• 2nd century AD Roman marble sculptured of Dionysus and Eros, inv 6307, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculptured of Dionysus and Eros, inv 6307, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculptured of Dionysus and Eros, inv 6307, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman sculpture of Eros with a dolphin, inv no 6357, The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman sculpture of Eros with a dolphin, inv no 6357, The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman sculpture of Eros with a dolphin, inv no 6357, The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculptured of Dionysus and Eros, inv 6307, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculptured of Dionysus and Eros, inv 6307, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman sculpture of Eros with a dolphin, inv no 6357, The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman sculpture of Eros with a dolphin, inv no 6357, The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Close up detail of the Roman mosaics of the Vestibule of Eros & Pan, room no 43  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Vestibule of Eros and Pan Roman floor mosaic at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene that is intended to show how difficult it is for someone like Pan , who is ugly but has a good heart, to conquer love, represented by Eros. Between the two divinities are a palm leaf and a coin symbolising the prizes to be awarded to the winner of the contest.
  • Close up detail of the Roman mosaics of the Vestibule of Eros & Pan depicting Pan, room no 43  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Vestibule of Eros and Pan Roman floor mosaic at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene that is intended to show how difficult it is for someone like Pan , who is ugly but has a good heart, to conquer love, represented by Eros. Between the two divinities are a palm leaf and a coin symbolising the prizes to be awarded to the winner of the contest.
  • Close up detail of the Roman mosaics of the Vestibule of Eros & Pan, room no 43  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Vestibule of Eros and Pan Roman floor mosaic at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene that is intended to show how difficult it is for someone like Pan , who is ugly but has a good heart, to conquer love, represented by Eros. Between the two divinities are a palm leaf and a coin symbolising the prizes to be awarded to the winner of the contest.
  • Wide picture of the Roman mosaics of the Vestibule of Eros & Pan, room no 43  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Vestibule of Eros and Pan Roman floor mosaic at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene that is intended to show how difficult it is for someone like Pan , who is ugly but has a good heart, to conquer love, represented by Eros. Between the two divinities are a palm leaf and a coin symbolising the prizes to be awarded to the winner of the contest.
  • Statue of Eros known as The Genie of Borghese - a  Roman copy of a 4th century BC Greek original from Rome, Monte Cavallo. The statue belonged to Domenico Biondo, employee of Pope Paul V Borghese. The statue joined in 1608 in the collection of Scipio Borghese. Wings, arms and legs of Eros, formerly called Genie Borghese, are modern. In the 18th century it was much admired, especially in France, as one of the seven most important parts of the collection Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Eros known as The Genie of Borghese - a  Roman copy of a 4th century BC Greek original from Rome, Monte Cavallo. The statue belonged to Domenico Biondo, employee of Pope Paul V Borghese. The statue joined in 1608 in the collection of Scipio Borghese. Wings, arms and legs of Eros, formerly called Genie Borghese, are modern. In the 18th century it was much admired, especially in France, as one of the seven most important parts of the collection Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Eros known as The Genie of Borghese - a  Roman copy of a 4th century BC Greek original from Rome, Monte Cavallo. The statue belonged to Domenico Biondo, employee of Pope Paul V Borghese. The statue joined in 1608 in the collection of Scipio Borghese. Wings, arms and legs of Eros, formerly called Genie Borghese, are modern. In the 18th century it was much admired, especially in France, as one of the seven most important parts of the collection Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Eros known as The Genie of Borghese - a  Roman copy of a 4th century BC Greek original from Rome, Monte Cavallo. The statue belonged to Domenico Biondo, employee of Pope Paul V Borghese. The statue joined in 1608 in the collection of Scipio Borghese. Wings, arms and legs of Eros, formerly called Genie Borghese, are modern. In the 18th century it was much admired, especially in France, as one of the seven most important parts of the collection Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Eros known as The Genie of Borghese - a  Roman copy of a 4th century BC Greek original from Rome, Monte Cavallo. The statue belonged to Domenico Biondo, employee of Pope Paul V Borghese. The statue joined in 1608 in the collection of Scipio Borghese. Wings, arms and legs of Eros, formerly called Genie Borghese, are modern. In the 18th century it was much admired, especially in France, as one of the seven most important parts of the collection Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Eros known as The Genie of Borghese - a  Roman copy of a 4th century BC Greek original from Rome, Monte Cavallo. The statue belonged to Domenico Biondo, employee of Pope Paul V Borghese. The statue joined in 1608 in the collection of Scipio Borghese. Wings, arms and legs of Eros, formerly called Genie Borghese, are modern. In the 18th century it was much admired, especially in France, as one of the seven most important parts of the collection Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Eros known as The Genie of Borghese - a  Roman copy of a 4th century BC Greek original from Rome, Monte Cavallo. The statue belonged to Domenico Biondo, employee of Pope Paul V Borghese. The statue joined in 1608 in the collection of Scipio Borghese. Wings, arms and legs of Eros, formerly called Genie Borghese, are modern. In the 18th century it was much admired, especially in France, as one of the seven most important parts of the collection Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Eros known as The Genie of Borghese - a  Roman copy of a 4th century BC Greek original from Rome, Monte Cavallo. The statue belonged to Domenico Biondo, employee of Pope Paul V Borghese. The statue joined in 1608 in the collection of Scipio Borghese. Wings, arms and legs of Eros, formerly called Genie Borghese, are modern. In the 18th century it was much admired, especially in France, as one of the seven most important parts of the collection Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculptured of Dionysus and Eros, inv 6307, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculptured of Dionysus and Eros, inv 6307, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculptured of Dionysus and Eros, inv 6307, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculptured of Dionysus and Eros, inv 6307, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculptured of Dionysus and Eros, inv 6307, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Statue of Eros known as The Genie of Borghese - a  Roman copy of a 4th century BC Greek original from Rome, Monte Cavallo. The statue belonged to Domenico Biondo, employee of Pope Paul V Borghese. The statue joined in 1608 in the collection of Scipio Borghese. Wings, arms and legs of Eros, formerly called Genie Borghese, are modern. In the 18th century it was much admired, especially in France, as one of the seven most important parts of the collection Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Eros known as The Genie of Borghese - a  Roman copy of a 4th century BC Greek original from Rome, Monte Cavallo. The statue belonged to Domenico Biondo, employee of Pope Paul V Borghese. The statue joined in 1608 in the collection of Scipio Borghese. Wings, arms and legs of Eros, formerly called Genie Borghese, are modern. In the 18th century it was much admired, especially in France, as one of the seven most important parts of the collection Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted colour verion of  Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Painted colour verion of  Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Painted colour verion of  Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Painted colour verion of  Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Painted colour verion of  Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Roman Mosaic - close up of Eros riding a dolphin. The Oceanos & Tethys Mosaic, fom The House of Oceanos, Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The Oceanos and Tethys Mosaic is the floor mosaic of the shallow pool of the House of Oceanos. In this mosaic, which belongs to the Early Roman Empire Period, Oceanos, the river god who is the origin of life, and his wife Tethys are represented. At the middle of the mosaic which is surrounded by a geometric triple tress borders there are Oceanos and his wife Tethys. Around them there are Eros figures riding various species of fish and dolphins symbolising the abundance of the sea. The most represented attributes of Oceanos are snake and fish.
