• Roman marble sculptured relief with cupids about to sacrifice bulls, from the Temple of Venus Genetrix in the Forum of Caesar Rome 30 AD , inv 6718 Farnese Collection, Naples Archaeological Museum
  • Roman marble sculptured relief with cupids about to sacrifice bulls, from the Temple of Venus Genetrix in the Forum of Caesar Rome 30 AD , inv 6718 Farnese Collection, Naples Archaeological Museum
  • Roman marble sculptured relief with cupids about to sacrifice bulls, from the Temple of Venus Genetrix in the Forum of Caesar Rome 30 AD , inv 6718 Farnese Collection, Naples Archaeological Museum
  • Roman marble sculptured relief with cupids about to sacrifice bulls, from the Temple of Venus Genetrix in the Forum of Caesar Rome 30 AD , inv 6718 Farnese Collection, Naples Archaeological Museum
  • Roman marble sculptured relief with cupids about to sacrifice bulls, from the Temple of Venus Genetrix in the Forum of Caesar Rome 30 AD , inv 6718 Farnese Collection, Naples Archaeological Museum
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of Fishing Cupids depicting cupids a cupid swimming with a dolphin, room no 24  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Fishing cupids room was a dining room for guests of the Villa Romana del Casale. The mosaic floor represents a sea scene with four boats from which cupids are busy fishing. The mosaic depicts sea around the boats abounds with marine life. The mosaic show several Roman fishing techniques using nets, fishing lines, harpoon and fish traps.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of Fishing Cupids depicting cupids fishing from boats using a harpoon and a rod and line, room no 24  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Fishing cupids room was a dining room for guests of the Villa Romana del Casale. The mosaic floor represents a sea scene with four boats from which cupids are busy fishing. The mosaic depicts sea around the boats abounds with marine life. The mosaic show several Roman fishing techniques using nets, fishing lines, harpoon and fish traps.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of Fishing Cupids depicting cupids fishing from boats, room no 24  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Fishing cupids room was a dining room for guests of the Villa Romana del Casale. The mosaic floor represents a sea scene with four boats from which cupids are busy fishing. The mosaic depicts sea around the boats abounds with marine life. The mosaic show several Roman fishing techniques using nets, fishing lines, harpoon and fish traps.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of Fishing Cupids depicting cupids fishing from boats using a fishing trap and a rod and line, room no 24  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Fishing cupids room was a dining room for guests of the Villa Romana del Casale. The mosaic floor represents a sea scene with four boats from which cupids are busy fishing. The mosaic depicts sea around the boats abounds with marine life. The mosaic show several Roman fishing techniques using nets, fishing lines, harpoon and fish traps.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of Fishing Cupids depicting cupids fishing from boats, room no 24  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Fishing cupids room was a dining room for guests of the Villa Romana del Casale. The mosaic floor represents a sea scene with four boats from which cupids are busy fishing. The mosaic depicts sea around the boats abounds with marine life. The mosaic show several Roman fishing techniques using nets, fishing lines, harpoon and fish traps.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of Fishing Cupids depicting cupids fishing from boats using a fishing trap and a rod and line, room no 24  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Fishing cupids room was a dining room for guests of the Villa Romana del Casale. The mosaic floor represents a sea scene with four boats from which cupids are busy fishing. The mosaic depicts sea around the boats abounds with marine life. The mosaic show several Roman fishing techniques using nets, fishing lines, harpoon and fish traps.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of Fishing Cupids depicting cupids fishing from boats using a harpoon and a rod and line, room no 24  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Fishing cupids room was a dining room for guests of the Villa Romana del Casale. The mosaic floor represents a sea scene with four boats from which cupids are busy fishing. The mosaic depicts sea around the boats abounds with marine life. The mosaic show several Roman fishing techniques using nets, fishing lines, harpoon and fish traps.
