• The Roman Venus Statue, the Goddess of Love, follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of Ttththird century BC Hellenistic Greek statues now lost. Dated circa 1st quarter of second century AD, the Venus statue was excavated from the Odeon of Carthage. The National Bardo Museum, Tunis.  Against a black background.
  • The Roman Venus Statue, the Goddess of Love, follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of Ttththird century BC Hellenistic Greek statues now lost. Dated circa 1st quarter of second century AD, the Venus statue was excavated from the Odeon of Carthage. The National Bardo Museum, Tunis. Against a grey art background.
  • The Roman Venus Statue, the Goddess of Love, follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of Ttththird century BC Hellenistic Greek statues now lost. Dated circa 1st quarter of second century AD, the Venus statue was excavated from the Odeon of Carthage. The National Bardo Museum, Tunis. Against a grey art background.
  • The Roman Venus Statue, the Goddess of Love, follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of the third century BC Hellenistic Greek statues now lost. Dated circa 1st quarter of second century AD, the Venus statue was excavated from the Odeon of Carthage. The National Bardo Museum, Tunis.  Against a white background.
  • The Roman Venus Statue, the Goddess of Love, follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of the third century BC Hellenistic Greek statues now lost. Dated circa 1st quarter of second century AD, the Venus statue was excavated from the Odeon of Carthage. The National Bardo Museum, Tunis.
  • The Roman Venus Statue, the Goddess of Love, follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of The third century BC Hellenistic Greek statues now lost. Dated circa 1st quarter of second century AD, the Venus statue was excavated from the Odeon of Carthage. The National Bardo Museum, Tunis.  Against a white background.
  • The Roman Venus Statue, the Goddess of Love, follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of Ttththird century BC Hellenistic Greek statues now lost. Dated circa 1st quarter of second century AD, the Venus statue was excavated from the Odeon of Carthage. The National Bardo Museum, Tunis.   Against a grey background.
  • The Roman Venus Statue, the Goddess of Love, follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of the third century BC Hellenistic Greek statues now lost. Dated circa 1st quarter of second century AD, the Venus statue was excavated from the Odeon of Carthage. The National Bardo Museum, Tunis.
  • The Roman Venus Statue, the Goddess of Love, follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of Ttththird century BC Hellenistic Greek statues now lost. Dated circa 1st quarter of second century AD, the Venus statue was excavated from the Odeon of Carthage. The National Bardo Museum, Tunis.   Against a grey background.
  • The Roman Venus Statue, the Goddess of Love, follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of Ttththird century BC Hellenistic Greek statues now lost. Dated circa 1st quarter of second century AD, the Venus statue was excavated from the Odeon of Carthage. The National Bardo Museum, Tunis.  Against a black background.
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia Grey background
  • Roman mosaic depicting fishermen.  The fisherman is pushing his boat which had a rod and line on the front of it. From the reign of Emperor Gallienus 260-280 AD. Excavated from The House of Dionysus and Ulysses, Dougga. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus .  Inv 2384, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • Late 2nd early 3rd century AD Roman mosaic depictiong a  chariot race at the circus. From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • First half of the 3rd century AD Roman mosaic depiction  a wild boar and hare hunt. From Hadrumetum (Sousse), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. black background
  • Late 4th century AD Roman mosaic depiction a fishing scene. From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic depiction of two deer between two shrubs. Thysdrus (El Jem), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic panel of  two chickens  from Thugga, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic panel of a drinking scene from Dougga, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of a boar hunt from Cathage, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of a boar hunt from Cathage, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • Roman mosaic depicting in its centre panel the victory of Apollo who is being crowned Marsyas in the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. Late 2nd centruy AD from Thysdrus (El Jem). Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Inv 529 Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting fishermen. The fisherman on the left is about to spear an octopus with a trident. The fisherman in the middle is pushing his boat which had a rod and line on the front of it. From the reign of Emperor Gallienus 260-280 AD. Excavated from The House of Dionysus and Ulysses, Dougga. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus .  Inv 2384, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic celebrating the wedding of the God Dionysus to Ariadene. Late 3rd century AD, Thurbo Majus. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . The Thurbo Majus Room, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman geometric mosaic composed of stars and octagonal medellions with birds in them. Late 3rd century AD, Thurbo Majus. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Christian funerary Mosaic of a ship owner called Felix. The mosaic depicts his two masted above a kantharos, a Greek styled drinking cup, with vines and foliage. At the top is a Constantinian monogram in a laurel wreath which symbolises the deceased devotion to Christianity.  