• Cape gooseberry
  • Fresh cape gooseberry against white background
  • Fresh Incan Berry - also known as Cape Gooseberry, agauaymanto berries or Goldenberries. source of Vitamin P and bioflavinoids
  • Dried Incan Berry - also known as Cape Gooseberry, agauaymanto berries or Goldenberries. source of Vitamin P and bioflavinoids
  • Dried Incan Berry - also known as Cape Gooseberry, agauaymanto berries or Goldenberries. source of Vitamin P and bioflavinoids
  • Dried Incan Berry - also known as Cape Gooseberry, agauaymanto berries or Goldenberries. source of Vitamin P and bioflavinoids
  • Zlati Rat ( Golden Cape  beach ) Bra? island, Croatia
  • Zlati Rat ( Golden Cape  beach ) Bra? island, Croatia
  • Photo of a Three handles "Palace Style" amphora with three large octopuses within a marines cape of rocks and seaweed. A mycenaean copy of a Minoan Marine Style.   Mycenae tomb 2, Greece. 15th century BC,  cat no: 6725, National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • Photo of a Three handles "Palace Style" amphora with three large octopuses within a marines cape of rocks and seaweed. A mycenaean copy of a Minoan Marine Style.   Mycenae tomb 2, Greece. 15th century BC,  cat no: 6725, National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • Photo of a Three handles "Palace Style" amphora with three large octopuses within a marines cape of rocks and seaweed. A mycenaean copy of a Minoan Marine Style.   Mycenae tomb 2, Greece. 15th century BC,  cat no: 6725, National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • Photo of a Three handles "Palace Style" amphora with three large octopuses within a marines cape of rocks and seaweed. A mycenaean copy of a Minoan Marine Style.   Mycenae tomb 2, Greece. 15th century BC,  cat no: 6725, National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • Photo of a Three handles "Palace Style" amphora with three large octopuses within a marines cape of rocks and seaweed. A mycenaean copy of a Minoan Marine Style.   Mycenae tomb 2, Greece. 15th century BC,  cat no: 6725, National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • Photo of a Three handles "Palace Style" amphora with three large octopuses within a marines cape of rocks and seaweed. A mycenaean copy of a Minoan Marine Style.   Mycenae tomb 2, Greece. 15th century BC,  cat no: 6725, National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Eastern Roman Byzantine walk in baptismal font from the 6th century AD Parish Church of Demna near Kalibia, Cape Bon, Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The baptismal font was removed from the church and restored in the Bardo Museum Tunis in 1955. <br />
<br />
The mosaic iconographic decorations represent the salvation of the neophyte, newcomer, who by being baptised is admitted into the Church of Christ whilst being illuminated by faith, represented the mosaic lit candle illustrations.<br />
<br />
The P with a cross through it is the Chi Rho, a Christian symbol which represent the first two letters of Jesus Christ's name in Greek. The Christogram also has the Greek letters Alpha and Omega which represent the passage from the book of revelations: “I am the Alpha and Omega" Chapter 1 verse 8, which is clarified by "the beginning and the end" (Revelation 21:6, 22:13). <br />
<br />
In these type of baptismal fonts those being baptised would have been fully immersed in water as John the Baptist immersed Jesus. <br />
<br />
The font was paid for by donation by Iuliana and Aquinius who dedicated the font to St Cyprian, the martyed Bishop of Carthage, circa 258,  and the author of a treatise on baptism rites<br />
<br />
The Bardo Museum Tunis
  • Eastern Roman Byzantine walk in baptismal font from the 6th century AD Parish Church of Demna near Kalibia, Cape Bon, Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The baptismal font was removed from the church and restored in the Bardo Museum Tunis in 1955. <br />
<br />
The mosaic iconographic decorations represent the salvation of the neophyte, newcomer, who by being baptised is admitted into the Church of Christ whilst being illuminated by faith, represented the mosaic lit candle illustrations.<br />
