• low full length view of the  Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso face on view of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Full length view of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso three quarter of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this period. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Full length tree quarter view of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this peiod. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Upper torso of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this peiod. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Full length face on view of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this peiod. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Full length side view of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this peiod. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Artimis and Doe also known as the Diana of Versailles. A 1st- 2nd century Imperial Roman marble statue of the Greek Goddess Artimis ( Roman Diana) copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  Louvre Mueum, Paris. Cat No MA 589<br />
The slightly over life size Diana (goddess of the hunt)  is accompanied by a under life size doe with antlers. She wears a short Dorian chiton, a himation around her waist, and sandals. She is looking to the right and with her right hand is starting to take an arrow out of a quiver on her back. The bow used to be in her left hand which is holding the deers antlers and part of it can be seen in this hand. This was a popular statue with replicas being found at Leptis Magna (Libya) and at Antalya (Turkey).
  • Artimis and Doe also known as the Diana of Versailles. A 1st- 2nd century Imperial Roman marble statue of the Greek Goddess Artimis ( Roman Diana) copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  Louvre Mueum, Paris. Cat No MA 589<br />
The slightly over life size Diana (goddess of the hunt)  is accompanied by a under life size doe with antlers. She wears a short Dorian chiton, a himation around her waist, and sandals. She is looking to the right and with her right hand is starting to take an arrow out of a quiver on her back. The bow used to be in her left hand which is holding the deers antlers and part of it can be seen in this hand. This was a popular statue with replicas being found at Leptis Magna (Libya) and at Antalya (Turkey).
  • Artimis and Doe also known as the Diana of Versailles. A 1st- 2nd century Imperial Roman marble statue of the Greek Goddess Artimis ( Roman Diana) copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  Louvre Mueum, Paris. Cat No MA 589<br />
The slightly over life size Diana (goddess of the hunt)  is accompanied by a under life size doe with antlers. She wears a short Dorian chiton, a himation around her waist, and sandals. She is looking to the right and with her right hand is starting to take an arrow out of a quiver on her back. The bow used to be in her left hand which is holding the deers antlers and part of it can be seen in this hand. This was a popular statue with replicas being found at Leptis Magna (Libya) and at Antalya (Turkey).
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus.  A Life size  2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Aphrodite- type known as the Venus of Arles. A Roman statue in marble of the 1st - 2nd century AD in marble from Rome. The statue is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) and is  probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae a lost bronze sculpture by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . From the Royal collection Inv MR 366 ( or Ma 437), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite- type known as the Venus of Arles. A Roman statue in marble of the 1st - 2nd century AD in marble from Rome. The statue is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) and is  probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae a lost bronze sculpture by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . From the Royal collection Inv MR 366 ( or Ma 437), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite- type known as the Venus of Arles. A Roman statue in marble of the 1st - 2nd century AD in marble from Rome. The statue is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) and is  probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae a lost bronze sculpture by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . From the Royal collection Inv MR 366 ( or Ma 437), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • The Ares Borghese is a Roman marble statue of the imperial era, 1st or 2nd century AD. This statue possibly preserves some features of an original work in bronze, now lost, of the 5th century BC by Alcamenes, an Athenian sculptor, or the statue may not be a copy of Alcamenes's, but instead a Roman creation according to a classicising or Neo-Attic type. Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman bust of Greek philosopher Aristolte. 1st - 2nd century AD from Italy made of Pentilic Marble from Athens Greece. Aristotle lived around 384-322 BC and became the tutor of Alexander The Great. This bust was copied from a lost Greek bronze original by Lysippe (370-300BC) , sculptor to Alexander The Great. Traces of the original paint can be seen on the beard. From the Borghese collection Inv Mr or Ma 80 ,  Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artimis and Doe also known as the Diana of Versailles. A 1st- 2nd century Imperial Roman marble statue of the Greek Goddess Artimis ( Roman Diana) copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  Louvre Mueum, Paris. Cat No MA 589<br />
The slightly over life size Diana (goddess of the hunt)  is accompanied by a under life size doe with antlers. She wears a short Dorian chiton, a himation around her waist, and sandals. She is looking to the right and with her right hand is starting to take an arrow out of a quiver on her back. The bow used to be in her left hand which is holding the deers antlers and part of it can be seen in this hand. This was a popular statue with replicas being found at Leptis Magna (Libya) and at Antalya (Turkey).
