• Zeiss Contessa Nettel folding roll film camera
  • Rolleicord no1176471 with compur shutter
  • Top shot of shredded red cabbage and apple salad on a grey leaf plate
  • traditional children dancers in local german Svab traditional  dress - Annual wine harvest festival ( szuret fesztival ) . Hajos ( Hajós); Hungary
  • traditional children dancers in local german Svab traditional  dress - Annual wine harvest festival ( szuret fesztival ) . Hajos ( Hajós); Hungary
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, from the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, from the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, from the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, from the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, from the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Wooden Gothic sculpture of the Virgin and Child attributeed to Martin Hoffman from the city of Basle, 1507, Switzerland. From the Commandry of Isenheim, Haut Rhin. This sculpture is probably the "big and ancient wooden statue of the Virgin” cited in 1793 in the inventory of the property of the Commandry of Isenheim.  The vervatious deep folds in the Virgins dress, the laughing child Jesus  and the style of Mary were repeatedly imitated in Basel at the beginning of the sixteenth century. This masterpiece of the German late Gothic sculpture was executed in a Basel workshop and can be attributed to Martin Hoffman. Expressive and enigmatic, the style of this masterpiece is the heir of the sculpture schools of Stragbourg and Veit Stoss Franconian art.  Inv RF 1833 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Wooden Gothic sculpture of the Virgin and Child attributeed to Martin Hoffman from the city of Basle, 1507, Switzerland. From the Commandry of Isenheim, Haut Rhin. This sculpture is probably the "big and ancient wooden statue of the Virgin” cited in 1793 in the inventory of the property of the Commandry of Isenheim.  The vervatious deep folds in the Virgins dress, the laughing child Jesus  and the style of Mary were repeatedly imitated in Basel at the beginning of the sixteenth century. This masterpiece of the German late Gothic sculpture was executed in a Basel workshop and can be attributed to Martin Hoffman. Expressive and enigmatic, the style of this masterpiece is the heir of the sculpture schools of Stragbourg and Veit Stoss Franconian art.  Inv RF 1833 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Wooden Gothic sculpture of the Virgin and Child attributeed to Martin Hoffman from the city of Basle, 1507, Switzerland. From the Commandry of Isenheim, Haut Rhin. This sculpture is probably the "big and ancient wooden statue of the Virgin” cited in 1793 in the inventory of the property of the Commandry of Isenheim.  The vervatious deep folds in the Virgins dress, the laughing child Jesus  and the style of Mary were repeatedly imitated in Basel at the beginning of the sixteenth century. This masterpiece of the German late Gothic sculpture was executed in a Basel workshop and can be attributed to Martin Hoffman. Expressive and enigmatic, the style of this masterpiece is the heir of the sculpture schools of Stragbourg and Veit Stoss Franconian art.  Inv RF 1833 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Wooden Gothic sculpture of the Virgin and Child attributeed to Martin Hoffman from the city of Basle, 1507, Switzerland. From the Commandry of Isenheim, Haut Rhin. This sculpture is probably the "big and ancient wooden statue of the Virgin” cited in 1793 in the inventory of the property of the Commandry of Isenheim.  The vervatious deep folds in the Virgins dress, the laughing child Jesus  and the style of Mary were repeatedly imitated in Basel at the beginning of the sixteenth century. This masterpiece of the German late Gothic sculpture was executed in a Basel workshop and can be attributed to Martin Hoffman. Expressive and enigmatic, the style of this masterpiece is the heir of the sculpture schools of Stragbourg and Veit Stoss Franconian art.  Inv RF 1833 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Wooden Gothic sculpture of the Virgin and Child attributeed to Martin Hoffman from the city of Basle, 1507, Switzerland. From the Commandry of Isenheim, Haut Rhin. This sculpture is probably the "big and ancient wooden statue of the Virgin” cited in 1793 in the inventory of the property of the Commandry of Isenheim.  The vervatious deep folds in the Virgins dress, the laughing child Jesus  and the style of Mary were repeatedly imitated in Basel at the beginning of the sixteenth century. This masterpiece of the German late Gothic sculpture was executed in a Basel workshop and can be attributed to Martin Hoffman. Expressive and enigmatic, the style of this masterpiece is the heir of the sculpture schools of Stragbourg and Veit Stoss Franconian art.  Inv RF 1833 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Wooden Gothic sculpture of the Virgin and Child attributeed to Martin Hoffman from the city of Basle, 1507, Switzerland. From the Commandry of Isenheim, Haut Rhin. This sculpture is probably the "big and ancient wooden statue of the Virgin” cited in 1793 in the inventory of the property of the Commandry of Isenheim.  The vervatious deep folds in the Virgins dress, the laughing child Jesus  and the style of Mary were repeatedly imitated in Basel at the beginning of the sixteenth century. This masterpiece of the German late Gothic sculpture was executed in a Basel workshop and can be attributed to Martin Hoffman. Expressive and enigmatic, the style of this masterpiece is the heir of the sculpture schools of Stragbourg and Veit Stoss Franconian art.  