  • Venus and Eros Roman Sculpture of the 2nd century AD, National Museum of Archaeology of Tarragona, inv no MNAT 436
  • Roman Mosaic - The Oceanos & Tethys Mosaic, fom The House of Oceanos, Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Oceanos and Tethys Mosaic is the floor mosaic of the shallow pool of the House of Oceanos. In this mosaic, which belongs to the Early Roman Empire Period, Oceanos, the river god who is the origin of life, and his wife Tethys are represented. At the middle of the mosaic which is surrounded by a geometric triple tress borders there are Oceanos and his wife Tethys. Around them there are Eros figures riding various species of fish and dolphins symbolising the abundance of the sea. The most represented attributes of Oceanos are snake and fish.<br />
<br />
 in the mosaic, Oceanos is seen with chelas. Those chelas are among his most characteristic attributes. Though the tail of an eel is represented as his feet in the figures on ceramics, within the scope of the art of mosaic he is represented as a bust and only with the chelas on his head such as this one. His wife Tethys is right by his side and represented with wings upon her forehead. Between them, there is the dragon called Cetos which is a mythological sea creature. As is seen in the coins of Zeugma, the Euphrates River is expressed as a dragon. Besides these two figures, on the top-right of the mosaic, there is a young male figure which is thought to be Pan, the patron of fishermen and shepherds. The fact that Eros figures and Pan which are the side figures are located outward implies that the pool is built to allow walking around. <br />
<br />
The expression of the Oceanos as not an ocean but a river surrounding the world: By that the water, which vapours with the heat of the sun and then gives life to the nature by becoming rain, and which after being used by the nature reaches again the sea via the rivers is expressed. The water becomes aware of itself and its function by that cycle. This phenomenon is represented in the mosaic panel as the diversification of O
  • Roman Mosaic - close up river god Oceanos The Oceanos & Tethys Mosaic, fom The House of Oceanos, Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The Oceanos and Tethys Mosaic is the floor mosaic of the shallow pool of the House of Oceanos. In this mosaic, which belongs to the Early Roman Empire Period, Oceanos, the river god who is the origin of life, and his wife Tethys are represented. At the middle of the mosaic which is surrounded by a geometric triple tress borders there are Oceanos and his wife Tethys. Around them there are Eros figures riding various species of fish and dolphins symbolising the abundance of the sea. The most represented attributes of Oceanos are snake and fish.<br />
<br />
 in the mosaic, Oceanos is seen with chelas. Those chelas are among his most characteristic attributes. Though the tail of an eel is represented as his feet in the figures on ceramics, within the scope of the art of mosaic he is represented as a bust and only with the chelas on his head such as this one. His wife Tethys is right by his side and represented with wings upon her forehead. Between them, there is the dragon called Cetos which is a mythological sea creature. As is seen in the coins of Zeugma, the Euphrates River is expressed as a dragon. Besides these two figures, on the top-right of the mosaic, there is a young male figure which is thought to be Pan, the patron of fishermen and shepherds. The fact that Eros figures and Pan which are the side figures are located outward implies that the pool is built to allow walking around. <br />
<br />
The expression of the Oceanos as not an ocean but a river surrounding the world: By that the water, which vapours with the heat of the sun and then gives life to the nature by becoming rain, and which after being used by the nature reaches again the sea via the rivers is expressed. The water becomes aware of itself and its function by that cycle. This phenomenon is represented in the mosaic panel as the diversification of Ocen
  • Roman Mosaic - close up of  Tethys wife of river god Oceanos. The Oceanos & Tethys Mosaic, fom The House of Oceanos, Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The Oceanos and Tethys Mosaic is the floor mosaic of the shallow pool of the House of Oceanos. In this mosaic, which belongs to the Early Roman Empire Period, Oceanos, the river god who is the origin of life, and his wife Tethys are represented. At the middle of the mosaic which is surrounded by a geometric triple tress borders there are Oceanos and his wife Tethys. Around them there are Eros figures riding various species of fish and dolphins symbolising the abundance of the sea. The most represented attributes of Oceanos are snake and fish.<br />
<br />
 in the mosaic, Oceanos is seen with chelas. Those chelas are among his most characteristic attributes. Though the tail of an eel is represented as his feet in the figures on ceramics, within the scope of the art of mosaic he is represented as a bust and only with the chelas on his head such as this one. His wife Tethys is right by his side and represented with wings upon her forehead. Between them, there is the dragon called Cetos which is a mythological sea creature. As is seen in the coins of Zeugma, the Euphrates River is expressed as a dragon. Besides these two figures, on the top-right of the mosaic, there is a young male figure which is thought to be Pan, the patron of fishermen and shepherds. The fact that Eros figures and Pan which are the side figures are located outward implies that the pool is built to allow walking around. <br />
<br />
The expression of the Oceanos as not an ocean but a river surrounding the world: By that the water, which vapours with the heat of the sun and then gives life to the nature by becoming rain, and which after being used by the nature reaches again the sea via the rivers is expressed. The water becomes aware of itself and its function by that cycle. This phenomenon is represented in the mosaic panel as the div
