon, Chamber no.III, Lebanon. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 370T Cat. Mendel 68
  • Alexander The Great ( Alexander III of Macedon) 4th Cent BC. Sarcophagus calved from Pentelic Marble from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon, Chamber no.III, Lebanon. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 370T Cat. Mendel 68
  • Alexander The Great ( Alexander III of Macedon) 4th Cent BC. Sarcophagus calved from Pentelic Marble from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon, Chamber no.III, Lebanon. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 370T Cat. Mendel 68
  • Alexander The Great ( Alexander III of Macedon) 4th Cent BC. Sarcophagus calved from Pentelic Marble from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon, Chamber no.III, Lebanon. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 370T Cat. Mendel 68
  • Roman statue of Asklepios. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology.
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Asclepius. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no .Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, one of his his daughters is Hygieia
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/196. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Modest Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Asklepios. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.  Against a grey background
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Dionysus. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Dionysus  is the god of the grape-harvest, winemaking and wine, of fertility, ritual madness, religious ecstasy, and theatre in ancient Greek religion and myth.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Asclepius. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no .Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, one of his his daughters is Hygieia
  • Roman statue of Asclepius. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no .Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, one of his his daughters is Hygieia
  • Roman statue of Asclepius. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no .Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, one of his his daughters is Hygieia
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/196. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/196. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/196. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Modest Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery. Against a grey background
  • Roman statue of Asklepios. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology.
  • Roman statue of Asklepios. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology.
  • Roman statue of Asklepios. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Asklepios. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology.
  • Roman statue of Asklepios. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology.
  • Roman statue of Asklepios. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology.
  • Roman statue of Asklepios. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology.
  • Roman statue of Asklepios. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Dionysus. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Dionysus  is the god of the grape-harvest, winemaking and wine, of fertility, ritual madness, religious ecstasy, and theatre in ancient Greek religion and myth.
  • Roman statue of Dionysus. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Dionysus  is the god of the grape-harvest, winemaking and wine, of fertility, ritual madness, religious ecstasy, and theatre in ancient Greek religion and myth.
  • Roman statue of Dionysus. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Dionysus  is the god of the grape-harvest, winemaking and wine, of fertility, ritual madness, religious ecstasy, and theatre in ancient Greek religion and myth.
  • Roman statue of Dionysus. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Dionysus  is the god of the grape-harvest, winemaking and wine, of fertility, ritual madness, religious ecstasy, and theatre in ancient Greek religion and myth.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Asclepius. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no .Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, one of his his daughters is Hygieia
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/196. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Modest Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Modest Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Modest Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Late  Greek Archaic relief sculpture in Proconnesian Marble of a charioteer ( Last quarter 6th Cent. B.C) From Cyzicus, ( Erdek formerly Artàke, Αρτάκη in Greek) on the southern shore of the sea of Marmara, Turkey. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 2813T Cat. Bursa M.1.
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite, Roman Venus, of Vienne Goddess of Love. This 1st to 2nd century Roman marble copy of a lost Greek original attributed to attibuee Doidalsas Bithynia around 250BC, is of the crouching Venus style. Excavated from the Palace of Mirrors in Saint Romain en Gal (Isere France). The Crouching Venus is a Hellenistic model of Venus surprised at her bath. Venus crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. Louvre Museum, Inv No MNB 1292 ( Usual No Ma 2240)
  • 2nd century Roman marble torso copy of the statue of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture. Louvre Museum, Paris. Usual No 2184
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The style of the Venus of Arles, like the Venus de Milo, is not a fully nude figure both having draped clothes from the waist down. The first known example of a totally nude Venus is the 4th century BC  Aphrodite of Cnidus by.Praxiteles  The Venus of Arles was probably an earlier statue by Praxiteles known as the Aphrodite of Thespiae . <br />
The venus of Arles was found in 1651 by workmen digging a well in Arles. In 1681 it was given to Louis XIV to decorate the Galerie des Glaces of Versailles. The statue was moved to the Musée du Louvre after the French Revolution.
