• Medieval ivory relief panel from a diptych depicting a triumphant Byzantine Roman Emperor, probably Justinian. From Constantinople, 6th century. Inv. OA 9063, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Christian ivory diptych depicting the Nativity, the crucifixion and the Profits. Thirteenth century probably from Byzantine Roman Constantinople, present day Istanbul. Inv. OA 12442, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Christian relief Icon depicting scenes from the Nativity, A central ivory panel surrounded by beaten silver border. From Constantinople, 11th or 12th century. Inv. OA 11399, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval ivory relief panel from a diptych depicting a triumphant Byzantine Roman Emperor, probably Justinian. From Constantinople, 6th century. Inv. OA 9063, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Christian ivory diptych depicting the Nativity, the crucifixion and the Profits. Thirteenth century probably from Byzantine Roman Constantinople, present day Istanbul. Inv. OA 12442, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Medieval Christian relief Icon depicting scenes from the Nativity, A central ivory panel surrounded by beaten silver border. From Constantinople, 11th or 12th century. Inv. OA 11399, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Christian relief Icon depicting scenes from the Nativity, A central ivory panel surrounded by beaten silver border. From Constantinople, 11th or 12th century. Inv. OA 11399, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman mosaic of a Phoenix, From Daphne, a suburb of Antioch, Antakya, Turkey, 6th century AD. Marble blocks and glass paste cubes. The phoenix is a mythical bird associated with the sun. A phoenix obtains new life by arising from the ashes of its predecessor. The phoenix was subsequently adopted as a symbol in Early Christianity.In the mosaic it is perched rock above a background of rose buds and is bordered by a pair of facing rams. inv 3342, restored in 1936 by the Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of a Phoenix, From Daphne, a suburb of Antioch, Antakya, Turkey, 6th century AD. Marble blocks and glass paste cubes. The phoenix is a mythical bird associated with the sun. A phoenix obtains new life by arising from the ashes of its predecessor. The phoenix was subsequently adopted as a symbol in Early Christianity.In the mosaic it is perched rock above a background of rose buds and is bordered by a pair of facing rams. inv 3342, restored in 1936 by the Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of a Phoenix, From Daphne, a suburb of Antioch, Antakya, Turkey, 6th century AD. Marble blocks and glass paste cubes. The phoenix is a mythical bird associated with the sun. A phoenix obtains new life by arising from the ashes of its predecessor. The phoenix was subsequently adopted as a symbol in Early Christianity.In the mosaic it is perched rock above a background of rose buds and is bordered by a pair of facing rams. inv 3342, restored in 1936 by the Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of a Phoenix, From Daphne, a suburb of Antioch, Antakya, Turkey, 6th century AD. Marble blocks and glass paste cubes. The phoenix is a mythical bird associated with the sun. A phoenix obtains new life by arising from the ashes of its predecessor. The phoenix was subsequently adopted as a symbol in Early Christianity.In the mosaic it is perched rock above a background of rose buds and is bordered by a pair of facing rams. inv 3342, restored in 1936 by the Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of a Phoenix, From Daphne, a suburb of Antioch, Antakya, Turkey, 6th century AD. Marble blocks and glass paste cubes. The phoenix is a mythical bird associated with the sun. A phoenix obtains new life by arising from the ashes of its predecessor. The phoenix was subsequently adopted as a symbol in Early Christianity.In the mosaic it is perched rock above a background of rose buds and is bordered by a pair of facing rams. inv 3342, restored in 1936 by the Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of a Phoenix, From Daphne, a suburb of Antioch, Antakya, Turkey, 6th century AD. Marble blocks and glass paste cubes. The phoenix is a mythical bird associated with the sun. A phoenix obtains new life by arising from the ashes of its predecessor. The phoenix was subsequently adopted as a symbol in Early Christianity.In the mosaic it is perched rock above a background of rose buds and is bordered by a pair of facing rams. inv 3342, restored in 1936 by the Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of a Phoenix, From Daphne, a suburb of Antioch, Antakya, Turkey, 6th century AD. Marble blocks and glass paste cubes. The phoenix is a mythical bird associated with the sun. A phoenix obtains new life by arising from the ashes of its predecessor. The phoenix was subsequently adopted as a symbol in Early Christianity.In the mosaic it is perched rock above a background of rose buds and is bordered by a pair of facing rams. inv 3342, restored in 1936 by the Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of a Phoenix, From Daphne, a suburb of Antioch, Antakya, Turkey, 6th century AD. Marble blocks and glass paste cubes. The phoenix is a mythical bird associated with the sun. A phoenix obtains new life by arising from the ashes of its predecessor. The phoenix was subsequently adopted as a symbol in Early Christianity.In the mosaic it is perched rock above a background of rose buds and is bordered by a pair of facing rams. inv 3342, restored in 1936 by the Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of a Phoenix, From Daphne, a suburb of Antioch, Antakya, Turkey, 6th century AD. Marble blocks and glass paste cubes. The phoenix is a mythical bird associated with the sun. A phoenix obtains new life by arising from the ashes of its predecessor. The phoenix was subsequently adopted as a symbol in Early Christianity.In the mosaic it is perched rock above a background of rose buds and is bordered by a pair of facing rams. inv 3342, restored in 1936 by the Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of a Phoenix, From Daphne, a suburb of Antioch, Antakya, Turkey, 6th century AD. Marble blocks and glass paste cubes. The phoenix is a mythical bird associated with the sun. A phoenix obtains new life by arising from the ashes of its predecessor. The phoenix was subsequently adopted as a symbol in Early Christianity.In the mosaic it is perched rock above a background of rose buds and is bordered by a pair of facing rams. inv 3342, restored in 1936 by the Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of a Phoenix, From Daphne, a suburb of Antioch, Antakya, Turkey, 6th century AD. Marble blocks and glass paste cubes. The phoenix is a mythical bird associated with the sun. A phoenix obtains new life by arising from the ashes of its predecessor. The phoenix was subsequently adopted as a symbol in Early Christianity.In the mosaic it is perched rock above a background of rose buds and is bordered by a pair of facing rams. inv 3342, restored in 1936 by the Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of a Phoenix, From Daphne, a suburb of Antioch, Antakya, Turkey, 6th century AD. Marble blocks and glass paste cubes. The phoenix is a mythical bird associated with the sun. A phoenix obtains new life by arising from the ashes of its predecessor. The phoenix was subsequently adopted as a symbol in Early Christianity.In the mosaic it is perched rock above a background of rose buds and is bordered by a pair of facing rams. inv 3342, restored in 1936 by the Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of a Phoenix, From Daphne, a suburb of Antioch, Antakya, Turkey, 6th century AD. Marble blocks and glass paste cubes. The phoenix is a mythical bird associated with the sun. A phoenix obtains new life by arising from the ashes of its predecessor. The phoenix was subsequently adopted as a symbol in Early Christianity.In the mosaic it is perched rock above a background of rose buds and is bordered by a pair of facing rams. inv 3342, restored in 1936 by the Louvre Museum, Paris
