• Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053,Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053,Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • The Forum Rome
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Augustus, excavated from El-Jem, sculpted circa 27BC-14AD The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 72.  Against a white background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Augustus, excavated from El-Jem, sculpted circa 27BC-14AD The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 72.  Against a black background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Augustus, excavated from El-Jem, sculpted circa 27BC-14AD The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 72
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Augustus, excavated from El-Jem, sculpted circa 27BC-14AD The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 72
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Augustus, excavated from El-Jem, sculpted circa 27BC-14AD The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 72. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman bronze staue of Augustus Ceasar as Pontifex Maximus, late first century B.C, Naples National Archaeological Museum, white background
  • Roman bronze staue of Augustus Ceasar as Pontifex Maximus, late first century B.C, Naples National Archaeological Museum, black background
  • Roman bronze staue of Augustus Ceasar as Pontifex Maximus, late first century B.C, Naples National Archaeological Museum, grey background
  • Full length frontal view of Roman bronze staue of Augustus Ceasar as Pontifex Maximus, late first century B.C, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Roman bronze staue of Augustus Ceasar as Pontifex Maximus, late first century B.C, Naples National Archaeological Museum, grey art background
  • Roman colossal seated staue of Augustus Caesar, white marble, late first century B.C, inv 6040, Naples National Archaeological Museum, white background
  • Roman colossal seated staue of Augustus Caesar, white marble, late first century B.C, inv 6040, Naples National Archaeological Museum, grey background
  • Roman colossal seated staue of Augustus Caesar, white marble, late first century B.C, inv 6040, Naples National Archaeological Museum, black background
  • Roman colossal seated staue of Augustus Caesar, white marble, late first century B.C, inv 6040, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman colossal seated staue of Augustus Caesar, white marble, late first century B.C, inv 6040, Naples National Archaeological Museum, grey art background
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • The Mazeus Mithridates Gate to the Agora of Ephesus takes its name from the 2 Freed slave of  Emperor Augustus who paid for its contruction. It is dedicated to Emperor Augustus, his wife Livia , his daughter Julia and her husband Agrippa. Built in 4 or 3 B.C. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Rhodian Peristyle built in the time of Emperor Augustus ( 27 B.C. -A.D. 14) and dedicated to Julius Caesar  and the goddess Roma then Augustus & Artemis. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Roma fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Arena of Nemes, a Roman Ampitheatre built around 70 AD during the reign of Emperor Augustus, Nimes, France
  • Interior of the Arena of Nemes, a Roman Ampitheatre built around 70 AD during the reign of Emperor Augustus, Nimes, France
  • Interior of the Arena of Nemes, a Roman Ampitheatre built around 70 AD during the reign of Emperor Augustus, Nimes, France
  • Arena of Nemes, a Roman Ampitheatre built around 70 AD during the reign of Emperor Augustus, Nimes, France
  • Arena of Nemes, a Roman Ampitheatre built around 70 AD during the reign of Emperor Augustus, Nimes, France
  • Interior of the Arena of Nemes, a Roman Ampitheatre built around 70 AD during the reign of Emperor Augustus, Nimes, France
  • The Mazeus Mithridates Gate to the Agora of Ephesus takes its name from the 2 Freed slave of  Emperor Augustus who paid for its contruction. It is dedicated to Emperor Augustus, his wife Livia , his daughter Julia and her husband Agrippa. Built in 4 or 3 B.C. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Rhodian Peristyle built in the time of Emperor Augustus ( 27 B.C. -A.D. 14) and dedicated to Julius Caesar  and the goddess Roma then Augustus & Artemis. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Roman statue in the nude hero style of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue in the nude hero style of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue in the nude hero style of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Vespasian, circa 69-79 AD excavated from Ostia. Titus Flavius Caesar Vespasianus Augustus was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Vespasian, circa 69-79 AD excavated from Ostia. Titus Flavius Caesar Vespasianus Augustus was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Vespasian, circa 69-79 AD excavated from Ostia. Titus Flavius Caesar Vespasianus Augustus was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue in the nude hero style of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue in the nude hero style of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue in the nude hero style of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue in the nude hero style of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue in the nude hero style of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus better known as Caracalla, made between 210 and 213 AD and excavated from the via Cassia, Rome. The realism of this  sculpture of Caracalla captures cruelty of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Roman Empire. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla's reign was also notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana  granting Roman citizenship to all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. While travelling from Edessa to continue the war with Parthia, he was assassinated while urinating at a roadside near Carrhae on 8 April 217, by Julius Martialis, an officer of his personal bodyguard who was possibly resentful at not being promoted to the rank of centurion.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus better known as Caracalla, made between 210 and 213 AD and excavated from the via Cassia, Rome. The realism of this  sculpture of Caracalla captures cruelty of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Roman Empire. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla's reign was also notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana  granting Roman citizenship to all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. While travelling from Edessa to continue the war with Parthia, he was assassinated while urinating at a roadside near Carrhae on 8 April 217, by Julius Martialis, an officer of his personal bodyguard who was possibly resentful at not being promoted to the rank of centurion.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Bird from the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia, Rome (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Arena of Nemes, a Roman Ampitheatre built around 70 AD during the reign of Emperor Augustus, Nimes, France