This early Christian mosaic is from Tabarka, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Christian funerary Mosaic of a ship owner called Felix. The mosaic depicts his two masted above a kantharos, a Greek styled drinking cup, with vines and foliage. At the top is a Constantinian monogram in a laurel wreath which symbolises the deceased devotion to Christianity.  This early Christian mosaic is from Tabarka, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Christian funerary Mosaic depicting the fountain of life which was a early Christian ssymbol of Christian faith. This early Christian mosaic is from Basilica of Furnos Minus, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 4th century AD Roman mosaic depiction of Roman Villa farms in Africa. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 4th century AD Roman mosaic depiction of Roman Villa farms in Africa. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. black background
  • 4th century AD Roman mosaic depiction of Roman Villa farms in Africa. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • 2nd century AD Roman mosaic depictiong Neptune. From Augusti (Sidi El Heni), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • 2nd century AD Roman mosaic depictiong Neptune. From Augusti (Sidi El Heni), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 2nd century AD Roman mosaic depictiong Neptune. From Augusti (Sidi El Heni), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White Background.
  • Late 2nd early 3rd century AD Roman mosaic depictiong a  chariot race at the circus. From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White Background.
  • Late 2nd early 3rd century AD Roman mosaic depictiong a  chariot race at the circus. From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. black background
  • First half of the 3rd century AD Roman mosaic depiction  a wild boar and hare hunt. From Hadrumetum (Sousse), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • Late 4th century AD Roman mosaic depiction a fishing scene. From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White Background.
  • Late 4th century AD Roman mosaic depiction a fishing scene. From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • Late 4th century AD Roman mosaic depiction a harbour scene with men unloading and weighing goods. From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Early 5th century AD Roman mosaic depiction of the farm of Seigneur Julius . From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • Second half of the 4th century AD Roman mosaic depiction of a Peacock with raised tail feathers, and horses from the four fractions of the circus . From the House of the Peacock, Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Second half of the 4th century AD Roman mosaic depiction of a Peacock with raised tail feathers, and horses from the four fractions of the circus . From the House of the Peacock, Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic depiction of two deer between two shrubs. Thysdrus (El Jem), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic depiction of a wine flagon & cup. Thysdrus (El Jem), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic water basin mosaic depicting the head of Neptune surrounded by sea monsters and Nereids (nymphs), and Xenia which were gifts of hospitality. From the House of Neptune, Thuburbo Maius, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Late 4th century AD Roman mosaic panel of  Venus, Aphrodite, on a boat crowning herself accompanied by six dwarfs. From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • Late 4th century AD Roman mosaic panel of  Venus, Aphrodite, on a boat crowning herself accompanied by six dwarfs. From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • Late 4th century AD Roman mosaic panel of  Venus, Aphrodite, on a boat crowning herself accompanied by six dwarfs. From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic panel of  two birds  from Thugga, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic panel of apples in a basket from Thugga, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic panel of  two chickens  from Thugga, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic panel of two mallard ducks from Thugga, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic panel of fruit in a basket from Thugga, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic panel of a drinking scene from Dougga, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • Detail from the Roman mosaic panel of the Triumph of Neptune and  the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. From the private baths at Caput Vada (La Chebbs). End of the reign of Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. From Cheba, Tunisia.  The Thugga Room of The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic panel of the Triumph of Neptune and  the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. From the private baths at Caput Vada (La Chebbs). End of the reign of Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. From Cheba, Tunisia.  The Thugga Room of The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • 3rd century Roman mosaic panel of a boar and a sow lying down. From Thysdrus (El Jem), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 5th century Roman mosaic panel of the ceremonial dressing of a lady. The lady was of the landed gentry from inland Carthage. She is sitting on a high backed armchair and is surrounded by two ornatrix, maids, whoa re helping her to apply make up and style her hair. Items related to bathing and grooming are depicted on the background of the mosaic. The maid hold a mirror for the lady in which we see her reflection The scene is an allegory of the myth of ‘Venus at her toilet’.<br />
