• Reconstucted Byzantine style frescos of the 4th century AD 3 aisled Roamnesque basilica of Saint Demetrius, or Hagios Demetrios, Άγιος Δημήτριος, a Palaeochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Reconstucted Byzantine style frescos of the 4th century AD 3 aisled Roamnesque basilica of Saint Demetrius, or Hagios Demetrios,  , a Palaeochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Interior of the Byzantine Orthodox monastery of Pantanassa , showing Byzantine frescos & Icons,  Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Reconstucted Byzantine style frescos of the 4th century AD 3 aisled Roamnesque basilica of Saint Demetrius, or Hagios Demetrios, Άγιος Δημήτριος, a Palaeochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Reconstucted Byzantine style frescos of the 4th century AD 3 aisled Roamnesque basilica of Saint Demetrius, or Hagios Demetrios, Άγιος Δημήτριος, a Palaeochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Reconstucted Byzantine style frescos of the 4th century AD 3 aisled Roamnesque basilica of Saint Demetrius, or Hagios Demetrios, Άγιος Δημήτριος, a Palaeochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Picture and image of the interior of the Byzantine Romanesque church of Santa Sabina at Santa Sabina Nuragic archaeological site, Middle Bronze age , Silanus ,  Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the Byzantine Romanesque church of Santa Sabina at Santa Sabina Nuragic archaeological site, Middle Bronze age , Silanus ,  Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the Byzantine Romanesque church of Santa Sabina at Santa Sabina Nuragic archaeological site, Middle Bronze age , Silanus ,  Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the Byzantine Romanesque church of Santa Sabina at Santa Sabina Nuragic archaeological site, Middle Bronze age , Silanus ,  Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the Byzantine Romanesque church of Santa Sabina at Santa Sabina Nuragic archaeological site, Middle Bronze age , Silanus ,  Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the Byzantine Romanesque church of Santa Sabina at Santa Sabina Nuragic archaeological site, Middle Bronze age , Silanus ,  Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the Byzantine Romanesque church of Santa Sabina at Santa Sabina Nuragic archaeological site, Middle Bronze age , Silanus ,  Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the Byzantine Romanesque church of Santa Sabina at Santa Sabina Nuragic archaeological site, Middle Bronze age , Silanus ,  Sardinia.
  • Reconstucted Byzantine style frescos of the 4th century AD 3 aisled Roamnesque basilica of Saint Demetrius, or Hagios Demetrios,  , a Palaeochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Reconstucted Byzantine style frescos of the 4th century AD 3 aisled Roamnesque basilica of Saint Demetrius, or Hagios Demetrios,  , a Palaeochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Reconstucted Byzantine style frescos of the 4th century AD 3 aisled Roamnesque basilica of Saint Demetrius, or Hagios Demetrios,  , a Palaeochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Reconstucted Byzantine style frescos of the 4th century AD 3 aisled Roamnesque basilica of Saint Demetrius, or Hagios Demetrios,  , a Palaeochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Reconstucted Byzantine style frescos of the 4th century AD 3 aisled Roamnesque basilica of Saint Demetrius, or Hagios Demetrios,  , a Palaeochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Reconstucted Byzantine style frescos of the 4th century AD 3 aisled Roamnesque basilica of Saint Demetrius, or Hagios Demetrios,  , a Palaeochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Reconstucted Byzantine style frescos of the 4th century AD 3 aisled Roamnesque basilica of Saint Demetrius, or Hagios Demetrios,  , a Palaeochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Reconstucted Byzantine style frescos of the 4th century AD 3 aisled Roamnesque basilica of Saint Demetrius, or Hagios Demetrios,  , a Palaeochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Reconstucted Byzantine style frescos of the 4th century AD 3 aisled Roamnesque basilica of Saint Demetrius, or Hagios Demetrios,  , a Palaeochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Interior of the Byzantine Orthodox monastery of Pantanassa , showing Byzantine frescos & Icons,  Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Interior of the Byzantine Orthodox monastery of Pantanassa , showing Byzantine frescos & Icons,  Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Interior of the Byzantine Orthodox monastery of Pantanassa , showing Byzantine frescos & Icons,  Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • The Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine memorial funerary mosaic of an un-named man described as gentle and depicted with a bushel used to measure grain from the public grain warehouse. On its side is teh Chi Rho symbols used by early Christians to represent Christ.  Thabarca, Tabarks, 5th Century AD, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • The Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine memorial funerary mosaic for Crescentia. <br />