  • Roman Mosaic - close up of  Oceanos and his wife Tethys. The Oceanos & Tethys Mosaic, fom The House of Oceanos, Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The Oceanos and Tethys Mosaic is the floor mosaic of the shallow pool of the House of Oceanos. In this mosaic, which belongs to the Early Roman Empire Period, Oceanos, the river god who is the origin of life, and his wife Tethys are represented. At the middle of the mosaic which is surrounded by a geometric triple tress borders there are Oceanos and his wife Tethys. Around them there are Eros figures riding various species of fish and dolphins symbolising the abundance of the sea. The most represented attributes of Oceanos are snake and fish.<br />
<br />
 in the mosaic, Oceanos is seen with chelas. Those chelas are among his most characteristic attributes. Though the tail of an eel is represented as his feet in the figures on ceramics, within the scope of the art of mosaic he is represented as a bust and only with the chelas on his head such as this one. His wife Tethys is right by his side and represented with wings upon her forehead. Between them, there is the dragon called Cetos which is a mythological sea creature. As is seen in the coins of Zeugma, the Euphrates River is expressed as a dragon. Besides these two figures, on the top-right of the mosaic, there is a young male figure which is thought to be Pan, the patron of fishermen and shepherds. The fact that Eros figures and Pan which are the side figures are located outward implies that the pool is built to allow walking around. <br />
<br />
The expression of the Oceanos as not an ocean but a river surrounding the world: By that the water, which vapours with the heat of the sun and then gives life to the nature by becoming rain, and which after being used by the nature reaches again the sea via the rivers is expressed. The water becomes aware of itself and its function by that cycle. This phenomenon is represented in the mosaic panel as the diversif
  • Roman Mosaic - The Oceanos & Tethys Mosaic, fom The House of Oceanos, Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The Oceanos and Tethys Mosaic is the floor mosaic of the shallow pool of the House of Oceanos. In this mosaic, which belongs to the Early Roman Empire Period, Oceanos, the river god who is the origin of life, and his wife Tethys are represented. At the middle of the mosaic which is surrounded by a geometric triple tress borders there are Oceanos and his wife Tethys. Around them there are Eros figures riding various species of fish and dolphins symbolising the abundance of the sea. The most represented attributes of Oceanos are snake and fish.<br />
<br />
 in the mosaic, Oceanos is seen with chelas. Those chelas are among his most characteristic attributes. Though the tail of an eel is represented as his feet in the figures on ceramics, within the scope of the art of mosaic he is represented as a bust and only with the chelas on his head such as this one. His wife Tethys is right by his side and represented with wings upon her forehead. Between them, there is the dragon called Cetos which is a mythological sea creature. As is seen in the coins of Zeugma, the Euphrates River is expressed as a dragon. Besides these two figures, on the top-right of the mosaic, there is a young male figure which is thought to be Pan, the patron of fishermen and shepherds. The fact that Eros figures and Pan which are the side figures are located outward implies that the pool is built to allow walking around. <br />
<br />
The expression of the Oceanos as not an ocean but a river surrounding the world: By that the water, which vapours with the heat of the sun and then gives life to the nature by becoming rain, and which after being used by the nature reaches again the sea via the rivers is expressed. The water becomes aware of itself and its function by that cycle. This phenomenon is represented in the mosaic panel as the diversification of Ocenaos through unification wit
  • Roman Mosaic - The Oceanos & Tethys Mosaic, fom The House of Oceanos, Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Oceanos and Tethys Mosaic is the floor mosaic of the shallow pool of the House of Oceanos. In this mosaic, which belongs to the Early Roman Empire Period, Oceanos, the river god who is the origin of life, and his wife Tethys are represented. At the middle of the mosaic which is surrounded by a geometric triple tress borders there are Oceanos and his wife Tethys. Around them there are Eros figures riding various species of fish and dolphins symbolising the abundance of the sea. The most represented attributes of Oceanos are snake and fish.<br />
<br />
 in the mosaic, Oceanos is seen with chelas. Those chelas are among his most characteristic attributes. Though the tail of an eel is represented as his feet in the figures on ceramics, within the scope of the art of mosaic he is represented as a bust and only with the chelas on his head such as this one. His wife Tethys is right by his side and represented with wings upon her forehead. Between them, there is the dragon called Cetos which is a mythological sea creature. As is seen in the coins of Zeugma, the Euphrates River is expressed as a dragon. Besides these two figures, on the top-right of the mosaic, there is a young male figure which is thought to be Pan, the patron of fishermen and shepherds. The fact that Eros figures and Pan which are the side figures are located outward implies that the pool is built to allow walking around. <br />
<br />
The expression of the Oceanos as not an ocean but a river surrounding the world: By that the water, which vapours with the heat of the sun and then gives life to the nature by becoming rain, and which after being used by the nature reaches again the sea via the rivers is expressed. The water becomes aware of itself and its function by that cycle. This phenomenon is represented in the mosaic panel as the diversification of O
  • Roman Mosaic - The Oceanos & Tethys Mosaic, fom The House of Oceanos, Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Oceanos and Tethys Mosaic is the floor mosaic of the shallow pool of the House of Oceanos. In this mosaic, which belongs to the Early Roman Empire Period, Oceanos, the river god who is the origin of life, and his wife Tethys are represented. At the middle of the mosaic which is surrounded by a geometric triple tress borders there are Oceanos and his wife Tethys. Around them there are Eros figures riding various species of fish and dolphins symbolising the abundance of the sea. The most represented attributes of Oceanos are snake and fish.<br />