<br />
From the floor of the changing room of the private baths of the Sidi Ghraib villa, Borj El Amre region, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 5th century Roman mosaic panel of the ceremonial dressing of a lady. The lady was of the landed gentry from inland Carthage. She is sitting on a high backed armchair and is surrounded by two ornatrix, maids, whoa re helping her to apply make up and style her hair. Items related to bathing and grooming are depicted on the background of the mosaic. The maid hold a mirror for the lady in which we see her reflection The scene is an allegory of the myth of ‘Venus at her toilet’.<br />
<br />
From the floor of the changing room of the private baths of the Sidi Ghraib villa, Borj El Amre region, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting in its centre panel the victory of Apollo who is being crowned Marsyas in the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. Late 2nd centruy AD from Thysdrus (El Jem). Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Inv 529 Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Corner panel from a Roman mosaic depicting the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. Late 2nd centruy AD from Thysdrus (El Jem). Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus .Inv 529 Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting in its centre panel the victory of Apollo who is being crowned Marsyas in the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. Late 2nd centruy AD from Thysdrus (El Jem). Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Inv 529 Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting fishermen. The fisherman on the left is about to spear an octopus with a trident. The fisherman in the middle is pushing his boat which had a rod and line on the front of it. From the reign of Emperor Gallienus 260-280 AD. Excavated from The House of Dionysus and Ulysses, Dougga. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus .  Inv 2384, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Detail of a fish from a Roman mosaic depicting fishermen from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Inv 2384, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting fishermen. The fisherman on the left is about to spear an octopus with a trident. The fisherman in the middle is pushing his boat which had a rod and line on the front of it. From the reign of Emperor Gallienus 260-280 AD. Excavated from The House of Dionysus and Ulysses, Dougga. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus .  Inv 2384, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting fishermen. The fisherman on the left is about to spear an octopus with a trident. The fisherman in the middle is pushing his boat which had a rod and line on the front of it. From the reign of Emperor Gallienus 260-280 AD. Excavated from The House of Dionysus and Ulysses, Dougga. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus .  Inv 2384, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting the Four Seasons (spring is destroyed). Late 3rd century AD, Thysdrus (El Jem). Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic celebrating the wedding of the God Dionysus to Ariadene. Late 3rd century AD, Thurbo Majus. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . The Thurbo Majus Room, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic celebrating the wedding of the God Dionysus to Ariadene. Late 3rd century AD, Thurbo Majus. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . The Thurbo Majus Room, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Christian funerary Mosaic of a ship owner called Felix. The mosaic depicts his two masted above a kantharos, a Greek styled drinking cup, with vines and foliage. At the top is a Constantinian monogram in a laurel wreath which symbolises the deceased devotion to Christianity.  This early Christian mosaic is from Tabarka, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Christian funerary Mosaic of a ship owner called Felix. The mosaic depicts his two masted above a kantharos, a Greek styled drinking cup, with vines and foliage. At the top is a Constantinian monogram in a laurel wreath which symbolises the deceased devotion to Christianity.  This early Christian mosaic is from Tabarka, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Christian funerary Mosaic depicting the fountain of life which was a early Christian ssymbol of Christian faith. This early Christian mosaic is from Basilica of Furnos Minus, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Christian funerary Mosaic of Matziceus who was from Libyia and this funerary mosaic reads, ‘ the faithful Matziceus lived in peace for 42 years, rested on the fifteenth of the calends of June’. The mosaic depicts two tendrils of vine thrusting out of a cantharus with peacocks & birds. This early Christian mosaic is from Demna Parish Church, left aisle, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Christian funerary Mosaic of Matziceus who was from Libyia and this funerary mosaic reads, ‘ the faithful Matziceus lived in peace for 42 years, rested on the fifteenth of the calends of June’. The mosaic depicts two tendrils of vine thrusting out of a cantharus with peacocks & birds. This early Christian mosaic is from Demna Parish Church, left aisle, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaics depicting mythical sea gods & godesses from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Mid 2nd century AD Roman mosaic depicting Xenia which were gifts of hospitality as well as various animals. From Thysdrus (El Jem), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White Background.