  • Arena of Nemes, a Roman Ampitheatre built around 70 AD during the reign of Emperor Augustus, Nimes, France
  • Interior of the Arena of Nemes, a Roman Ampitheatre built around 70 AD during the reign of Emperor Augustus, Nimes, France
  • Arena of Nemes, a Roman Ampitheatre built around 70 AD during the reign of Emperor Augustus, Nimes, France
  • Arena of Nemes, a Roman Ampitheatre built around 70 AD during the reign of Emperor Augustus, Nimes, France
  • Arena of Nemes, a Roman Ampitheatre built around 70 AD during the reign of Emperor Augustus, Nimes, France
  • Roman statue in the nude hero style of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Vespasian, circa 69-79 AD excavated from Ostia. Titus Flavius Caesar Vespasianus Augustus was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Vespasian, circa 69-79 AD excavated from Ostia. Titus Flavius Caesar Vespasianus Augustus was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus better known as Caracalla, made between 210 and 213 AD and excavated from the via Cassia, Rome. The realism of this  sculpture of Caracalla captures cruelty of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Roman Empire. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla's reign was also notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana  granting Roman citizenship to all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. While travelling from Edessa to continue the war with Parthia, he was assassinated while urinating at a roadside near Carrhae on 8 April 217, by Julius Martialis, an officer of his personal bodyguard who was possibly resentful at not being promoted to the rank of centurion.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus better known as Caracalla, made between 210 and 213 AD and excavated from the via Cassia, Rome. The realism of this  sculpture of Caracalla captures cruelty of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Roman Empire. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla's reign was also notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana  granting Roman citizenship to all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. While travelling from Edessa to continue the war with Parthia, he was assassinated while urinating at a roadside near Carrhae on 8 April 217, by Julius Martialis, an officer of his personal bodyguard who was possibly resentful at not being promoted to the rank of centurion.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus better known as Caracalla, made between 210 and 213 AD and excavated from the via Cassia, Rome. The realism of this  sculpture of Caracalla captures cruelty of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Roman Empire. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla's reign was also notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana  granting Roman citizenship to all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. While travelling from Edessa to continue the war with Parthia, he was assassinated while urinating at a roadside near Carrhae on 8 April 217, by Julius Martialis, an officer of his personal bodyguard who was possibly resentful at not being promoted to the rank of centurion.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos of the Dacians Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Dacians are shown as a captive Barbarian woman. Her arms are crossed in submission, her thick dress slips off the shoulder slightly partly revealing her breast. The forepart of a small bull stands in profile behind. Dacia (modern Romania) was claimed by Augustus as a conquest in 1BC to 4AD
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos of the Dacians Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Dacians are shown as a captive Barbarian woman. Her arms are crossed in submission, her thick dress slips off the shoulder slightly partly revealing her breast. The forepart of a small bull stands in profile behind. Dacia (modern Romania) was claimed by Augustus as a conquest in 1BC to 4AD
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos of the Dacians Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Dacians are shown as a captive Barbarian woman. Her arms are crossed in submission, her thick dress slips off the shoulder slightly partly revealing her breast. The forepart of a small bull stands in profile behind. Dacia (modern Romania) was claimed by Augustus as a conquest in 1BC to 4AD
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Roman Great Harbour Monument opened by the city of Miletus either in honour of the achievements of Pompeius in his war against the pirates (67 BC) or for the victory of Augustus over Mark Antony and Cleopatra in the battle of Actium (31 BC). Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Roman Great Harbour Monument opened by the city of Miletus either in honour of the achievements of Pompeius in his war against the pirates (67 BC) or for the victory of Augustus over Mark Antony and Cleopatra in the battle of Actium (31 BC). Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Bedroom E of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