<br />
 in the mosaic, Oceanos is seen with chelas. Those chelas are among his most characteristic attributes. Though the tail of an eel is represented as his feet in the figures on ceramics, within the scope of the art of mosaic he is represented as a bust and only with the chelas on his head such as this one. His wife Tethys is right by his side and represented with wings upon her forehead. Between them, there is the dragon called Cetos which is a mythological sea creature. As is seen in the coins of Zeugma, the Euphrates River is expressed as a dragon. Besides these two figures, on the top-right of the mosaic, there is a young male figure which is thought to be Pan, the patron of fishermen and shepherds. The fact that Eros figures and Pan which are the side figures are located outward implies that the pool is built to allow walking around. <br />
<br />
The expression of the Oceanos as not an ocean but a river surrounding the world: By that the water, which vapours with the heat of the sun and then gives life to the nature by becoming rain, and which after being used by the nature reaches again the sea via the rivers is expressed. The water becomes aware of itself and its function by that cycle. This phenomenon is represented in the mosaic panel as the diversification of Oc
  • Roman Mosaic - The Oceanos & Tethys Mosaic, fom The House of Oceanos, Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Oceanos and Tethys Mosaic is the floor mosaic of the shallow pool of the House of Oceanos. In this mosaic, which belongs to the Early Roman Empire Period, Oceanos, the river god who is the origin of life, and his wife Tethys are represented. At the middle of the mosaic which is surrounded by a geometric triple tress borders there are Oceanos and his wife Tethys. Around them there are Eros figures riding various species of fish and dolphins symbolising the abundance of the sea. The most represented attributes of Oceanos are snake and fish.<br />
<br />
 in the mosaic, Oceanos is seen with chelas. Those chelas are among his most characteristic attributes. Though the tail of an eel is represented as his feet in the figures on ceramics, within the scope of the art of mosaic he is represented as a bust and only with the chelas on his head such as this one. His wife Tethys is right by his side and represented with wings upon her forehead. Between them, there is the dragon called Cetos which is a mythological sea creature. As is seen in the coins of Zeugma, the Euphrates River is expressed as a dragon. Besides these two figures, on the top-right of the mosaic, there is a young male figure which is thought to be Pan, the patron of fishermen and shepherds. The fact that Eros figures and Pan which are the side figures are located outward implies that the pool is built to allow walking around. <br />
<br />
The expression of the Oceanos as not an ocean but a river surrounding the world: By that the water, which vapours with the heat of the sun and then gives life to the nature by becoming rain, and which after being used by the nature reaches again the sea via the rivers is expressed. The water becomes aware of itself and its function by that cycle. This phenomenon is represented in the mosaic panel as the diversification of Ocen
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculptured of Dionysus and Eros, inv 6307, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculptured of Dionysus and Eros, inv 6307, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculptured of Dionysus and Eros, inv 6307, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculptured of Dionysus and Eros, inv 6307, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculptured of Dionysus and Eros, inv 6307, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of Eros, a circus chariot rider of the Red Fraction. From Dougga, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Venus and Eros Roman Sculpture of the 2nd century AD, National Museum of Archaeology of Tarragona, inv no MNAT 436
  • Venus and Eros Roman Sculpture of the 2nd century AD, National Museum of Archaeology of Tarragona, inv no MNAT 436
  • Venus and Eros Roman Sculpture of the 2nd century AD, National Museum of Archaeology of Tarragona, inv no MNAT 436
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The dead man is depicted listenening to the flute of Eros which causes him to be distracted from the real world so being able to enter the next The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety .Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The dead man is depicted listenening to the flute of Eros which causes him to be distracted from the real world so being able to enter the next The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety .Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman mosaics - Seasons  Mosaic. Telete Villa.  2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Seasons mosaic Telete, was unearthed during the rescue excavations y Gaziantep Museum in 1994 when it was about to be stolen by the traffickers. It is the floor mosaic of a villa terrace located on the western skins of Zeugma hill <br />
<br />
The pane% consists of nine parts. At the central panel, Eros, who Is a mythological character and who has a crown on his head, sits side by side with Telete, the daughter of Dionysus. This representation symbolises the preparation of a young woman who is just about to taste the love and to become mature. There are busts of seasonal gods In the square panels at the corners. The crowned head of the Spring Goddess Ear Is slightly towards right. She wears a floral necklace. Her righr shoulder is naked and the crimps of her cloak are seen on her left shoulder. There is the bust of the river god on the top-right of the Telete panel. A kid lying on the grass and a bucket are pictured in the lower rectangular panel. In the western-side rectangular panel, on the other hand, there are four fish going in and out of a game basket. There is a rabbit figure within the rectangular panel on the right. Mythical narrations and natural life are intertwined in this mosaic.