  • Mid 2nd century AD Roman mosaic depicting Xenia which were gifts of hospitality as well as various animals. From Thysdrus (El Jem), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • 4th century AD Roman mosaic depiction of Roman Villa farms in Africa. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Mid 2nd century AD Roman mosaic depicting Xenia which were gifts of hospitality as well as various animals. From Thysdrus (El Jem), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 4th century AD Roman mosaic depiction of Roman Villa farms in Africa. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 4th century AD Roman mosaic depiction of Roman Villa farms in Africa. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White Background.
  • 2nd century AD Roman mosaic depictiong Neptune. From Augusti (Sidi El Heni), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. black background
  • Late 2nd early 3rd century AD Roman mosaic depictiong a  chariot race at the circus. From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • First half of the 3rd century AD Roman mosaic depiction  a wild boar and hare hunt. From Hadrumetum (Sousse), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White Background.
  • Late 4th century AD Roman mosaic depiction a fishing scene. From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • Late 4th century AD Roman mosaic depiction a harbour scene with men unloading and weighing goods. From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Late 4th century AD Roman mosaic depiction a harbour scene with men unloading and weighing goods. From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • Early 5th century AD Roman mosaic depiction of the farm of Seigneur Julius . From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Early 5th century AD Roman mosaic depiction of the farm of Seigneur Julius . From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Early 5th century AD Roman mosaic depiction of the farm of Seigneur Julius . From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • Second half of the 4th century AD Roman mosaic depiction of a Peacock with raised tail feathers, and horses from the four fractions of the circus . From the House of the Peacock, Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • Second half of the 4th century AD Roman mosaic depiction of a Peacock with raised tail feathers, and horses from the four fractions of the circus . From the House of the Peacock, Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic depiction of two deer between two shrubs. Thysdrus (El Jem), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic depiction of two deer between two shrubs. Thysdrus (El Jem), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic depiction of two deer between two shrubs. Thysdrus (El Jem), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • Late 4th century AD Roman mosaic panel of  Venus, Aphrodite, on a boat crowning herself accompanied by six dwarfs. From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic panel of  two fish from Thugga, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic panel of  two birds  from Thugga, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic panel of pomegranates in a basket from Thugga, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic panel of pears in a basket from Thugga, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic panel of a drinking scene from Dougga, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic panel of a drinking scene from Dougga, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • Detail from the Roman mosaic panel of the Triumph of Neptune and  the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. From the private baths at Caput Vada (La Chebbs). End of the reign of Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. From Cheba, Tunisia.  The Thugga Room of The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Detail from the Roman mosaic panel of the Triumph of Neptune and  the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. From the private baths at Caput Vada (La Chebbs). End of the reign of Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. From Cheba, Tunisia.  The Thugga Room of The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Detail from the Roman mosaic panel of the Triumph of Neptune and  the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. From the private baths at Caput Vada (La Chebbs). End of the reign of Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. From Cheba, Tunisia.  The Thugga Room of The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Detail from the Roman mosaic panel of the Triumph of Neptune and  the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. From the private baths at Caput Vada (La Chebbs). End of the reign of Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. From Cheba, Tunisia.  The Thugga Room of The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Detail from the Roman mosaic panel of the Triumph of Neptune and  the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. From the private baths at Caput Vada (La Chebbs). End of the reign of Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. From Cheba, Tunisia.  The Thugga Room of The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Detail from the Roman mosaic panel of the Triumph of Neptune and  the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. From the private baths at Caput Vada (La Chebbs). End of the reign of Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. From Cheba, Tunisia.  