Bedroom E, a private room with a bed (kline), was divided into antechamber and alcove. The room is probably a later reworking, as the doorway is off-center. The decoration of the walls, in contrast to cubicula B and D, is done in muted colors. Slender columns with a surreal superstructure frame aedicula with sacred landscapes. Three of these show travellers making a sacrifice to a herm of Athena. The images refer in various ways to the world of women. The little pictures along the walls of the antechamber show girls engaged in different activities. On the rear wall of the alcove, which has a picture with an amorous theme, the goddess Artemis is shown dressed as both huntress and moon goddess. Two Muses are on the opposite wall. The stucco decorations of the vaulted ceiling show idyllic landscapes with sacred elements and mythological scenes. In one, Phaethon asks his father Apollo to let him drive the chariot of the Sun. Other scenes show statues of Zeus, a statue probably representing Augustus as the new Mercury, disks of the sun, winged victories and grotesque figures, all done in very low relief with the elegance and delicacy of jewellery. The mosaic pavement of this room, known from a contemporary watercolor, had a pattern of squares and stars.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Bedroom E of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
Bedroom E, a private room with a bed (kline), was divided into antechamber and alcove. The room is probably a later reworking, as the doorway is off-center. The decoration of the walls, in contrast to cubicula B and D, is done in muted colors. Slender columns with a surreal superstructure frame aedicula with sacred landscapes. Three of these show travellers making a sacrifice to a herm of Athena. The images refer in various ways to the world of women. The little pictures along the walls of the antechamber show girls engaged in different activities. On the rear wall of the alcove, which has a picture with an amorous theme, the goddess Artemis is shown dressed as both huntress and moon goddess. Two Muses are on the opposite wall. The stucco decorations of the vaulted ceiling show idyllic landscapes with sacred elements and mythological scenes. In one, Phaethon asks his father Apollo to let him drive the chariot of the Sun. Other scenes show statues of Zeus, a statue probably representing Augustus as the new Mercury, disks of the sun, winged victories and grotesque figures, all done in very low relief with the elegance and delicacy of jewellery. The mosaic pavement of this room, known from a contemporary watercolor, had a pattern of squares and stars.
  • Roman statue in the nude hero style of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus better known as Caracalla, made between 210 and 213 AD and excavated from the via Cassia, Rome. The realism of this  sculpture of Caracalla captures cruelty of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Roman Empire. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla's reign was also notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana  granting Roman citizenship to all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. While travelling from Edessa to continue the war with Parthia, he was assassinated while urinating at a roadside near Carrhae on 8 April 217, by Julius Martialis, an officer of his personal bodyguard who was possibly resentful at not being promoted to the rank of centurion.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus better known as Caracalla, made between 210 and 213 AD and excavated from the via Cassia, Rome. The realism of this  sculpture of Caracalla captures cruelty of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Roman Empire. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla's reign was also notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana  granting Roman citizenship to all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. While travelling from Edessa to continue the war with Parthia, he was assassinated while urinating at a roadside near Carrhae on 8 April 217, by Julius Martialis, an officer of his personal bodyguard who was possibly resentful at not being promoted to the rank of centurion.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus better known as Caracalla, made between 210 and 213 AD and excavated from the via Cassia, Rome. The realism of this  sculpture of Caracalla captures cruelty of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Roman Empire. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla's reign was also notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana  granting Roman citizenship to all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. While travelling from Edessa to continue the war with Parthia, he was assassinated while urinating at a roadside near Carrhae on 8 April 217, by Julius Martialis, an officer of his personal bodyguard who was possibly resentful at not being promoted to the rank of centurion.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus better known as Caracalla, made between 210 and 213 AD and excavated from the via Cassia, Rome. The realism of this  sculpture of Caracalla captures cruelty of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Roman Empire. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla's reign was also notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana  granting Roman citizenship to all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. While travelling from Edessa to continue the war with Parthia, he was assassinated while urinating at a roadside near Carrhae on 8 April 217, by Julius Martialis, an officer of his personal bodyguard who was possibly resentful at not being promoted to the rank of centurion.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus better known as Caracalla, made between 210 and 213 AD and excavated from the via Cassia, Rome. The realism of this  sculpture of Caracalla captures cruelty of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Roman Empire. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla's reign was also notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana  granting Roman citizenship to all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. While travelling from Edessa to continue the war with Parthia, he was assassinated while urinating at a roadside near Carrhae on 8 April 217, by Julius Martialis, an officer of his personal bodyguard who was possibly resentful at not being promoted to the rank of centurion.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • The Roman Columns of The Building of Eumachia, Pompeii. The inscription on lintel above the columns is to Concordia Augusta, wife of Emperor Augustus, from the priestess Eumachia the patron of the "fullones", an artisan association of dyers. The building was a prototype of medieval hostels were travelling merchant rented accommodation.