  • Roman mosaics - Seasons  Mosaic. Telete Villa.  2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Seasons mosaic Telete, was unearthed during the rescue excavations y Gaziantep Museum in 1994 when it was about to be stolen by the traffickers. It is the floor mosaic of a villa terrace located on the western skins of Zeugma hill <br />
<br />
The pane% consists of nine parts. At the central panel, Eros, who Is a mythological character and who has a crown on his head, sits side by side with Telete, the daughter of Dionysus. This representation symbolises the preparation of a young woman who is just about to taste the love and to become mature. There are busts of seasonal gods In the square panels at the corners. The crowned head of the Spring Goddess Ear Is slightly towards right. She wears a floral necklace. Her righr shoulder is naked and the crimps of her cloak are seen on her left shoulder. There is the bust of the river god on the top-right of the Telete panel. A kid lying on the grass and a bucket are pictured in the lower rectangular panel. In the western-side rectangular panel, on the other hand, there are four fish going in and out of a game basket. There is a rabbit figure within the rectangular panel on the right. Mythical narrations and natural life are intertwined in this mosaic.
  • Roman mosaics - Seasons  Mosaic. Telete Villa.  2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Seasons mosaic Telete, was unearthed during the rescue excavations y Gaziantep Museum in 1994 when it was about to be stolen by the traffickers. It is the floor mosaic of a villa terrace located on the western skins of Zeugma hill <br />
<br />
The pane% consists of nine parts. At the central panel, Eros, who Is a mythological character and who has a crown on his head, sits side by side with Telete, the daughter of Dionysus. This representation symbolises the preparation of a young woman who is just about to taste the love and to become mature. There are busts of seasonal gods In the square panels at the corners. The crowned head of the Spring Goddess Ear Is slightly towards right. She wears a floral necklace. Her righr shoulder is naked and the crimps of her cloak are seen on her left shoulder. There is the bust of the river god on the top-right of the Telete panel. A kid lying on the grass and a bucket are pictured in the lower rectangular panel. In the western-side rectangular panel, on the other hand, there are four fish going in and out of a game basket. There is a rabbit figure within the rectangular panel on the right. Mythical narrations and natural life are intertwined in this mosaic.
  • Roman mosaics - Seasons  Mosaic. Telete Villa.  2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Seasons mosaic Telete, was unearthed during the rescue excavations y Gaziantep Museum in 1994 when it was about to be stolen by the traffickers. It is the floor mosaic of a villa terrace located on the western skins of Zeugma hill <br />
<br />
The pane% consists of nine parts. At the central panel, Eros, who Is a mythological character and who has a crown on his head, sits side by side with Telete, the daughter of Dionysus. This representation symbolises the preparation of a young woman who is just about to taste the love and to become mature. There are busts of seasonal gods In the square panels at the corners. The crowned head of the Spring Goddess Ear Is slightly towards right. She wears a floral necklace. Her righr shoulder is naked and the crimps of her cloak are seen on her left shoulder. There is the bust of the river god on the top-right of the Telete panel. A kid lying on the grass and a bucket are pictured in the lower rectangular panel. In the western-side rectangular panel, on the other hand, there are four fish going in and out of a game basket. There is a rabbit figure within the rectangular panel on the right. Mythical narrations and natural life are intertwined in this mosaic.
  • Roman sarcophagus with garland reliefs sculptures, 3rd century AD made in Laodicea on the Lycus from Hierapolis Necropolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Sarcophagus With Garland.<br />
<br />
They were widely used in the valley of Menderes from the beginning of the 2nd century A.D. The Nike on the edges and the Eros in the middle of the long sides carry the garlands. There are Medusa masks on the upper spaces of the garlands, sometimes the portraits of the owners of the tombs and some mythological descriptions take place here. Medusa masks symbolise the protection of the tomb where as the garlands symbolise the meeting of the owner in the other world. Ostoteks are also made in the some manner. . Against an white background
  • Roman sarcophagus with garland reliefs sculptures, 3rd century AD made in Laodicea on the Lycus from Hierapolis Necropolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Sarcophagus With Garland.<br />
<br />
They were widely used in the valley of Menderes from the beginning of the 2nd century A.D. The Nike on the edges and the Eros in the middle of the long sides carry the garlands. There are Medusa masks on the upper spaces of the garlands, sometimes the portraits of the owners of the tombs and some mythological descriptions take place here. Medusa masks symbolise the protection of the tomb where as the garlands symbolise the meeting of the owner in the other world. Ostoteks are also made in the some manner.  . Against an black background
  • Roman sarcophagus with garland reliefs sculptures, 3rd century AD made in Laodicea on the Lycus from Hierapolis Necropolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Sarcophagus With Garland.<br />
<br />
They were widely used in the valley of Menderes from the beginning of the 2nd century A.D. The Nike on the edges and the Eros in the middle of the long sides carry the garlands. There are Medusa masks on the upper spaces of the garlands, sometimes the portraits of the owners of the tombs and some mythological descriptions take place here. Medusa masks symbolise the protection of the tomb where as the garlands symbolise the meeting of the owner in the other world. Ostoteks are also made in the some manner. . Against a grey background
  • Roman sarcophagus with garland reliefs sculptures, 3rd century AD made in Laodicea on the Lycus from Hierapolis Necropolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Sarcophagus With Garland.<br />
<br />
They were widely used in the valley of Menderes from the beginning of the 2nd century A.D. The Nike on the edges and the Eros in the middle of the long sides carry the garlands. There are Medusa masks on the upper spaces of the garlands, sometimes the portraits of the owners of the tombs and some mythological descriptions take place here. Medusa masks symbolise the protection of the tomb where as the garlands symbolise the meeting of the owner in the other world. Ostoteks are also made in the some manner. Against an art background
  • Roman sarcophagus with garland reliefs sculptures, 3rd century AD made in Laodicea on the Lycus from Hierapolis Necropolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Sarcophagus With Garland.<br />
<br />
They were widely used in the valley of Menderes from the beginning of the 2nd century A.D. The Nike on the edges and the Eros in the middle of the long sides carry the garlands. There are Medusa masks on the upper spaces of the garlands, sometimes the portraits of the owners of the tombs and some mythological descriptions take place here. Medusa masks symbolise the protection of the tomb where as the garlands symbolise the meeting of the owner in the other world. Ostoteks are also made in the some manner.