The Thugga Room of The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic panel of the Triumph of Neptune and  the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. From the private baths at Caput Vada (La Chebbs). End of the reign of Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. From Cheba, Tunisia.  The Thugga Room of The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic panel of the Triumph of Neptune and  the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. From the private baths at Caput Vada (La Chebbs). End of the reign of Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. From Cheba, Tunisia.  The Thugga Room of The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • Roman mosaic panel of the Triumph of Neptune and  the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. From the private baths at Caput Vada (La Chebbs). End of the reign of Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. From Cheba, Tunisia.  The Thugga Room of The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • Roman mosaic panel of the Triumph of Neptune and  the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. From the private baths at Caput Vada (La Chebbs). End of the reign of Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. From Cheba, Tunisia.  The Thugga Room of The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of Eros, a circus chariot rider of the Red Fraction. From Dougga, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century Roman mosaic panel of black and white grapes. From Thysdrus (El Jem), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.  Grey background
  • 3rd century Roman mosaic panel of black and white grapes. From Thysdrus (El Jem), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century Roman mosaic panel of black and white grapes. From Thysdrus (El Jem), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century Roman mosaic panel of black and white grapes. From Thysdrus (El Jem), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • 3rd century Roman mosaic panel of a boar and a sow lying down. From Thysdrus (El Jem), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.  Grey background
  • 3rd century Roman mosaic panel of a boar and a sow lying down. From Thysdrus (El Jem), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of a boar hunt from Cathage, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • Detail from the Roman mosaic depicting Dionysus repelling pirates from his ship.  Inv 2884B Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting Dionysus repelling pirates from his ship.  He is accompanied by Acoetes, the helmsman and his tutor Silenus, right. Dionysus, in the form a panther, centre,  is repelling pirates from his ship who turn into dolphins as they jump overboard . Dated from the reign of Emperor Gallienus, 260-280 AD from the the house of Dionysus and Ulysses, Dougga. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Inv 2884B Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 5th century Roman mosaic panel of the ceremonial dressing of a lady. The lady was of the landed gentry from inland Carthage. She is sitting on a high backed armchair and is surrounded by two ornatrix, maids, whoa re helping her to apply make up and style her hair. Items related to bathing and grooming are depicted on the background of the mosaic. The maid hold a mirror for the lady in which we see her reflection The scene is an allegory of the myth of ‘Venus at her toilet’.<br />
<br />
From the floor of the changing room of the private baths of the Sidi Ghraib villa, Borj El Amre region, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 5th century Roman mosaic panel of the ceremonial dressing of a lady. The lady was of the landed gentry from inland Carthage. She is sitting on a high backed armchair and is surrounded by two ornatrix, maids, whoa re helping her to apply make up and style her hair. Items related to bathing and grooming are depicted on the background of the mosaic. The maid hold a mirror for the lady in which we see her reflection The scene is an allegory of the myth of ‘Venus at her toilet’.<br />
<br />
From the floor of the changing room of the private baths of the Sidi Ghraib villa, Borj El Amre region, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 5th century Roman mosaic panel of the ceremonial dressing of a lady. The lady was of the landed gentry from inland Carthage. She is sitting on a high backed armchair and is surrounded by two ornatrix, maids, whoa re helping her to apply make up and style her hair. Items related to bathing and grooming are depicted on the background of the mosaic. The maid hold a mirror for the lady in which we see her reflection The scene is an allegory of the myth of ‘Venus at her toilet’.<br />
<br />
From the floor of the changing room of the private baths of the Sidi Ghraib villa, Borj El Amre region, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • 5th century Roman mosaic panel of the ceremonial dressing of a lady. The lady was of the landed gentry from inland Carthage. She is sitting on a high backed armchair and is surrounded by two ornatrix, maids, whoa re helping her to apply make up and style her hair. Items related to bathing and grooming are depicted on the background of the mosaic. The maid hold a mirror for the lady in which we see her reflection The scene is an allegory of the myth of ‘Venus at her toilet’.<br />
<br />