Above the funerary portrait of Crescentia are the words: ‘Crescentia, innocent and in Peace’. Crescentia is dressed in a dalmatic, a long wide-sleeved tunic, with a belt around the waiste and a neclace around her neck. Lit candles represent eternal life. 5th century AD from the western necropolis of Thabraca, Tabarka, Tunisia, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • The Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine memorial funerary mosaic for Crescentia. <br />
Above the funerary portrait of Crescentia are the words: ‘Crescentia, innocent and in Peace’. Crescentia is dressed in a dalmatic, a long wide-sleeved tunic, with a belt around the waiste and a neclace around her neck. Lit candles represent eternal life. 5th century AD from the western necropolis of Thabraca, Tabarka, Tunisia, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic of Matziceus, a Libyan, with the inscription reading: ‘the faithful Matziceus lived in peace for 42 years, rested (died) on the fifteenth of the calends of June’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with vines which grow out of a cantharus, a Greek style drinking cup, which represents the fountain of life.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the Parish church of Demna, left AisleBardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • Exterior of the rare 12th Century Greek Orthodox Byzantine Church of the Ayioi Apstoloi ????? ?????????, Holy Apostles)  Katomeria, Kea, Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Exterior of the rare 12th Century Greek Orthodox Byzantine Church of the Ayioi Apstoloi ????? ?????????, Holy Apostles)  Katomeria, Kea, Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Icons in the 4th century AD Church of Saint Demetrius, or Hagios Demetrios, Άγιος Δημήτριος, a Palaeochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Sixth century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian walk in Baptismal font made from marble. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • Sixth century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian walk in Baptismal font made from marble. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century  Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. v
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additio-nal details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a grey art background.
  • The Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine memorial funerary mosaic of a father and daughter, the father is sitting at a bankers desk. Thabarca, Tabarks, 5th Century AD, Bardo Museum, Tunis.
  • The Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine memorial funerary mosaic of a father and daughter, the father is sitting at a bankers desk. Thabarca, Tabarks, 5th Century AD, Bardo Museum, Tunis. White background
  • The Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine memorial funerary mosaic of a father and daughter, the father is sitting at a bankers desk. Thabarca, Tabarks, 5th Century AD, Bardo Museum, Tunis. Grey background
  • The Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine memorial funerary mosaic of a father and daughter, the father is sitting at a bankers desk. Thabarca, Tabarks, 5th Century AD, Bardo Museum, Tunis. Black background
  • The Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine memorial funerary mosaic of an un-named man described as gentle and depicted with a bushel used to measure grain from the public grain warehouse. On its side is teh Chi Rho symbols used by early Christians to represent Christ.  Thabarca, Tabarks, 5th Century AD, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • The Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine memorial funerary mosaic of an un-named man described as gentle and depicted with a bushel used to measure grain from the public grain warehouse. On its side is teh Chi Rho symbols used by early Christians to represent Christ.  Thabarca, Tabarks, 5th Century AD, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • The Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine memorial funerary mosaic for Felicitas and Victoria. <br />
<br />
A mosaic depiction of a female decorates the grave of  Felicitas and Victoria which bears their inscription and that they departed in peace. Lit candles representing eturnal life and birds are also depicted on the funerary panel.<br />
<br />
5th century AD from the western necropolis of Thabraca, Tabarka, Tunisia, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • The Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine memorial funerary mosaic of an un-named man described as gentle and depicted with a bushel used to measure grain from the public grain warehouse. On its side is teh Chi Rho symbols used by early Christians to represent Christ.  Thabarca, Tabarks, 5th Century AD, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • The Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine memorial funerary mosaic of an un-named man described as gentle and depicted with a bushel used to measure grain from the public grain warehouse. On its side is teh Chi Rho symbols used by early Christians to represent Christ.  Thabarca, Tabarks, 5th Century AD, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • The Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine memorial funerary mosaic for Felicitas and Victoria. <br />