  • Roman sarcophagus with garland reliefs sculptures, 3rd century AD made in Laodicea on the Lycus from Hierapolis Necropolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Sarcophagus With Garland.<br />
<br />
They were widely used in the valley of Menderes from the beginning of the 2nd century A.D. The Nike on the edges and the Eros in the middle of the long sides carry the garlands. There are Medusa masks on the upper spaces of the garlands, sometimes the portraits of the owners of the tombs and some mythological descriptions take place here. Medusa masks symbolise the protection of the tomb where as the garlands symbolise the meeting of the owner in the other world. Ostoteks are also made in the some manner. . Against an white background
  • Roman sarcophagus with garland reliefs sculptures, 3rd century AD made in Laodicea on the Lycus from Hierapolis Necropolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Sarcophagus With Garland.<br />
<br />
They were widely used in the valley of Menderes from the beginning of the 2nd century A.D. The Nike on the edges and the Eros in the middle of the long sides carry the garlands. There are Medusa masks on the upper spaces of the garlands, sometimes the portraits of the owners of the tombs and some mythological descriptions take place here. Medusa masks symbolise the protection of the tomb where as the garlands symbolise the meeting of the owner in the other world. Ostoteks are also made in the some manner.  . Against an black background
  • Roman sarcophagus with garland reliefs sculptures, 3rd century AD made in Laodicea on the Lycus from Hierapolis Necropolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Sarcophagus With Garland.<br />
<br />
They were widely used in the valley of Menderes from the beginning of the 2nd century A.D. The Nike on the edges and the Eros in the middle of the long sides carry the garlands. There are Medusa masks on the upper spaces of the garlands, sometimes the portraits of the owners of the tombs and some mythological descriptions take place here. Medusa masks symbolise the protection of the tomb where as the garlands symbolise the meeting of the owner in the other world. Ostoteks are also made in the some manner. Against an art background
  • Roman sarcophagus with garland reliefs sculptures, 3rd century AD made in Laodicea on the Lycus from Hierapolis Necropolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Sarcophagus With Garland.<br />
<br />
They were widely used in the valley of Menderes from the beginning of the 2nd century A.D. The Nike on the edges and the Eros in the middle of the long sides carry the garlands. There are Medusa masks on the upper spaces of the garlands, sometimes the portraits of the owners of the tombs and some mythological descriptions take place here. Medusa masks symbolise the protection of the tomb where as the garlands symbolise the meeting of the owner in the other world. Ostoteks are also made in the some manner.
  • Roman sarcophagus with garland reliefs sculptures, 3rd century AD made in Laodicea on the Lycus from Hierapolis Necropolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Sarcophagus With Garland.<br />
<br />
They were widely used in the valley of Menderes from the beginning of the 2nd century A.D. The Nike on the edges and the Eros in the middle of the long sides carry the garlands. There are Medusa masks on the upper spaces of the garlands, sometimes the portraits of the owners of the tombs and some mythological descriptions take place here. Medusa masks symbolise the protection of the tomb where as the garlands symbolise the meeting of the owner in the other world. Ostoteks are also made in the some manner. . Against a grey background
  • Roman sarcophagus with garland reliefs sculptures, 3rd century AD made in Laodicea on the Lycus from Hierapolis Necropolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Sarcophagus With Garland.<br />
<br />
They were widely used in the valley of Menderes from the beginning of the 2nd century A.D. The Nike on the edges and the Eros in the middle of the long sides carry the garlands. There are Medusa masks on the upper spaces of the garlands, sometimes the portraits of the owners of the tombs and some mythological descriptions take place here. Medusa masks symbolise the protection of the tomb where as the garlands symbolise the meeting of the owner in the other world. Ostoteks are also made in the some manner.