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Bust of Greek Philosopher Plato. A  2nd century AD Roman sculpture in marble. In  423-348 BC Greek sculptor Silanion created a bronze bust of Plato to adorn the gardens of the Acadamy in Athens, at the request of Persia Mithridite, according to Diogenes Laertius (De Vitis Philosophorum III, 25 citing Memorabilia Favorinus ). This Roman copy of the Greek original can be identified by the la two letters of “Plato” inscribed on it.  Inv MR 415   (or Ma 2654), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Bust of Greek Philosopher Plato. A  2nd century AD Roman sculpture in marble. In  423-348 BC Greek sculptor Silanion created a bronze bust of Plato to adorn the gardens of the Acadamy in Athens, at the request of Persia Mithridite, according to Diogenes Laertius (De Vitis Philosophorum III, 25 citing Memorabilia Favorinus ). This Roman copy of the Greek original can be identified by the la two letters of “Plato” inscribed on it.  Inv MR 415   (or Ma 2654), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Bust of Greek Philosopher Plato. A  2nd century AD Roman sculpture in marble. In  423-348 BC Greek sculptor Silanion created a bronze bust of Plato to adorn the gardens of the Acadamy in Athens, at the request of Persia Mithridite, according to Diogenes Laertius (De Vitis Philosophorum III, 25 citing Memorabilia Favorinus ). This Roman copy of the Greek original can be identified by the la two letters of “Plato” inscribed on it.  Inv MR 415   (or Ma 2654), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Bust of Greek Philosopher Plato. A  2nd century AD Roman sculpture in marble. In  423-348 BC Greek sculptor Silanion created a bronze bust of Plato to adorn the gardens of the Acadamy in Athens, at the request of Persia Mithridite, according to Diogenes Laertius (De Vitis Philosophorum III, 25 citing Memorabilia Favorinus ). This Roman copy of the Greek original can be identified by the la two letters of “Plato” inscribed on it.  Inv MR 415   (or Ma 2654), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Bust of Greek Philosopher Plato. A  2nd century AD Roman sculpture in marble. In  423-348 BC Greek sculptor Silanion created a bronze bust of Plato to adorn the gardens of the Acadamy in Athens, at the request of Persia Mithridite, according to Diogenes Laertius (De Vitis Philosophorum III, 25 citing Memorabilia Favorinus ). This Roman copy of the Greek original can be identified by the la two letters of “Plato” inscribed on it.  Inv MR 415   (or Ma 2654), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Bust of Greek Philosopher Plato. A  2nd century AD Roman sculpture in marble. In  423-348 BC Greek sculptor Silanion created a bronze bust of Plato to adorn the gardens of the Acadamy in Athens, at the request of Persia Mithridite, according to Diogenes Laertius (De Vitis Philosophorum III, 25 citing Memorabilia Favorinus ). This Roman copy of the Greek original can be identified by the la two letters of “Plato” inscribed on it.  Inv MR 415   (or Ma 2654), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Bust of Greek Philosopher Plato. A  2nd century AD Roman sculpture in marble. In  423-348 BC Greek sculptor Silanion created a bronze bust of Plato to adorn the gardens of the Acadamy in Athens, at the request of Persia Mithridite, according to Diogenes Laertius (De Vitis Philosophorum III, 25 citing Memorabilia Favorinus ). This Roman copy of the Greek original can be identified by the la two letters of “Plato” inscribed on it.  Inv MR 415   (or Ma 2654), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Bust of Greek Philosopher Plato. A  2nd century AD Roman sculpture in marble. In  423-348 BC Greek sculptor Silanion created a bronze bust of Plato to adorn the gardens of the Acadamy in Athens, at the request of Persia Mithridite, according to Diogenes Laertius (De Vitis Philosophorum III, 25 citing Memorabilia Favorinus ). This Roman copy of the Greek original can be identified by the la two letters of “Plato” inscribed on it.  Inv MR 415   (or Ma 2654), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Bust of Greek Philosopher Plato. A  2nd century AD Roman sculpture in marble. In  423-348 BC Greek sculptor Silanion created a bronze bust of Plato to adorn the gardens of the Acadamy in Athens, at the request of Persia Mithridite, according to Diogenes Laertius (De Vitis Philosophorum III, 25 citing Memorabilia Favorinus ). This Roman copy of the Greek original can be identified by the la two letters of “Plato” inscribed on it.  