<br />
The P with a cross through it is the Chi Rho, a Christian symbol which represent the first two letters of Jesus Christ's name in Greek. The Christogram also has the Greek letters Alpha and Omega which represent the passage from the book of revelations: “I am the Alpha and Omega" Chapter 1 verse 8, which is clarified by "the beginning and the end" (Revelation 21:6, 22:13). <br />
<br />
In these type of baptismal fonts those being baptised would have been fully immersed in water as John the Baptist immersed Jesus. <br />
<br />
The font was paid for by donation by Iuliana and Aquinius who dedicated the font to St Cyprian, the martyed Bishop of Carthage, circa 258,  and the author of a treatise on baptism rites<br />
<br />
The Bardo Museum Tunis
  • Eastern Roman Byzantine walk in baptismal font from the 6th century AD Parish Church of Demna near Kalibia, Cape Bon, Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The baptismal font was removed from the church and restored in the Bardo Museum Tunis in 1955. <br />
<br />
The mosaic iconographic decorations represent the salvation of the neophyte, newcomer, who by being baptised is admitted into the Church of Christ whilst being illuminated by faith, represented the mosaic lit candle illustrations.<br />
<br />
The P with a cross through it is the Chi Rho, a Christian symbol which represent the first two letters of Jesus Christ's name in Greek. The Christogram also has the Greek letters Alpha and Omega which represent the passage from the book of revelations: “I am the Alpha and Omega" Chapter 1 verse 8, which is clarified by "the beginning and the end" (Revelation 21:6, 22:13). <br />
<br />
In these type of baptismal fonts those being baptised would have been fully immersed in water as John the Baptist immersed Jesus. <br />
<br />
The font was paid for by donation by Iuliana and Aquinius who dedicated the font to St Cyprian, the martyed Bishop of Carthage, circa 258,  and the author of a treatise on baptism rites<br />
<br />
The Bardo Museum Tunis
  • Eastern Roman Byzantine walk in baptismal font from the 6th century AD Parish Church of Demna near Kalibia, Cape Bon, Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The baptismal font was removed from the church and restored in the Bardo Museum Tunis in 1955. <br />
<br />
The mosaic iconographic decorations represent the salvation of the neophyte, newcomer, who by being baptised is admitted into the Church of Christ whilst being illuminated by faith, represented the mosaic lit candle illustrations.<br />
<br />
The P with a cross through it is the Chi Rho, a Christian symbol which represent the first two letters of Jesus Christ's name in Greek. The Christogram also has the Greek letters Alpha and Omega which represent the passage from the book of revelations: “I am the Alpha and Omega" Chapter 1 verse 8, which is clarified by "the beginning and the end" (Revelation 21:6, 22:13). <br />
<br />
In these type of baptismal fonts those being baptised would have been fully immersed in water as John the Baptist immersed Jesus. <br />
<br />
The font was paid for by donation by Iuliana and Aquinius who dedicated the font to St Cyprian, the martyed Bishop of Carthage, circa 258,  and the author of a treatise on baptism rites<br />
<br />
The Bardo Museum Tunis
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Gothic Catalan altarpiece depicting the Madonna of Mercy by Bonant Zaortiga, circa 1430-1440, tempera and gold leaf on wood, from the church of Mare de Dieu de Carrasca , Blancas, Terol, Spain. Against a white background.<br />
Bonnat Zaortiga was one of the most prominent representatives of the international Gothic. The Mother of God of Mercy  protects humans with her cape, symbolizing one of the most feared evils of the European Middle Ages, plague, often understood as a punishment for the sins of mankind. This was the central panel of the altarpiece of the church of the Mother of God. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC 3945.