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Sarcophagus With Garland.<br />
<br />
They were widely used in the valley of Menderes from the beginning of the 2nd century A.D. The Nike on the edges and the Eros in the middle of the long sides carry the garlands. There are Medusa masks on the upper spaces of the garlands, sometimes the portraits of the owners of the tombs and some mythological descriptions take place here. Medusa masks symbolise the protection of the tomb where as the garlands symbolise the meeting of the owner in the other world. Ostoteks are also made in the some manner. . Against an white background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Sarcophagus With Garland.<br />
<br />
They were widely used in the valley of Menderes from the beginning of the 2nd century A.D. The Nike on the edges and the Eros in the middle of the long sides carry the garlands. There are Medusa masks on the upper spaces of the garlands, sometimes the portraits of the owners of the tombs and some mythological descriptions take place here. Medusa masks symbolise the protection of the tomb where as the garlands symbolise the meeting of the owner in the other world. Ostoteks are also made in the some manner.  . Against an black background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Sarcophagus With Garland.<br />
<br />
They were widely used in the valley of Menderes from the beginning of the 2nd century A.D. The Nike on the edges and the Eros in the middle of the long sides carry the garlands. There are Medusa masks on the upper spaces of the garlands, sometimes the portraits of the owners of the tombs and some mythological descriptions take place here. Medusa masks symbolise the protection of the tomb where as the garlands symbolise the meeting of the owner in the other world. Ostoteks are also made in the some manner. . Against a grey background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Sarcophagus With Garland.<br />
<br />
They were widely used in the valley of Menderes from the beginning of the 2nd century A.D. The Nike on the edges and the Eros in the middle of the long sides carry the garlands. There are Medusa masks on the upper spaces of the garlands, sometimes the portraits of the owners of the tombs and some mythological descriptions take place here. Medusa masks symbolise the protection of the tomb where as the garlands symbolise the meeting of the owner in the other world. Ostoteks are also made in the some manner. Against an art background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Sarcophagus With Garland.<br />
<br />
They were widely used in the valley of Menderes from the beginning of the 2nd century A.D. The Nike on the edges and the Eros in the middle of the long sides carry the garlands. There are Medusa masks on the upper spaces of the garlands, sometimes the portraits of the owners of the tombs and some mythological descriptions take place here. Medusa masks symbolise the protection of the tomb where as the garlands symbolise the meeting of the owner in the other world. Ostoteks are also made in the some manner.
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  black background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  white background
  • Face on three quarter view of the 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  art background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey  background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey art background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  white background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey  background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  black background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey art background
  • Close up of the 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  art background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  white background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  black background
  • Side view of the  2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  art background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey art background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  white background
  • Face on view of the  2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  art background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey  background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey art background
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Aphrodite & Anchises from the Oda first room, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at a seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on Mount Ida. She hold a smalkl Eros in her lap : this is an erotic encounter. The head of Seine [ moon ] appears above the mountain in the top left of the scene. Aineas was the result of this union.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Zeus & Leda, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Zeus disguised as a swan assaults the Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed feet onto the thigh of the stuggling Leda. The swan is supported by a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which was born Helen and the Dioskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes. Cut Out
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Eros and Psique. 3rd century Roman Mosaic from the Alcazar of Cordoba, Spain
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture, an allegory of an athletic contest [ Agon ]  Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The pillar with a bearded head on it is Hermes the god of the gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victiry with a ribbon on a prize table. Two winged baby Eros figures are stuggling over a palm branch acting out the idea of a contest. The youthful figure is Agon himself who holds a palm of victory
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture, an allegory of an athletic contest [ Agon ]  Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The pillar with a bearded head on it is Hermes the god of the gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victiry with a ribbon on a prize table. Two winged baby Eros figures are stuggling over a palm branch acting out the idea of a contest. The youthful figure is Agon himself who holds a palm of victory
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Zeus & Leda, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Zeus disguised as a swan assaults the Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed feet onto the thigh of the stuggling Leda. The swan is supported by a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which was born Helen and the Dioskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes. Cut Out
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Zeus & Leda, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Zeus disguised as a swan assaults the Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed feet onto the thigh of the stuggling Leda. The swan is supported by a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which was born Helen and the Dioskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes. Cut Out
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Aphrodite & Anchises from the Oda first room, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at a seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on Mount Ida. She hold a smalkl Eros in her lap : this is an erotic encounter. The head of Seine [ moon ] appears above the mountain in the top left of the scene. Aineas was the result of this union.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Aphrodite & Anchises from the Oda first room, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at a seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on Mount Ida. She hold a smalkl Eros in her lap : this is an erotic encounter. The head of Seine [ moon ] appears above the mountain in the top left of the scene. Aineas was the result of this union.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Aphrodite & Anchises from the Oda first room, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at a seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on Mount Ida. She hold a smalkl Eros in her lap : this is an erotic encounter. The head of Seine [ moon ] appears above the mountain in the top left of the scene. Aineas was the result of this union.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Aphrodite & Anchises from the Oda first room, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at a seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on Mount Ida. She hold a smalkl Eros in her lap : this is an erotic encounter. The head of Seine [ moon ] appears above the mountain in the top left of the scene. Aineas was the result of this union.