From the floor of the changing room of the private baths of the Sidi Ghraib villa, Borj El Amre region, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • Roman mosaic depicting The Education of Achilles by the Centaur Chiron. Achilles , left, is depicted riding a centaur ( mosaic of its body s missing) and is about to kill a deer. In the bottom right hand corner is a Chimera was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing hybrid creature of Lycia in Asia Minor, composed of the parts of more than one animal. The mosaic follows the story of Bellerophon who was a ‘great slayer of monsters’. From Belalis Major (Henshir El-Fawar ) in the Beja region of Tunisia. Early 7th century AD.Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting in its centre panel the victory of Apollo who is being crowned Marsyas in the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. Late 2nd centruy AD from Thysdrus (El Jem). Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Inv 529 Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting in its centre panel the victory of Apollo who is being crowned Marsyas in the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. Late 2nd centruy AD from Thysdrus (El Jem). Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Inv 529 Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting Dionysus repelling pirates from his ship.  He is accompanied by Acoetes, the helmsman and his tutor Silenus, right. Dionysus, in the form a panther, centre,  is repelling pirates from his ship who turn into dolphins as they jump overboard . Dated from the reign of Emperor Gallienus, 260-280 AD from the the house of Dionysus and Ulysses, Dougga. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Inv 2884B Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting Dionysus repelling pirates from his ship.  He is accompanied by Acoetes, the helmsman and his tutor Silenus, right. Dionysus, in the form a panther, centre,  is repelling pirates from his ship who turn into dolphins as they jump overboard . Dated from the reign of Emperor Gallienus, 260-280 AD from the the house of Dionysus and Ulysses, Dougga. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Inv 2884B Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting fishermen. The fisherman on the left is about to spear an octopus with a trident. The fisherman in the middle is pushing his boat which had a rod and line on the front of it. From the reign of Emperor Gallienus 260-280 AD. Excavated from The House of Dionysus and Ulysses, Dougga. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus .  Inv 2384, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting the Four Seasons (spring is destroyed). Late 3rd century AD, Thysdrus (El Jem). Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting the Four Seasons (spring is destroyed). Late 3rd century AD, Thysdrus (El Jem). Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting the Four Seasons (spring is destroyed). Late 3rd century AD, Thysdrus (El Jem). Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic celebrating the wedding of the God Dionysus to Ariadene. Late 3rd century AD, Thurbo Majus. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . The Thurbo Majus Room, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting The Education of Achilles by the Centaur Chiron. Achilles , left, is depicted riding a centaur ( mosaic of its body s missing) and is about to kill a deer. In the bottom right hand corner is a Chimera was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing hybrid creature of Lycia in Asia Minor, composed of the parts of more than one animal. The mosaic follows the story of Bellerophon who was a ‘great slayer of monsters’. From Belalis Major (Henshir El-Fawar ) in the Beja region of Tunisia. Early 7th century AD.Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman geometric mosaic composed of stars and octagonal medellions with birds in them. Late 3rd century AD, Thurbo Majus. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting The Education of Achilles by the Centaur Chiron. Achilles , left, is depicted riding a centaur ( mosaic of its body s missing) and is about to kill a deer. In the bottom right hand corner is a Chimera was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing hybrid creature of Lycia in Asia Minor, composed of the parts of more than one animal. The mosaic follows the story of Bellerophon who was a ‘great slayer of monsters’. From Belalis Major (Henshir El-Fawar ) in the Beja region of Tunisia. Early 7th century AD.Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Christian funerary Mosaic of a ship owner called Felix. The mosaic depicts his two masted above a kantharos, a Greek styled drinking cup, with vines and foliage. At the top is a Constantinian monogram in a laurel wreath which symbolises the deceased devotion to Christianity.  This early Christian mosaic is from Tabarka, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Christian funerary Mosaic of a ship owner called Felix. The mosaic depicts his two masted above a kantharos, a Greek styled drinking cup, with vines and foliage. At the top is a Constantinian monogram in a laurel wreath which symbolises the deceased devotion to Christianity.  This early Christian mosaic is from Tabarka, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Christian funerary Mosaic depicting the fountain of life which was a early Christian ssymbol of Christian faith. This early Christian mosaic is from Basilica of Furnos Minus, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Christian funerary Mosaic depicting the fountain of life which was a early Christian ssymbol of Christian faith. This early Christian mosaic is from Basilica of Furnos Minus, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Christian funerary Mosaic depicting the fountain of life which was a early Christian ssymbol of Christian faith. This early Christian mosaic is from Basilica of Furnos Minus, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Mid 2nd century AD Roman mosaic depicting Xenia which were gifts of hospitality as well as various animals. From Thysdrus (El Jem), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. black background