<br />
A mosaic depiction of a female decorates the grave of  Felicitas and Victoria which bears their inscription and that they departed in peace. Lit candles representing eturnal life and birds are also depicted on the funerary panel.<br />
<br />
5th century AD from the western necropolis of Thabraca, Tabarka, Tunisia, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • The Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine memorial funerary mosaic for Felicitas and Victoria. <br />
<br />
A mosaic depiction of a female decorates the grave of  Felicitas and Victoria which bears their inscription and that they departed in peace. Lit candles representing eturnal life and birds are also depicted on the funerary panel.<br />
<br />
5th century AD from the western necropolis of Thabraca, Tabarka, Tunisia, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • The Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine memorial funerary mosaic for Felicitas and Victoria. <br />
<br />
A mosaic depiction of a female decorates the grave of  Felicitas and Victoria which bears their inscription and that they departed in peace. Lit candles representing eturnal life and birds are also depicted on the funerary panel.<br />
<br />
5th century AD from the western necropolis of Thabraca, Tabarka, Tunisia, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • The Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine memorial funerary mosaic for Crescentia. <br />
Above the funerary portrait of Crescentia are the words: ‘Crescentia, innocent and in Peace’. Crescentia is dressed in a dalmatic, a long wide-sleeved tunic, with a belt around the waiste and a neclace around her neck. Lit candles represent eternal life. 5th century AD from the western necropolis of Thabraca, Tabarka, Tunisia, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • The Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine memorial funerary mosaic for Crescentia. <br />
Above the funerary portrait of Crescentia are the words: ‘Crescentia, innocent and in Peace’. Crescentia is dressed in a dalmatic, a long wide-sleeved tunic, with a belt around the waiste and a neclace around her neck. Lit candles represent eternal life. 5th century AD from the western necropolis of Thabraca, Tabarka, Tunisia, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic for Natalica the inscription reading: ‘(our) beloved daughter Natalica lived 10 years 8 months 21 days, rested the 8th Ides of October (23rd) ’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with a crescent laurel leaves against a black background and a cross encircling the head of a depiction of Natalica. She is wearing earnings and is dressed in a dalmatic, a long wide-sleeved tunic, which is decorated with black clavi, stripes, and embroidered sleeves. A belt and buckle with cabochons, shaped and polished gem stones, hold the tunic tight at the waste.  Either side of t Natalica are two lit candles, the symbols of eternity.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the funerary enclosure which is in the Northwest enclosure of the Acholla site, Tunisia. Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic for Natalica the inscription reading: ‘(our) beloved daughter Natalica lived 10 years 8 months 21 days, rested the 8th Ides of October (23rd) ’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with a crescent laurel leaves against a black background and a cross encircling the head of a depiction of Natalica. She is wearing earnings and is dressed in a dalmatic, a long wide-sleeved tunic, which is decorated with black clavi, stripes, and embroidered sleeves. A belt and buckle with cabochons, shaped and polished gem stones, hold the tunic tight at the waste.  Either side of t Natalica are two lit candles, the symbols of eternity.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the funerary enclosure which is in the Northwest enclosure of the Acholla site, Tunisia. Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic for Natalica the inscription reading: ‘(our) beloved daughter Natalica lived 10 years 8 months 21 days, rested the 8th Ides of October (23rd) ’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with a crescent laurel leaves against a black background and a cross encircling the head of a depiction of Natalica. She is wearing earnings and is dressed in a dalmatic, a long wide-sleeved tunic, which is decorated with black clavi, stripes, and embroidered sleeves. A belt and buckle with cabochons, shaped and polished gem stones, hold the tunic tight at the waste.  Either side of t Natalica are two lit candles, the symbols of eternity.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the funerary enclosure which is in the Northwest enclosure of the Acholla site, Tunisia. Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic for Natalica the inscription reading: ‘(our) beloved daughter Natalica lived 10 years 8 months 21 days, rested the 8th Ides of October (23rd) ’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with a crescent laurel leaves against a black background and a cross encircling the head of a depiction of Natalica. She is wearing earnings and is dressed in a dalmatic, a long wide-sleeved tunic, which is decorated with black clavi, stripes, and embroidered sleeves. A belt and buckle with cabochons, shaped and polished gem stones, hold the tunic tight at the waste.  Either side of t Natalica are two lit candles, the symbols of eternity.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the funerary enclosure which is in the Northwest enclosure of the Acholla site, Tunisia. Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic of Matziceus, a Libyan, with the inscription reading: ‘the faithful Matziceus lived in peace for 42 years, rested (died) on the fifteenth of the calends of June’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with vines which grow out of a cantharus, a Greek style drinking cup, which represents the fountain of life.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the Parish church of Demna, left AisleBardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic of Matziceus, a Libyan, with the inscription reading: ‘the faithful Matziceus lived in peace for 42 years, rested (died) on the fifteenth of the calends of June’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with vines which grow out of a cantharus, a Greek style drinking cup, which represents the fountain of life.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the Parish church of Demna, left AisleBardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic of Matziceus, a Libyan, with the inscription reading: ‘the faithful Matziceus lived in peace for 42 years, rested (died) on the fifteenth of the calends of June’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with vines which grow out of a cantharus, a Greek style drinking cup, which represents the fountain of life.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the Parish church of Demna, left AisleBardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • Eastern Roman Byzantine walk in baptismal font from the 6th century AD Parish Church of Demna near Kalibia, Cape Bon, Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The baptismal font was removed from the church and restored in the Bardo Museum Tunis in 1955. <br />
<br />
The mosaic iconographic decorations represent the salvation of the neophyte, newcomer, who by being baptised is admitted into the Church of Christ whilst being illuminated by faith, represented the mosaic lit candle illustrations.<br />
<br />
The P with a cross through it is the Chi Rho, a Christian symbol which represent the first two letters of Jesus Christ's name in Greek. The Christogram also has the Greek letters Alpha and Omega which represent the passage from the book of revelations: “I am the Alpha and Omega" Chapter 1 verse 8, which is clarified by "the beginning and the end" (Revelation 21:6, 22:13). <br />
<br />
In these type of baptismal fonts those being baptised would have been fully immersed in water as John the Baptist immersed Jesus. <br />
<br />
The font was paid for by donation by Iuliana and Aquinius who dedicated the font to St Cyprian, the martyed Bishop of Carthage, circa 258,  and the author of a treatise on baptism rites<br />
<br />
The Bardo Museum Tunis
  • North African Christian mosaic fragment from the ambulatory, cloister,  of the pilgrimage church of Bir Ftouha, Cathage, Tunisia. The geometric mosaic deign is mad up of intersecting circlular medalions that enclose depictions of birds, roses and baskets. Eastern Roman Byzantine Era, Bardo Museum, Tunis
  • Eastern Roman Byzantine walk in baptismal font from the 6th century AD Parish Church of Demna near Kalibia, Cape Bon, Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The baptismal font was removed from the church and restored in the Bardo Museum Tunis in 1955. <br />
<br />
The mosaic iconographic decorations represent the salvation of the neophyte, newcomer, who by being baptised is admitted into the Church of Christ whilst being illuminated by faith, represented the mosaic lit candle illustrations.<br />
<br />
The P with a cross through it is the Chi Rho, a Christian symbol which represent the first two letters of Jesus Christ's name in Greek. The Christogram also has the Greek letters Alpha and Omega which represent the passage from the book of revelations: “I am the Alpha and Omega" Chapter 1 verse 8, which is clarified by "the beginning and the end" (Revelation 21:6, 22:13). <br />
<br />
In these type of baptismal fonts those being baptised would have been fully immersed in water as John the Baptist immersed Jesus. <br />
<br />
The font was paid for by donation by Iuliana and Aquinius who dedicated the font to St Cyprian, the martyed Bishop of Carthage, circa 258,  and the author of a treatise on baptism rites<br />
<br />
The Bardo Museum Tunis
  • Eastern Roman Byzantine walk in baptismal font from the 6th century AD Parish Church of Demna near Kalibia, Cape Bon, Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The baptismal font was removed from the church and restored in the Bardo Museum Tunis in 1955. <br />
<br />