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Reconstruction of  the inside of the Greek Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The rear panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The fresco on the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Reconstruction of  the inside of the Greek Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The rear panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The fresco on the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Reconstruction of  the inside of the Greek Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The rear panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The fresco on the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Reconstruction of  the inside of the Greek Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The rear panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The fresco on the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore] from the Greek city of Poseidonia which became Roman Paestum. This panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore] from the Greek city of Poseidonia which became Roman Paestum. This panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore] from the Greek city of Poseidonia which became Roman Paestum. This panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore] from the Greek city of Poseidonia which became Roman Paestum. This panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The dead man is depicted listenening to the flute of Eros which causes him to be distracted from the real world so being able to enter the next The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety .Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The dead man is depicted listenening to the flute of Eros which causes him to be distracted from the real world so being able to enter the next The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety .Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Lucanian fresco tomb painting of a two men boxing whilst listening to the pipes of Eros. Pastrum 3rd Century BC
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Zeus & Leda, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Zeus disguised as a swan assaults the Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed feet onto the thigh of the stuggling Leda. The swan is supported by a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which was born Helen and the Dioskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes. Cut Out
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture, an allegory of an athletic contest [ Agon ]  Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The pillar with a bearded head on it is Hermes the god of the gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victiry with a ribbon on a prize table. Two winged baby Eros figures are stuggling over a palm branch acting out the idea of a contest. The youthful figure is Agon himself who holds a palm of victory
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture, an allegory of an athletic contest [ Agon ]  Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The pillar with a bearded head on it is Hermes the god of the gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victiry with a ribbon on a prize table. Two winged baby Eros figures are stuggling over a palm branch acting out the idea of a contest. The youthful figure is Agon himself who holds a palm of victory
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture, an allegory of an athletic contest [ Agon ]  Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The pillar with a bearded head on it is Hermes the god of the gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victiry with a ribbon on a prize table. Two winged baby Eros figures are stuggling over a palm branch acting out the idea of a contest. The youthful figure is Agon himself who holds a palm of victory
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Zeus & Leda, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Zeus disguised as a swan assaults the Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed feet onto the thigh of the stuggling Leda. The swan is supported by a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which was born Helen and the Dioskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes. Cut Out
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Zeus & Leda, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Zeus disguised as a swan assaults the Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed feet onto the thigh of the stuggling Leda. The swan is supported by a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which was born Helen and the Dioskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes. Cut Out
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Zeus & Leda, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Zeus disguised as a swan assaults the Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed feet onto the thigh of the stuggling Leda. The swan is supported by a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which was born Helen and the Dioskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes. Cut Out
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Zeus & Leda, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Zeus disguised as a swan assaults the Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed feet onto the thigh of the stuggling Leda. The swan is supported by a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which was born Helen and the Dioskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes. Cut Out
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Aphrodite & Anchises from the Oda first room, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at a seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on Mount Ida. She hold a smalkl Eros in her lap : this is an erotic encounter. The head of Seine [ moon ] appears above the mountain in the top left of the scene. Aineas was the result of this union.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Aphrodite & Anchises from the Oda first room, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at a seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on Mount Ida. She hold a smalkl Eros in her lap : this is an erotic encounter. The head of Seine [ moon ] appears above the mountain in the top left of the scene. Aineas was the result of this union.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Aphrodite & Anchises from the Oda first room, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at a seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on Mount Ida. She hold a smalkl Eros in her lap : this is an erotic encounter. The head of Seine [ moon ] appears above the mountain in the top left of the scene. Aineas was the result of this union.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Aphrodite & Anchises from the Oda first room, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at a seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on Mount Ida. She hold a smalkl Eros in her lap : this is an erotic encounter. The head of Seine [ moon ] appears above the mountain in the top left of the scene. Aineas was the result of this union.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman mosaics - Seasons  Mosaic. Telete Villa.  2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Seasons mosaic Telete, was unearthed during the rescue excavations y Gaziantep Museum in 1994 when it was about to be stolen by the traffickers. It is the floor mosaic of a villa terrace located on the western skins of Zeugma hill <br />
<br />
The pane% consists of nine parts. At the central panel, Eros, who Is a mythological character and who has a crown on his head, sits side by side with Telete, the daughter of Dionysus. This representation symbolises the preparation of a young woman who is just about to taste the love and to become mature. There are busts of seasonal gods In the square panels at the corners. The crowned head of the Spring Goddess Ear Is slightly towards right. She wears a floral necklace. Her righr shoulder is naked and the crimps of her cloak are seen on her left shoulder. There is the bust of the river god on the top-right of the Telete panel. A kid lying on the grass and a bucket are pictured in the lower rectangular panel. In the western-side rectangular panel, on the other hand, there are four fish going in and out of a game basket. There is a rabbit figure within the rectangular panel on the right. Mythical narrations and natural life are intertwined in this mosaic.
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey  background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  black background
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture, an allegory of an athletic contest [ Agon ]  Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The pillar with a bearded head on it is Hermes the god of the gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victiry with a ribbon on a prize table. Two winged baby Eros figures are stuggling over a palm branch acting out the idea of a contest. The youthful figure is Agon himself who holds a palm of victory
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Zeus & Leda, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Zeus disguised as a swan assaults the Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed feet onto the thigh of the stuggling Leda. The swan is supported by a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which was born Helen and the Dioskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes. Cut Out
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Zeus & Leda, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Zeus disguised as a swan assaults the Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed feet onto the thigh of the stuggling Leda. The swan is supported by a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which was born Helen and the Dioskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes. Cut Out
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Reconstruction of  the inside of the Greek Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The rear panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The fresco on the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Aphrodite & Anchises from the Oda first room, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at a seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on Mount Ida. She hold a smalkl Eros in her lap : this is an erotic encounter. The head of Seine [ moon ] appears above the mountain in the top left of the scene. Aineas was the result of this union.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture, an allegory of an athletic contest [ Agon ]  Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The pillar with a bearded head on it is Hermes the god of the gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victiry with a ribbon on a prize table. Two winged baby Eros figures are stuggling over a palm branch acting out the idea of a contest. The youthful figure is Agon himself who holds a palm of victory

FunkyStock Picture Library Resource

Picture The Past

ABOUT

FunkyStock Picture Library free resource for professional editorial picture editors, picture researchers, historical scholars and students and enthusiasts who want to browse some of the best pictures and images of historic countries, historical places, archaeological sites and the very best museum antiquities and artefacts exhibits in Europe and the Middle East.

Pictures and Images can be downloaded or bought as stock photos or photo art prints.

COUNTRIES

Browse travel pictures and images of historic places and archaeological sites of countries in Europe and the Middle East.

VIEW COUNTRIES INDEX....

HISTORICAL

Explore the past through pictures and images of its historic places. See the great palaces, castles and cities of antiquity as well as the great archaeological sites where our ancestors made history.

EXPLORE HISTORICAL PLACES...

MUSEUMS

Browse pictures & images the treasured artefacts and antiquities exhibits from the great Museum of Europe and the Middle East. See the art and objects made by our ancestors.

SEE MUESEUM ANTIQUITIES....