  • The Roman Columns of The Building of Eumachia, Pompeii. The inscription on lintel above the columns is to Concordia Augusta, wife of Emperor Augustus, from the priestess Eumachia the patron of the "fullones", an artisan association of dyers. The building was a prototype of medieval hostels were travelling merchant rented accommodation.
  • The Roman Columns of The Building of Eumachia, Pompeii. The inscription on lintel above the columns is to Concordia Augusta, wife of Emperor Augustus, from the priestess Eumachia the patron of the "fullones", an artisan association of dyers. The building was a prototype of medieval hostels were travelling merchant rented accommodation.
  • The Roman Columns of The Building of Eumachia, Pompeii. The inscription on lintel above the columns is to Concordia Augusta, wife of Emperor Augustus, from the priestess Eumachia the patron of the "fullones", an artisan association of dyers. The building was a prototype of medieval hostels were travelling merchant rented accommodation.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos of the Dacians Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The Dacians are shown as a captive Barbarian woman. Her arms are crossed in submission, her thick dress slips off the shoulder slightly partly revealing her breast. The forepart of a small bull stands in profile behind. Dacia (modern Romania) was claimed by Augustus as a conquest in 1BC to 4AD
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos of the Dacians Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Dacians are shown as a captive Barbarian woman. Her arms are crossed in submission, her thick dress slips off the shoulder slightly partly revealing her breast. The forepart of a small bull stands in profile behind. Dacia (modern Romania) was claimed by Augustus as a conquest in 1BC to 4AD
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Roman Great Harbour Monument opened by the city of Miletus either in honour of the achievements of Pompeius in his war against the pirates (67 BC) or for the victory of Augustus over Mark Antony and Cleopatra in the battle of Actium (31 BC). Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • The Roman Columns of The Building of Eumachia, Pompeii. The inscription on lintel above the columns is to Concordia Augusta, wife of Emperor Augustus, from the priestess Eumachia the patron of the "fullones", an artisan association of dyers. The building was a prototype of medieval hostels were travelling merchant rented accommodation.
  • The Roman Columns of The Building of Eumachia, Pompeii. The inscription on lintel above the columns is to Concordia Augusta, wife of Emperor Augustus, from the priestess Eumachia the patron of the "fullones", an artisan association of dyers. The building was a prototype of medieval hostels were travelling merchant rented accommodation.
  • The Roman Columns of The Building of Eumachia, Pompeii. The inscription on lintel above the columns is to Concordia Augusta, wife of Emperor Augustus, from the priestess Eumachia the patron of the "fullones", an artisan association of dyers. The building was a prototype of medieval hostels were travelling merchant rented accommodation.
  • The Roman Columns of The Building of Eumachia, Pompeii. The inscription on lintel above the columns is to Concordia Augusta, wife of Emperor Augustus, from the priestess Eumachia the patron of the "fullones", an artisan association of dyers. The building was a prototype of medieval hostels were travelling merchant rented accommodation.

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