  • First half of the 3rd century AD Roman mosaic depiction  a wild boar and hare hunt. From Hadrumetum (Sousse), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Late 4th century AD Roman mosaic depiction a harbour scene with men unloading and weighing goods. From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic depiction of a wine flagon & cup. Thysdrus (El Jem), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century AD Roman mosaic panel of   fish from Thugga, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 3rd century Roman mosaic panel of a boar and a sow lying down. From Thysdrus (El Jem), Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.  White background
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of a boar hunt from Cathage, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • Roman mosaic depicting The Education of Achilles by the Centaur Chiron. Achilles , left, is depicted riding a centaur ( mosaic of its body s missing) and is about to kill a deer. In the bottom right hand corner is a Chimera was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing hybrid creature of Lycia in Asia Minor, composed of the parts of more than one animal. The mosaic follows the story of Bellerophon who was a ‘great slayer of monsters’. From Belalis Major (Henshir El-Fawar ) in the Beja region of Tunisia. Early 7th century AD.Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting in its centre panel the victory of Apollo who is being crowned Marsyas in the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. Late 2nd centruy AD from Thysdrus (El Jem). Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Inv 529 Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic celebrating the wedding of the God Dionysus to Ariadene. Late 3rd century AD, Thurbo Majus. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . The Thurbo Majus Room, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Christian funerary Mosaic of a ship owner called Felix. The mosaic depicts his two masted above a kantharos, a Greek styled drinking cup, with vines and foliage. At the top is a Constantinian monogram in a laurel wreath which symbolises the deceased devotion to Christianity.  This early Christian mosaic is from Tabarka, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. v
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century v Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additio-nal details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century  Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Septime Severe, excavated  from Choud El Battan sculpted circa 193-211AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.73
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Septime Severe, excavated  from Choud El Battan sculpted circa 193-211AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.73. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Vitellius, excavated  from Althiburos sculpted circa 20 April 69-20 Dec 69AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.1784
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Augustus, excavated from El-Jem, sculpted circa 27BC-14AD The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 72. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Gordian 1st, excavated from Carthage ( ruled 3 months in 238AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 3212. v
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Gordian 1st, excavated from Carthage ( ruled 3 months in 238AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 3212. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Caracalla, excavated from Thuburbo-Majus, sculpted circa 211-217AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 1347
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Augustus, excavated from El-Jem, sculpted circa 27BC-14AD The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 72
  • Second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939.   Against a grey background.
  • Second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939
  • Second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Septime Severe, excavated  from Choud El Battan sculpted circa 193-211AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.73.  Against a white background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Septime Severe, excavated  from Choud El Battan sculpted circa 193-211AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.73.   Against a grey background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Septime Severe, excavated  from Choud El Battan sculpted circa 193-211AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.73
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated  from Carthage made circa 161-180 AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.965.  Against a white background.

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