The mosaic iconographic decorations represent the salvation of the neophyte, newcomer, who by being baptised is admitted into the Church of Christ whilst being illuminated by faith, represented the mosaic lit candle illustrations.<br />
<br />
The P with a cross through it is the Chi Rho, a Christian symbol which represent the first two letters of Jesus Christ's name in Greek. The Christogram also has the Greek letters Alpha and Omega which represent the passage from the book of revelations: “I am the Alpha and Omega" Chapter 1 verse 8, which is clarified by "the beginning and the end" (Revelation 21:6, 22:13). <br />
<br />
In these type of baptismal fonts those being baptised would have been fully immersed in water as John the Baptist immersed Jesus. <br />
<br />
The font was paid for by donation by Iuliana and Aquinius who dedicated the font to St Cyprian, the martyed Bishop of Carthage, circa 258,  and the author of a treatise on baptism rites<br />
<br />
The Bardo Museum Tunis
  • Eastern Roman Byzantine walk in baptismal font from the 6th century AD Parish Church of Demna near Kalibia, Cape Bon, Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The baptismal font was removed from the church and restored in the Bardo Museum Tunis in 1955. <br />
<br />
The mosaic iconographic decorations represent the salvation of the neophyte, newcomer, who by being baptised is admitted into the Church of Christ whilst being illuminated by faith, represented the mosaic lit candle illustrations.<br />
<br />
The P with a cross through it is the Chi Rho, a Christian symbol which represent the first two letters of Jesus Christ's name in Greek. The Christogram also has the Greek letters Alpha and Omega which represent the passage from the book of revelations: “I am the Alpha and Omega" Chapter 1 verse 8, which is clarified by "the beginning and the end" (Revelation 21:6, 22:13). <br />
<br />
In these type of baptismal fonts those being baptised would have been fully immersed in water as John the Baptist immersed Jesus. <br />
<br />
The font was paid for by donation by Iuliana and Aquinius who dedicated the font to St Cyprian, the martyed Bishop of Carthage, circa 258,  and the author of a treatise on baptism rites<br />
<br />
The Bardo Museum Tunis
  • Icons in the 4th century AD Church of Saint Demetrius, or Hagios Demetrios,  , a Palaeochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Icons in the 4th century AD Church of Saint Demetrius, or Hagios Demetrios,  , a Palaeochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Byzantine fresco of the church of  Saint Nicolas.   Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Byzantine fresco of the church of  Saint Nicolas.   Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Byzantine fresco of the church of  Saint Nicolas.   Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Byzantine fresco of the church of  Saint Nicolas.   Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • The exterior of the Byzantine Church of  Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • The cloisters of the Byzantine Metropolis Church , Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • The exterior of the Byzantine Metropolis Church , Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • The exterior of the Byzantine Metropolis Church , Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • The exterior of the Byzantine Metropolis Church , Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the Byzantine Othodox monastery of Pantanassa ,  Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the Byzantine Othodox monastery of Pantanassa ,  Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the Byzantine Othodox monastery of Pantanassa ,  Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Byzantine fresco of Christ on the cross in the church of  Saint Nicolas.   Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Byzantine fresco of the church of  Saint Nicolas.   Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Byzantine fresco of the church of  Saint Nicolas.   Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Byzantine fresco of the church of  Saint Nicolas.   Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Byzantine fresco of the church of  Saint Nicolas.   Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Byzantine fresco of the church of  Saint Nicolas.   Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Byzantine fresco of the church of  Saint Nicolas.   Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Byzantine fresco of the church of  Saint Nicolas.   Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Byzantine fresco of the church of  Saint Nicolas.   Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Byzantine fresco of the church of  Saint Nicolas.   Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Byzantine fresco of the church of  Saint Nicolas.   Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Byzantine fresco of the church of  Saint Nicolas.   Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Byzantine fresco of the church of  Saint Nicolas.   Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Byzantine fresco of the church of  Saint Nicolas.   Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Byzantine fresco of the church of  Saint Nicolas.   