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite, Roman Venus, of Vienne Goddess of Love. This 1st to 2nd century Roman marble copy of a lost Greek original attributed to attibuee Doidalsas Bithynia around 250BC, is of the crouching Venus style. Excavated from the Palace of Mirrors in Saint Romain en Gal (Isere France). The Crouching Venus is a Hellenistic model of Venus surprised at her bath. Venus crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. Louvre Museum, Inv No MNB 1292 ( Usual No Ma 2240)
  • The Kaufmann Aphrodite head. 2nd century Roman marble copy modelled on the statue head of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture. Borghese Collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv no MR657 ( Usual No Ma 421)
  • 2nd century Roman marble torso copy of the statue of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture. Louvre Museum, Paris. Usual No 2184
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Artimis and Doe also known as the Diana of Versailles. A 1st- 2nd century Imperial Roman marble statue of the Greek Goddess Artimis ( Roman Diana) copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  Louvre Mueum, Paris. Cat No MA 589<br />
The slightly over life size Diana (goddess of the hunt)  is accompanied by a under life size doe with antlers. She wears a short Dorian chiton, a himation around her waist, and sandals. She is looking to the right and with her right hand is starting to take an arrow out of a quiver on her back. The bow used to be in her left hand which is holding the deers antlers and part of it can be seen in this hand. This was a popular statue with replicas being found at Leptis Magna (Libya) and at Antalya (Turkey).
  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The style of the Venus of Arles, like the Venus de Milo, is not a fully nude figure both having draped clothes from the waist down. The first known example of a totally nude Venus is the 4th century BC  Aphrodite of Cnidus by.Praxiteles  The Venus of Arles was probably an earlier statue by Praxiteles known as the Aphrodite of Thespiae . <br />
The venus of Arles was found in 1651 by workmen digging a well in Arles. In 1681 it was given to Louis XIV to decorate the Galerie des Glaces of Versailles. The statue was moved to the Musée du Louvre after the French Revolution.
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Statue of Venus, 1st 2nd century Roman. This Roman sculpture retains elements of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. In this version Venus no longer hides her modesty and stands with an arm raised revealing her breasts. British Museum, London.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Statue of Thetsis - a 2nd century AD Roman statue found in the city of Lavinia, Italy. Thetis (/ˈθɛtɪs/; Ancient Greek: Θέτις, [tʰétis]), is encountered in Greek mythology mostly as a sea nymph or known as the goddess of water, one of the fifty Nereids, daughters of the ancient sea god Nereus. he statue belonged to a set of ten divinities formerly presented in the portico hemicycle of the city. The Albani Collection Inv No. LL 19 (Usual No Ma 2244), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Thetsis - a 2nd century AD Roman statue found in the city of Lavinia, Italy. Thetis (/ˈθɛtɪs/; Ancient Greek: Θέτις, [tʰétis]), is encountered in Greek mythology mostly as a sea nymph or known as the goddess of water, one of the fifty Nereids, daughters of the ancient sea god Nereus. he statue belonged to a set of ten divinities formerly presented in the portico hemicycle of the city. The Albani Collection Inv No. LL 19 (Usual No Ma 2244), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Sculpture of Lapiths and  Centaurs battling from the Metope of the Parthenon on the Acropolis of Athens. South Metope no II. Also known as the Elgin marbles. British Museum London. The Lapith holds a Centaur by the throat. The diagnal of the Lapiths body across the Centaur is often used in Greek Classical art to depict strife.
  • Sculpture of Lapiths and  Centaurs battling from the Metope of the Parthenon on the Acropolis of Athens. South Metope no II. Also known as the Elgin marbles. British Museum London. The Lapith holds a Centaur by the throat. The diagnal of the Lapiths body across the Centaur is often used in Greek Classical art to depict strife.
  • Sculpture of Lapiths and  Centaurs battling from the Metope of the Parthenon on the Acropolis of Athens. South Metope no II. Also known as the Elgin marbles. British Museum London. The Lapith holds a Centaur by the throat. The diagnal of the Lapiths body across the Centaur is often used in Greek Classical art to depict strife.
  • Greek  Hellenistic marble statue of Apollo, God of light, fine arts & prophecy, 2nd cent. B.C.  Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 383 T.  Cat. Mendel 548
  • Greek Late Hellenistic marble statue of Baeria, from Magnesia AD Maeandrum ( Menderes Manisasi ), temple of Athens, Turkey. Mid 1st cent. B.C .  Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 605 T.  Cat. Mendel 550
  • Greek statue of a male figure, 2nd cent B.C Greek Hellenistic period, from Pergamon ( Bergama ) , Turkey. Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 2707 T.
  • Marble statue of Athena, the Goddess of Wisdom, Skills & Warfare from Leptis Magna, Tripolitana. Roman copy of Greek 5th cent. B.C statue. Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Turkey. Inv. No 435T Cat. Mendel 532.
  • Greek marble Statue of Hermaphroditius ( Hermaphrodites) a mythical being that has both male & female characteristics. From Pergamum (Bergama) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeology Museum, Inv 363T Cat. Mendel 624.
