• The Neo Classical chapel of the Achilleion  [ Achilles, ???????? ]  Palace [ 1890 built by Elizabeth [ Sissi ] Emperess of Austria
  • The Neo Classical Pompeian style Achilleion  [ Achilles, ???????? ]  Palace [ 1890 built by Elizabeth [ Sissi ] Emperess of Austria
  • Romantic style painting above the stairway at the Achilleion  [ Achilles, ???????? ]  Palace [ 1890 built by Elizabeth [ Sissi ] Emperess of Austria
  • Stairway with painting of Acullies at the Achilleion  [ Achilles, ???????? ]  Palace [ 1890 built by Elizabeth [ Sissi ] Emperess of Austria
  • Stairway of the Achilleion  [ Achilles, ???????? ]  Palace [ 1890 built by Elizabeth [ Sissi ] Emperess of Austria
  • The Neo Classical chapel of the Achilleion  [ Achilles, ???????? ]  Palace [ 1890 built by Elizabeth [ Sissi ] Emperess of Austria
  • The Neo Classical Pompeian style Achilleion  [ Achilles, ???????? ]  Palace [ 1890 built by Elizabeth [ Sissi ] Emperess of Austria
  • The Neo Classical Pompeian style Achilleion  [ Achilles, ???????? ]  Palace [ 1890 built by Elizabeth [ Sissi ] Emperess of Austria
  • The Neo Classical Pompeian style Achilleion  [ Achilles, ???????? ]  Palace [ 1890 built by Elizabeth [ Sissi ] Emperess of Austria
  • Stairway with painting of Acullies at the Achilleion  [ Achilles, ???????? ]  Palace [ 1890 built by Elizabeth [ Sissi ] Emperess of Austria
  • Stairway of the Achilleion  [ Achilles, ???????? ]  Palace [ 1890 built by Elizabeth [ Sissi ] Emperess of Austria
  • Mosaic depicting Empress Theodora and attendants. Byzantine Roman mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna, Italy. Mosaic decoration paid for by Emperor Justinian I in 547. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Mosaic depicting Empress Theodora and attendants. Byzantine Roman mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna, Italy. Mosaic decoration paid for by Emperor Justinian I in 547. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Mosaic depicting Empress Theodora and attendants. Byzantine Roman mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna, Italy. Mosaic decoration paid for by Emperor Justinian I in 547. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Roman statue of Julia Domina . Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 3268. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Julia Domna (AD 160–217) was a Roman empress , the second wife of Septimius Severus (reigned 193–211).
  • Roman statue of Julia Domina . Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 3268. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Julia Domna (AD 160–217) was a Roman empress , the second wife of Septimius Severus (reigned 193–211).
  • Roman statue of Julia Domina . Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 3268. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Julia Domna (AD 160–217) was a Roman empress , the second wife of Septimius Severus (reigned 193–211).
  • Roman statue of Julia Domina . Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 3268. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Julia Domna (AD 160–217) was a Roman empress , the second wife of Septimius Severus (reigned 193–211).
  • Roman statue of Julia Domina . Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 3268. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Julia Domna (AD 160–217) was a Roman empress , the second wife of Septimius Severus (reigned 193–211).  Against a grey background
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Excavations of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Excavations of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • Excavations of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic pillar base of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • Christ being baptised by John The Baptist in Byzantine mosaics of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Christ being baptised by John The Baptist in Byzantine mosaics of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Christ being baptised by John The Baptist in Byzantine mosaics of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Interior of a chapel and Orthodox icons of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The crusifiction Byzantine mosaic of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Byzantine mosaics of Christ i Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Interior of a chapel and Orthodox icons of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Interior of a chapel and Orthodox icons of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Interior of a chapel and Orthodox icons of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Ruins of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Ossary of Victims  of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance.  The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Ruins of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Ruins of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Ruins of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Excavations of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • Ionic pillar base of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • 11th Century Byzantine mosaic of Christ Pantocrator with (left) Emperor Constantine IX Monmachus making an offering of money and (right) Empress Zoe. Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Byzantine mosaics of of angels in Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Interior of a chapel and Orthodox icons of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine chapel & Ossary of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 12th Century Byzantine mosaic of  Empress Irene  (Eirene) making an offering as symbolised by the scroll. Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey

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Picture The Past

ABOUT

FunkyStock Picture Library free resource for professional editorial picture editors, picture researchers, historical scholars and students and enthusiasts who want to browse some of the best pictures and images of historic countries, historical places, archaeological sites and the very best museum antiquities and artefacts exhibits in Europe and the Middle East.

Pictures and Images can be downloaded or bought as stock photos or photo art prints.

COUNTRIES

Browse travel pictures and images of historic places and archaeological sites of countries in Europe and the Middle East.

VIEW COUNTRIES INDEX....

HISTORICAL

Explore the past through pictures and images of its historic places. See the great palaces, castles and cities of antiquity as well as the great archaeological sites where our ancestors made history.

EXPLORE HISTORICAL PLACES...

MUSEUMS

Browse pictures & images the treasured artefacts and antiquities exhibits from the great Museum of Europe and the Middle East. See the art and objects made by our ancestors.

SEE MUESEUM ANTIQUITIES....