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. v
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - Noah letting the animals out - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - The Sacrifice of Isaac - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - Rebecca waters Abrahams camels - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale- Building the Tower of Babel  - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale- Jacob steals the blessing of his father intended for Esau- Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible of the building o the Tower of Babel in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible about Noah  in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics of Jesus Christ in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics of Jesus Christ in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics of Jesus Christ in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics of Jesus Christ in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics of Jesus Christ in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics of Jesus Christ in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics of Jesus Christ in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics of Jesus Christ in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Main Isle and altar wioth Byzantine mosaics  in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Main Isle and altar wioth Byzantine mosaics  in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Main Isle and altar wioth Byzantine mosaics  in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Main Isle and altar wioth Byzantine mosaics  in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Main Isle and altar wioth Byzantine mosaics  in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Mosaic panel depicting The sacrifice of Isaac.  Byzantine Roman mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna, Italy. Mosaic decoration paid for by Emperor Justinian I in 547. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Apse mosaic depicting a clean shaven Christ, Byzantine Roman mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna, Italy. Mosaic decoration paid for by Emperor Justinian I in 547. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Mosaic panel depicting The sacrifice of Isaac.  Byzantine Roman mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna, Italy. Mosaic decoration paid for by Emperor Justinian I in 547. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Mosaic panel depicting The sacrifice of Isaac.  Byzantine Roman mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna, Italy. Mosaic decoration paid for by Emperor Justinian I in 547. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Fifth Century Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine  funerary mosaic from Mezghani Christian necropolis mounds in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis , (Tunisian Sfax) dedicated to Priscianus. Above the memorial text is the Constantinian monogram depicting the Christian Chi-Rho symbol used by the Roman emperor Constantine I as part of his military standard (vexillum). The layout of the mosaic is typical of those excavated in the Sfax region from this period.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting the building of the tower of Babel in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Decorative roof beams of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting Abraham about to sacrifice Isaac in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting the building of the tower of Babel in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Christ Pantocrator mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Christ Pantocrator mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Christ Pantocrator mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Christ Pantocrator mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Christ Pantocrator mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Christ Pantocrator mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Christ Pantocrator mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Christ Pantocrator mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Christ Pantocrator mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Christ Pantocrator mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Christ Pantocrator mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Christ Pantocrator mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Christ Pantocrator mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Christ Pantocrator mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Christ Pantocrator mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Christ Pantocrator mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting the building of the tower of Babel in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Decorative roof beams of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting Abraham about to sacrifice Isaac in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting the building of the tower of Babel in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics of the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • South wall mosaics depicting the bibliacl story of Noah in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.

FunkyStock Picture Library Resource

Picture The Past

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FunkyStock Picture Library free resource for professional editorial picture editors, picture researchers, historical scholars and students and enthusiasts who want to browse some of the best pictures and images of historic countries, historical places, archaeological sites and the very best museum antiquities and artefacts exhibits in Europe and the Middle East.

Pictures and Images can be downloaded or bought as stock photos or photo art prints.

COUNTRIES

Browse travel pictures and images of historic places and archaeological sites of countries in Europe and the Middle East.

VIEW COUNTRIES INDEX....

HISTORICAL

Explore the past through pictures and images of its historic places. See the great palaces, castles and cities of antiquity as well as the great archaeological sites where our ancestors made history.

EXPLORE HISTORICAL PLACES...

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Browse pictures & images the treasured artefacts and antiquities exhibits from the great Museum of Europe and the Middle East. See the art and objects made by our ancestors.

SEE MUESEUM ANTIQUITIES....