Inv MR 415   (or Ma 2654), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Roman bust of Greek philosopher Aristolte. 1st - 2nd century AD from Italy made of Pentilic Marble from Athens Greece. Aristotle lived around 384-322 BC and became the tutor of Alexander The Great. This bust was copied from a lost Greek bronze original by Lysippe (370-300BC) , sculptor to Alexander The Great. Traces of the original paint can be seen on the beard. From the Borghese collection Inv Mr or Ma 80 ,  Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman bust of Greek philosopher Aristolte. 1st - 2nd century AD from Italy made of Pentilic Marble from Athens Greece. Aristotle lived around 384-322 BC and became the tutor of Alexander The Great. This bust was copied from a lost Greek bronze original by Lysippe (370-300BC) , sculptor to Alexander The Great. Traces of the original paint can be seen on the beard. From the Borghese collection Inv Mr or Ma 80 ,  Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman bust of Greek philosopher Aristolte. 1st - 2nd century AD from Italy made of Pentilic Marble from Athens Greece. Aristotle lived around 384-322 BC and became the tutor of Alexander The Great. This bust was copied from a lost Greek bronze original by Lysippe (370-300BC) , sculptor to Alexander The Great. Traces of the original paint can be seen on the beard. From the Borghese collection Inv Mr or Ma 80 ,  Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman bust of Greek philosopher Aristolte. 1st - 2nd century AD from Italy made of Pentilic Marble from Athens Greece. Aristotle lived around 384-322 BC and became the tutor of Alexander The Great. This bust was copied from a lost Greek bronze original by Lysippe (370-300BC) , sculptor to Alexander The Great. Traces of the original paint can be seen on the beard. From the Borghese collection Inv Mr or Ma 80 ,  Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman bust of Greek philosopher Aristolte. 1st - 2nd century AD from Italy made of Pentilic Marble from Athens Greece. Aristotle lived around 384-322 BC and became the tutor of Alexander The Great. This bust was copied from a lost Greek bronze original by Lysippe (370-300BC) , sculptor to Alexander The Great. Traces of the original paint can be seen on the beard. From the Borghese collection Inv Mr or Ma 80 ,  Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman bust of Greek philosopher Aristolte. 1st - 2nd century AD from Italy made of Pentilic Marble from Athens Greece. Aristotle lived around 384-322 BC and became the tutor of Alexander The Great. This bust was copied from a lost Greek bronze original by Lysippe (370-300BC) , sculptor to Alexander The Great. Traces of the original paint can be seen on the beard. From the Borghese collection Inv Mr or Ma 80 ,  Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman bust of Greek philosopher Aristolte. 1st - 2nd century AD from Italy made of Pentilic Marble from Athens Greece. Aristotle lived around 384-322 BC and became the tutor of Alexander The Great. This bust was copied from a lost Greek bronze original by Lysippe (370-300BC) , sculptor to Alexander The Great. Traces of the original paint can be seen on the beard. From the Borghese collection Inv Mr or Ma 80 ,  Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman bust of Greek philosopher Aristolte. 1st - 2nd century AD from Italy made of Pentilic Marble from Athens Greece. Aristotle lived around 384-322 BC and became the tutor of Alexander The Great. This bust was copied from a lost Greek bronze original by Lysippe (370-300BC) , sculptor to Alexander The Great. Traces of the original paint can be seen on the beard. From the Borghese collection Inv Mr or Ma 80 ,  Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite- type known as the Venus of Arles. A Roman statue in marble of the 1st - 2nd century AD in marble from Rome. The statue is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) and is  probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae a lost bronze sculpture by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . From the Royal collection Inv MR 366 ( or Ma 437), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite- type known as the Venus of Arles. A Roman statue in marble of the 1st - 2nd century AD in marble from Rome. The statue is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) and is  probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae a lost bronze sculpture by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . From the Royal collection Inv MR 366 ( or Ma 437), Louvre Museum, Paris.

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