  • Gothic Catalan altarpiece depicting the Madonna of Mercy by Bonant Zaortiga, circa 1430-1440, tempera and gold leaf on wood, from the church of Mare de Dieu de Carrasca , Blancas, Terol, Spain. Against a black background. <br />
Bonnat Zaortiga was one of the most prominent representatives of the international Gothic. The Mother of God of Mercy  protects humans with her cape, symbolizing one of the most feared evils of the European Middle Ages, plague, often understood as a punishment for the sins of mankind. This was the central panel of the altarpiece of the church of the Mother of God. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC 3945.
  • Gothic Catalan altarpiece depicting the Madonna of Mercy by Bonant Zaortiga, circa 1430-1440, tempera and gold leaf on wood, from the church of Mare de Dieu de Carrasca , Blancas, Terol, Spain<br />
Bonnat Zaortiga was one of the most prominent representatives of the international Gothic. The Mother of God of Mercy  protects humans with her cape, symbolizing one of the most feared evils of the European Middle Ages, plague, often understood as a punishment for the sins of mankind. This was the central panel of the altarpiece of the church of the Mother of God. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC 3945.
  • Gothic Catalan altarpiece depicting the Madonna of Mercy by Bonant Zaortiga, circa 1430-1440, tempera and gold leaf on wood, from the church of Mare de Dieu de Carrasca , Blancas, Terol, Spain. Against a art background. <br />
Bonnat Zaortiga was one of the most prominent representatives of the international Gothic. The Mother of God of Mercy  protects humans with her cape, symbolizing one of the most feared evils of the European Middle Ages, plague, often understood as a punishment for the sins of mankind. This was the central panel of the altarpiece of the church of the Mother of God. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC 3945.
  • Gothic Catalan altarpiece depicting the Madonna of Mercy by Bonant Zaortiga, circa 1430-1440, tempera and gold leaf on wood, from the church of Mare de Dieu de Carrasca , Blancas, Terol, Spain. Against a grey art background. <br />
Bonnat Zaortiga was one of the most prominent representatives of the international Gothic. The Mother of God of Mercy  protects humans with her cape, symbolizing one of the most feared evils of the European Middle Ages, plague, often understood as a punishment for the sins of mankind. This was the central panel of the altarpiece of the church of the Mother of God. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC 3945.
  • Gothic Catalan altar piece depicting the Madonna of Mercy by Bonant Zaortiga, circa 1430-1440, tempera and gold leaf on wood, from the church of Mare de Dieu de Carrasca , Blancas, Terol, Spain<br />
Bonnat Zaortiga was one of the most prominent representatives of the international Gothic. The Mother of God of Mercy  protects humans with her cape, symbolising one of the most feared evils of the European Middle Ages, plague, often understood as a punishment for the sins of mankind. This was the central panel of the altarpiece of the church of the Mother of God. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC 3945.
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Photo of a Three handles "Palace Style" amphora with three large octopuses within a marines cape of rocks and seaweed. A mycenaean copy of a Minoan Marine Style.   Mycenae tomb 2, Greece. 15th century BC,  cat no: 6725, National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • Photo of a Three handles "Palace Style" amphora with three large octopuses within a marines cape of rocks and seaweed. A mycenaean copy of a Minoan Marine Style.   Mycenae tomb 2, Greece. 15th century BC,  cat no: 6725, National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • Photo of a Three handles "Palace Style" amphora with three large octopuses within a marines cape of rocks and seaweed. A mycenaean copy of a Minoan Marine Style.   Mycenae tomb 2, Greece. 15th century BC,  cat no: 6725, National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • Photo of a Three handles "Palace Style" amphora with three large octopuses within a marines cape of rocks and seaweed. A mycenaean copy of a Minoan Marine Style.   Mycenae tomb 2, Greece. 15th century BC,  cat no: 6725, National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Photo of a Three handles "Palace Style" amphora with three large octopuses within a marines cape of rocks and seaweed. A mycenaean copy of a Minoan Marine Style.   Mycenae tomb 2, Greece. 15th century BC,  cat no: 6725, National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum

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