Mystras ,  Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Byzantine Frescos  of the church of the Metamorphosis, Paliachora,  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Byzantine Frescos  of the church of the Metamorphosis, Paliachora,  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Byzantine Frescos  of the church of the Metamorphosis, Paliachora,  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Byzantine Frescos  of the church of the Metamorphosis, Paliachora,  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Byzantine Frescos  of the church of the Metamorphosis, Paliachora,  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Byzantine Frescos  of the church of the Metamorphosis, Paliachora,  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Byzantine Frescos  of the church of the Metamorphosis, Paliachora,  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Byzantine Frescos  of the church of the Metamorphosis, Paliachora,  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Byzantine Frescos  of the church of the Metamorphosis, Paliachora,  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Byzantine Frescos  of the church of the Metamorphosis, Paliachora,  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Byzantine Frescos  of the church of the Metamorphosis, Paliachora,  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Byzantine Frescos  of the church of the Metamorphosis, Paliachora,  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Interior of the Byzantine church of the Metamorphosis, Paliachora,  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Interior of the Byzantine church of the Metamorphosis, Paliachora,  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Interior of the Byzantine church of the Metamorphosis, Paliachora,  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Rare 12th Century Greek Orthodox Byzantine Church of the Ayioi Apstoloi  Katomeria, Kea, Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Rare 12th Century Greek Orthodox Byzantine Fresco in the Church of the Ayioi Apstoloi  Katomeria, Kea, Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Rare 12th Century Greek Orthodox Byzantine Church of the Ayioi Apstoloi  Katomeria, Kea, Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Rare 12th Century Greek Orthodox Byzantine Church of the Ayioi Apstoloi  Katomeria, Kea, Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Rare 12th Century Greek Orthodox Byzantine Church of the Ayioi Apstoloi  Katomeria, Kea, Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Exterior of the rare 12th Century Greek Orthodox Byzantine Church of the Ayioi Apstoloi ????? ?????????, Holy Apostles)  Katomeria, Kea, Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Exterior of the rare 12th Century Greek Orthodox Byzantine Church of the Ayioi Apstoloi ????? ?????????, Holy Apostles)  Katomeria, Kea, Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Exterior of the rare 12th Century Greek Orthodox Byzantine Church of the Ayioi Apstoloi ????? ?????????, Holy Apostles)  Katomeria, Kea, Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Exterior of the rare 12th Century Greek Orthodox Byzantine Church of the Ayioi Apstoloi ????? ?????????, Holy Apostles)  Katomeria, Kea, Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Exterior of the rare 12th Century Greek Orthodox Byzantine Church of the Ayioi Apstoloi ????? ?????????, Holy Apostles)  Katomeria, Kea, Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Exterior of the rare 12th Century Greek Orthodox Byzantine Church of the Ayioi Apstoloi ????? ?????????, Holy Apostles)  Katomeria, Kea, Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale- Jacob steals the blessing of his father intended for Esau- Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - Noah letting the animals out - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - The Sacrifice of Isaac - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale - Rebecca waters Abrahams camels - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale- Building the Tower of Babel  - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible of the building o the Tower of Babel in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible about Noah  in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics of Jesus Christ in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics of Jesus Christ in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics of Jesus Christ in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics of Jesus Christ in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics of Jesus Christ in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics of Jesus Christ in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics of Jesus Christ in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Byzantine mosaics of Jesus Christ in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Main Isle and altar wioth Byzantine mosaics  in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Main Isle and altar wioth Byzantine mosaics  in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Main Isle and altar wioth Byzantine mosaics  in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Main Isle and altar wioth Byzantine