  • Detail of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids showing cupids amongst vines, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Wide picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of Fishing Cupids depicting cupids fishing from boats, room no 24  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Wide picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of Fishing Cupids depicting cupids fishing from boats, room no 24  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Detail of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids showing cupids amongst vines, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Detail of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids showing cupids amongst vines, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Detail of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids showing cupids amongst vines, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Wide picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of Fishing Cupids depicting cupids fishing from boats, room no 24  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Detail of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids showing a cupid and a camel, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Wide picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of Fishing Cupids depicting cupids fishing from boats, room no 24  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Cupid and a dolphin Roman mosaic from the Room of the Fishing Cupids no 24, at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world, circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and fishing cupids, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD, House of Silenus. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against an art background<br />
<br />
The Silenus Roman mosaic depicts multiple scenes : the tying up of Silenus, who is permanently drunk, and is depicted in the middle of the mosaic lying on a bed of leaves. Around him children are trying to tie his hands and legs with garlands of flowers.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and fishing cupids, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD, House of Silenus. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Detail of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids showing a lion, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
The Silenus Roman mosaic depicts multiple scenes : the tying up of Silenus, who is permanently drunk, and is depicted in the middle of the mosaic lying on a bed of leaves. Around him children are trying to tie his hands and legs with garlands of flowers.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a black background<br />
<br />
The Silenus Roman mosaic depicts multiple scenes : the tying up of Silenus, who is permanently drunk, and is depicted in the middle of the mosaic lying on a bed of leaves. Around him children are trying to tie his hands and legs with garlands of flowers.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting cupids picking grapes, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD, House of Dolphins. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and fishing cupids, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD, House of Silenus. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and fishing cupids, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD, House of Silenus. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a black background
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and fishing cupids, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD, House of Silenus. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against an art background
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and fishing cupids, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD, House of Silenus. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a grey background
  • Detail of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids showing a baby elephant, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a white background<br />
<br />
The Silenus Roman mosaic depicts multiple scenes : the tying up of Silenus, who is permanently drunk, and is depicted in the middle of the mosaic lying on a bed of leaves. Around him children are trying to tie his hands and legs with garlands of flowers.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
The Silenus Roman mosaic depicts multiple scenes : the tying up of Silenus, who is permanently drunk, and is depicted in the middle of the mosaic lying on a bed of leaves. Around him children are trying to tie his hands and legs with garlands of flowers.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
The Silenus Roman mosaic depicts multiple scenes : the tying up of Silenus, who is permanently drunk, and is depicted in the middle of the mosaic lying on a bed of leaves. Around him children are trying to tie his hands and legs with garlands of flowers.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
The Silenus Roman mosaic depicts multiple scenes : the tying up of Silenus, who is permanently drunk, and is depicted in the middle of the mosaic lying on a bed of leaves. Around him children are trying to tie his hands and legs with garlands of flowers.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting cupids picking grapes, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD, House of Dolphins. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting cupids picking grapes and panthers, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD, House of Dolphins. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and fishing cupids, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD, House of Silenus. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a white background
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
The Silenus Roman mosaic depicts multiple scenes : the tying up of Silenus, who is permanently drunk, and is depicted in the middle of the mosaic lying on a bed of leaves. Around him children are trying to tie his hands and legs with garlands of flowers.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and fishing cupids, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD, House of Silenus. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and fishing cupids, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD, House of Silenus. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Detail of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids showing a baby elephant, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a grey background<br />
<br />
The Silenus Roman mosaic depicts multiple scenes : the tying up of Silenus, who is permanently drunk, and is depicted in the middle of the mosaic lying on a bed of leaves. Around him children are trying to tie his hands and legs with garlands of flowers.
  • Detail of a Roman Mosaic from the Room of The Fishing Cupids, room 24, at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Detail of cupids fishing from a boat, a Roman Mosaic from the Room of The Fishing Cupids, room 24, at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Detail of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids showing Pan and a goat and a cupid in the vines, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Detail of a Roman Mosaic from the Room of The Fishing Cupids, room 24, at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Detail of a Roman Mosaic from the Room of The Fishing Cupids, room 24, at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Round Roman mosaic of a Lion and Cupids between Dionysus and Manadi, Pompeii, House of the Centaur (VI 9.3,) inv No 10019,  Naples Archaeological Musuem, Italy
  • Detail of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids showing Pan and a goat, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Detail of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids showing 2 figures, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Detail of a Roman Mosaic from the Room of The Fishing Cupids, room 24, at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Detail of a Roman Mosaic from the Room of The Fishing Cupids, room 24, at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Cupids & dolphin Roman mosaic, room 24, at the Villa Romana del Casale, Sicily ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Round Roman mosaic of a Lion and Cupids between Dionysus and Manadi, Pompeii, House of the Centaur (VI 9.3,) inv No 10019,  Naples Archaeological Musuem, Italy