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. . MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. . MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. . MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. . MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman mosaic of the inside of a church, Eastern Mediterranean, 5th century AD. This abstract representation of a church choir shows two columns, a low lattice  divider and a pair of oriental designed curtains at the top. beyond is the inner sanctum of the church with a Mandorla surrounded by flames with a cross in it. In the foreground is a a hare and devouring a bunch of grapes next to Greek letter that translate to 'Christ rescues'. Inv 5093, The Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of a Young boy playing with snakes, possibly an early Christian mosaic. Syria or Lebanon, 5th century AD. Cubes of marble and limestone. Dressed in a long tunic, the child playing with two snakes could be illustrating a passage from the Book of Isai (11.6 to 8). This fragmented mosaic panel once continued in upper part, as indicated by the animal hoofs, and to the right of the mosaic are remains of a Greek inscription. inv 5094. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Ephyraean Jug decorated with arganaut shells, Markopoulo . Late Helladic IIB culture of mainland ancient Mycenaean Greece during. Cat No 3765, 9103, Athens Archaeological Museum.
  • Ephyraean Jug decorated with arganaut shells, Markopoulo . Late Helladic IIB culture of mainland ancient Mycenaean Greece during. Cat No 3765, 9103, Athens Archaeological Museum.
  • Ephyraean Jug decorated with arganaut shells, Markopoulo . Late Helladic IIB culture of mainland ancient Mycenaean Greece during. Cat No 3765, 9103, Athens Archaeological Museum.
  • Ephyraean Jug decorated with arganaut shells, Markopoulo . Late Helladic IIB culture of mainland ancient Mycenaean Greece during. Cat No 3765, 9103, Athens Archaeological Museum.
  • Severe Style (480 - 450 B.C, Greek Marble Funerary Stele of an athlete from Nisyros (Incir Ada) one of the Foça Islands, . Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Turkey. Inv. No 1142T. Cat. Mendel 11.
  • Statue of  Atalanta a 2nd century Roman sculpture restored in the 17th century. Atalanta  is a character in Greek mythology, a virgin huntress, unwilling to marry, and loved by the hero Meleager.. The Mazarin Collection  Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Juno known as La Providence, a 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Rome, Italy. Juno is an ancient Roman goddess, the protector and special counselor of the state. As the patron goddess of Rome and the Roman Empire, Juno was called Regina ("Queen") and, together with Jupiter and Minerva, was worshipped as a triad on the Capitol (Juno Capitolina) in Rome. The Royal Collection Inv No. MR 333 or Ma 485, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue known as Antonius as Aristaeus. Antinous was the young Bithynian favoured by the emperor Hadrian who was deified after drowning under mysterious circumstances in the waters of the Nile circa 130AD. Thanks to the promotion of the cult Antinous portraits can be found throughout the Empire in the places most frequented by Hadrian. This statue was part of the collection of ancient sculptors bought in Rome by Cardinal Richelieu (1585-1642) for his chateau in Poitou. The favourite of the Emperor Hadrian (117-138 AD) Antonius  is depicted here as Aristaeus, a minor Greek God of fruit trees and bee keeping. The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 73 or Ma 5781, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue known as Antonius as Aristaeus. Antinous was the young Bithynian favoured by the emperor Hadrian who was deified after drowning under mysterious circumstances in the waters of the Nile circa 130AD. Thanks to the promotion of the cult Antinous portraits can be found throughout the Empire in the places most frequented by Hadrian. This statue was part of the collection of ancient sculptors bought in Rome by Cardinal Richelieu (1585-1642) for his chateau in Poitou. The favourite of the Emperor Hadrian (117-138 AD) Antonius  is depicted here as Aristaeus, a minor Greek God of fruit trees and bee keeping. The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 73 or Ma 5781, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue known as Antonius as Aristaeus. Antinous was the young Bithynian favoured by the emperor Hadrian who was deified after drowning under mysterious circumstances in the waters of the Nile circa 130AD. Thanks to the promotion of the cult Antinous portraits can be found throughout the Empire in the places most frequented by Hadrian. This statue was part of the collection of ancient sculptors bought in Rome by Cardinal Richelieu (1585-1642) for his chateau in Poitou. The favourite of the Emperor Hadrian (117-138 AD) Antonius  is depicted here as Aristaeus, a minor Greek God of fruit trees and bee keeping. The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 73 or Ma 5781, Louvre Museum, Paris.

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