mosaics  in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Main Isle and altar wioth Byzantine mosaics  in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Noah putting animals into the arc, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Rebecca and Abraham  Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of with a depiction of Christ Pantocrator on the apse and main altar, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Noah's Arc, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Noah building the arc, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of with a depiction of Christ Pantocrator on the apse and main altar, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Christian scene with Christ and the angels, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Rebecca and Abraham, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Adam & Eve A the Serpant, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Abraham about to sacrifice  Ishmael, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Angels appearing to Abraham, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Noahs Sons rebuilding their home, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of biblical senes, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of God appearing to Noah, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Noah's Arc, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of with a depiction of Christ Pantocrator on the apse and main altar, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Christian scene with Christ and the angels, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Noah putting animals into the arc, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Noah building the arc, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Rebecca and Abraham, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Rebecca and Abraham  Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Adam & Eve A the Serpant, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Angels appearing to Abraham, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Abraham about to sacrifice  Ishmael, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of God appearing to Noah, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Noahs Sons rebuilding their home, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of biblical senes, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Byzantine mosaics at the Palatine Chapel ( Capella Palatina ) Norman Palace Palermo, Sicily, Italy. Christ above the Alter.
  • Byzantine mosaics at the Palatine Chapel ( Capella Palatina ) Norman Palace Palermo, Sicily, Italy. Christ above the Alter.
  • Byzantine mosaic of Tabitha being raised from the dead by Saint Peter. Tabitha is adorned with the garments she had woven for some widows and had given to them as charity. The Palatine Chapel, Norman Palace, Sicily travel photos & pictures available as stock photos, pictures & images & also to download as photo art prints.
  • Byzantine Christian Mosaics of The Palatine Chapel  ( Capella Palatina) in The Norman Palace (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily. Scenes of Christ and from the Bible.
  • Byzantine Christian Mosaics of The Palatine Chapel  ( Capella Palatina) in The Norman Palace (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily. Scenes of Christ and from the Bible.
  • Byzantine Christian Mosaics of The Palatine Chapel  ( Capella Palatina) in The Norman Palace (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily. Scenes of Christ and from the Bible.
  • Byzantine Christian Mosaics of The Palatine Chapel  ( Capella Palatina) in The Norman Palace (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily
  • Byzantine mosaics at the Palatine Chapel ( Capella Palatina ) Norman Palace Palermo, Sicily, It. Noah's Arc.
  • Byzantine mosaics at the Palatine Chapel ( Capella Palatina ) Norman Palace Palermo, Sicily, It
  • Byzantine mosaics at the Palatine Chapel ( Capella Palatina ) Norman Palace Palermo, Sicily, Ittaly. Building the tower of Babel.
  • Byzantine mosaics at the Palatine Chapel ( Capella Palatina ) Norman Palace Palermo, Sicily, Italy. St Paul.
  • Byzantine mosaics at the Palatine Chapel ( Capella Palatina ) Norman Palace Palermo, Sicily, Italy. Christ with Saint Peter and Paul abouve the throne stage.
  • Byzantine mosaics at the Palatine Chapel ( Capella Palatina ) Norman Palace Palermo, Sicily, Italy. Christ in the ceiling dome with the angels.

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Pictures and Images can be downloaded or bought as stock photos or photo art prints.

COUNTRIES

Browse travel pictures and images of historic places and archaeological sites of countries in Europe and the Middle East.

VIEW COUNTRIES INDEX....

HISTORICAL

Explore the past through pictures and images of its historic places. See the great palaces, castles and cities of antiquity as well as the great archaeological sites where our ancestors made history.

EXPLORE HISTORICAL PLACES...

MUSEUMS

Browse pictures & images the treasured artefacts and antiquities exhibits from the great Museum of Europe and the Middle East. See the art and objects made by our ancestors.

SEE MUESEUM ANTIQUITIES....