  • Detail of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids showing Pan and a goat, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Cupids & dolphin Roman mosaic, room 24, at the Villa Romana del Casale, Sicily ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Detail of the Roman fresco wall painting of a Dionysus accompanied by Silenius and two cupids finds Ariadne in a deep sleep, he takes her to Olympus and marries her so giving her immortality ,Pompeii House of the Tragic Poet, inv 9271, Naples National Archaeological Museum,
  • Round Roman mosaic of a Lion and Cupids between Dionysus and Manadi, Pompeii, House of the Centaur (VI 9.3,) inv No 10019,  Naples Archaeological Musuem, Italy
  • Round Roman mosaic of a Lion and Cupids between Dionysus and Manadi, Pompeii, House of the Centaur (VI 9.3,) inv No 10019,  Naples Archaeological Musuem, Italy
  • Cupid in a boat from the Room of the Fishing Cupids no 24, - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed  in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Pictures of an apse Roman mosaics design depicting a peacock spreading its tail feathers between two winged angels or cupids holding long candle sticks, from the Maison du Paon in the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Pictures of an apse Roman mosaics design depicting a peacock spreading its tail feathers between two winged angels or cupids holding long candle sticks, from the Maison du Paon in the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Semi Circular Room, depicting cupids fishing from boats, at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Wide picture of the Roman mosaics of the Semi Circular Room, depicting cupids fishing from boats, at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Pictures of an apse Roman mosaics design depicting a peacock spreading its tail feathers between two winged angels or cupids holding long candle sticks, from the Maison du Paon in the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Semi Circular Room, depicting cupids fishing from boats, at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Semi Circular Room, depicting cupids fishing from boats, at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Close up detail of the Roman mosaics of the Semi Circular Room, depicting cupids fishing from boats, at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Wide picture of the Roman mosaics of the Semi Circular Room, depicting cupids fishing from boats, at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Wide picture of the Roman mosaics of the Semi Circular Room, depicting cupids fishing from boats, at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Wide picture of the Roman mosaics of the Semi Circular Room, depicting cupids fishing from boats, at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Semi Circular Room, depicting cupids fishing from boats, at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Semi Circular Room, depicting cupids fishing from boats, at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Round Roman mosaic of a Lion and Cupids between Dionysus and Manadi, Pompeii, House of the Centaur (VI 9.3,) inv No 10019,  Naples Archaeological Musuem, Italy
  • Pictures of an apse Roman mosaics design depicting a peacock spreading its tail feathers between two winged angels or cupids holding long candle sticks, from the Maison du Paon in the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Pictures of an apse Roman mosaics design depicting a peacock spreading its tail feathers between two winged angels or cupids holding long candle sticks, from the Maison du Paon in the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Semi Circular Room, depicting cupids fishing from boats, at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Semi Circular Room, depicting cupids fishing from boats, at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roman panel with candelabra and a cupid hunter in glass paste from  Pompeii VI, Inv 38 No 10012, Naples Archaeological Musuem, Italy
  • Roman panel with candelabra and a cupid hunter in glass paste from  Pompeii VI, Inv 38 No 10012, Naples Archaeological Musuem, Italy
  • Roman panel with candelabra and a cupid hunter in glass paste from  Pompeii VI, Inv 38 No 10012, Naples Archaeological Musuem, Italy
  • Roman panel with candelabra and a cupid hunter in glass paste from  Pompeii VI, Inv 38 No 10012, Naples Archaeological Musuem, Italy
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting the cupid owner of a cockerell at a cock fight, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 2nd half of the 2nd century AD, House of Tertulla. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Painted colour verion of  Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Painted colour verion of  Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Roman fresco wall painting of Dionysus who, with the aid of a cupid, discovers Ariadne in a deep sleep at the foot of Hypnos, Pompeii VI 14,30, inv 111210, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting the cupid owner of a cockerell at a cock fight, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 2nd half of the 2nd century AD, House of Tertulla. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Painted colour verion of  Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Painted colour verion of  Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Painted colour verion of  Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Roman panel with candelabra and a cupid hunter in glass paste from  Pompeii VI, Inv 38 No 10012, Naples Archaeological Musuem, Italy
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a grey background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a grey background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .    Against a grey background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a white background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   Against an art background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a grey background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against an art background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a white background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a black background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a white background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a black background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Detail of a cupid and a dolphin. Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed  in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Cupid swimming with a dolphin. Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed  in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Vaulted of the First Antichamber of Joachim Murat with its fresco by Franz Hill of Telemachus being healed by Minerva  from the darts of Cupid. The Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   Against a white background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .    Against a black background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a black background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against an art background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a grey background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a white background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a black background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting  panthers, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD, House of Dolphins. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting  panthers, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD, House of Dolphins. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.

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