Inv RF 1833 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Wooden Gothic sculpture of the Virgin and Child attributeed to Martin Hoffman from the city of Basle, 1507, Switzerland. From the Commandry of Isenheim, Haut Rhin. This sculpture is probably the "big and ancient wooden statue of the Virgin” cited in 1793 in the inventory of the property of the Commandry of Isenheim.  The vervatious deep folds in the Virgins dress, the laughing child Jesus  and the style of Mary were repeatedly imitated in Basel at the beginning of the sixteenth century. This masterpiece of the German late Gothic sculpture was executed in a Basel workshop and can be attributed to Martin Hoffman. Expressive and enigmatic, the style of this masterpiece is the heir of the sculpture schools of Stragbourg and Veit Stoss Franconian art.  Inv RF 1833 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Wooden Gothic sculpture of the Virgin and Child attributeed to Martin Hoffman from the city of Basle, 1507, Switzerland. From the Commandry of Isenheim, Haut Rhin. This sculpture is probably the "big and ancient wooden statue of the Virgin” cited in 1793 in the inventory of the property of the Commandry of Isenheim.  The vervatious deep folds in the Virgins dress, the laughing child Jesus  and the style of Mary were repeatedly imitated in Basel at the beginning of the sixteenth century. This masterpiece of the German late Gothic sculpture was executed in a Basel workshop and can be attributed to Martin Hoffman. Expressive and enigmatic, the style of this masterpiece is the heir of the sculpture schools of Stragbourg and Veit Stoss Franconian art.  Inv RF 1833 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Wooden Gothic sculpture of the Virgin and Child attributeed to Martin Hoffman from the city of Basle, 1507, Switzerland. From the Commandry of Isenheim, Haut Rhin. This sculpture is probably the "big and ancient wooden statue of the Virgin” cited in 1793 in the inventory of the property of the Commandry of Isenheim.  The vervatious deep folds in the Virgins dress, the laughing child Jesus  and the style of Mary were repeatedly imitated in Basel at the beginning of the sixteenth century. This masterpiece of the German late Gothic sculpture was executed in a Basel workshop and can be attributed to Martin Hoffman. Expressive and enigmatic, the style of this masterpiece is the heir of the sculpture schools of Stragbourg and Veit Stoss Franconian art.  Inv RF 1833 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Third Room of The Library. Queen Mary Caroline commissioned  German painter Freidrich Heinrich Fuger to decorate the Third Library Room. The paintings on the wall represent classical themes of: The Parnassus with Apollo and the Three Graces, The Envy and the Richness, The School of Athens, The protection of The Arts. The two globes represent the planisphere and the astral map and were donated to Ferdinand IV of Bourbon by King of France Louis XVI, his brother-in-law. The Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Third Room of The Library. Queen Mary Caroline commissioned  German painter Freidrich Heinrich Fuger to decorate the Third Library Room. The paintings on the wall represent classical themes of: The Parnassus with Apollo and the Three Graces, The Envy and the Richness, The School of Athens, The protection of The Arts. The two globes represent the planisphere and the astral map and were donated to Ferdinand IV of Bourbon by King of France Louis XVI, his brother-in-law. The Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Third Room of The Library. Queen Mary Caroline commissioned  German painter Freidrich Heinrich Fuger to decorate the Third Library Room. The paintings on the wall represent classical themes of: The Parnassus with Apollo and the Three Graces, The Envy and the Richness, The School of Athens, The protection of The Arts. The two globes represent the planisphere and the astral map and were donated to Ferdinand IV of Bourbon by King of France Louis XVI, his brother-in-law. The Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Third Room of The Library. Queen Mary Caroline commissioned  German painter Freidrich Heinrich Fuger to decorate the Third Library Room. The paintings on the wall represent classical themes of: The Parnassus with Apollo and the Three Graces, The Envy and the Richness, The School of Athens, The protection of The Arts. The two globes represent the planisphere and the astral map and were donated to Ferdinand IV of Bourbon by King of France Louis XVI, his brother-in-law. The Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Prejmer ( German: Tartlau) Fortified Church, one of the best preserved of its kind in Eastern Europe was built by the Teutonic Knights in 12 12. Brasov, Transylvania. UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Prejmer ( German: Tartlau) Fortified Church, one of the best preserved of its kind in Eastern Europe was built by the Teutonic Knights in 12 12. Brasov, Transylvania. UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Storage Rooms of Prejmer ( German: Tartlau) Fortified Church, one of the best preserved of its kind in Eastern Europe was built by the Teutonic Knights in 12 12. Brasov, Transylvania. UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Storage Rooms of Prejmer ( German: Tartlau) Fortified Church, one of the best preserved of its kind in Eastern Europe was built by the Teutonic Knights in 12 12. Brasov, Transylvania. UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Prejmer ( German: Tartlau) Fortified Church, one of the best preserved of its kind in Eastern Europe was built by the Teutonic Knights in 12 12. Brasov, Transylvania. UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Prejmer ( German: Tartlau) Fortified Church, one of the best preserved of its kind in Eastern Europe was built by the Teutonic Knights in 12 12. Brasov, Transylvania. UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Prejmer ( German: Tartlau) Fortified Church, one of the best preserved of its kind in Eastern Europe was built by the Teutonic Knights in 12 12. Brasov, Transylvania. UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Prejmer ( German: Tartlau) Fortified Church, one of the best preserved of its kind in Eastern Europe was built by the Teutonic Knights in 12 12. Brasov, Transylvania. UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Prejmer ( German: Tartlau) Fortified Church, one of the best preserved of its kind in Eastern Europe was built by the Teutonic Knights in 12 12. Brasov, Transylvania. UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • traditional children dancers in local german Svab traditional  dress - Annual wine harvest festival ( szuret fesztival ) . Hajos ( Hajós); Hungary
  • traditional children dancers in local german Svab traditional  dress - Annual wine harvest festival ( szuret fesztival ) . Hajos ( Hajós); Hungary
  • traditional children dancers in local german Svab traditional  dress - Annual wine harvest festival ( szuret fesztival ) . Hajos ( Hajós); Hungary
  • traditional dancers in local german Svab traditional  dress - Annual wine harvest festival ( szuret fesztival ) . Hajos ( Hajós); Hungary
  • traditional dancers in local german Svab traditional  dress - Annual wine harvest festival ( szuret fesztival ) . Hajos ( Hajós); Hungary
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Wooden Gothic sculpture of the Virgin and Child attributeed to Martin Hoffman from the city of Basle, 1507, Switzerland. From the Commandry of Isenheim, Haut Rhin. This sculpture is probably the "big and ancient wooden statue of the Virgin” cited in 1793 in the inventory of the property of the Commandry of Isenheim.  The vervatious deep folds in the Virgins dress, the laughing child Jesus  and the style of Mary were repeatedly imitated in Basel at the beginning of the sixteenth century. This masterpiece of the German late Gothic sculpture was executed in a Basel workshop and can be attributed to Martin Hoffman. Expressive and enigmatic, the style of this masterpiece is the heir of the sculpture schools of Stragbourg and Veit Stoss Franconian art.  Inv RF 1833 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Storage Rooms of Prejmer ( German: Tartlau) Fortified Church, one of the best preserved of its kind in Eastern Europe was built by the Teutonic Knights in 12 12. Brasov, Transylvania. UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Storage Rooms of Prejmer ( German: Tartlau) Fortified Church, one of the best preserved of its kind in Eastern Europe was built by the Teutonic Knights in 12 12. Brasov, Transylvania. UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Vew of "la Gravina" ravine and the Sassi of Matera, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic view of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Vew of "la Gravina" ravine and the Sassi of Matera, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic ew of "la Gravina" ravine and the Sassi of Matera, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic ew of "la Gravina" ravine and the Sassi of Matera, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic view of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Vew of "la Gravina" ravine and the Sassi of Matera, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Alexander Severus made between 222 and 235 AD and excavated from Ostia. Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. As emperor, Alexander's peace time reign was prosperous. However militarily Rome was confronted with the rising Sassanid Empire. He managed to check the threat of the Sassanids, but when campaigning against Germanic tribes of Germania, Alexander attempted to bring peace by engaging in diplomacy and bribery. This alienated many in the legions and led to a conspiracy to assassinate and replace him. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Alexander Severus made between 222 and 235 AD and excavated from Ostia. Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. As emperor, Alexander's peace time reign was prosperous. However militarily Rome was confronted with the rising Sassanid Empire. He managed to check the threat of the Sassanids, but when campaigning against Germanic tribes of Germania, Alexander attempted to bring peace by engaging in diplomacy and bribery. This alienated many in the legions and led to a conspiracy to assassinate and replace him. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Alexander Severus made between 222 and 235 AD and excavated from Ostia. Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. As emperor, Alexander's peace time reign was prosperous. However militarily Rome was confronted with the rising Sassanid Empire. He managed to check the threat of the Sassanids, but when campaigning against Germanic tribes of Germania, Alexander attempted to bring peace by engaging in diplomacy and bribery. This alienated many in the legions and led to a conspiracy to assassinate and replace him. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Alexander Severus made between 222 and 235 AD and excavated from Ostia. Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. As emperor, Alexander's peace time reign was prosperous. However militarily Rome was confronted with the rising Sassanid Empire. He managed to check the threat of the Sassanids, but when campaigning against Germanic tribes of Germania, Alexander attempted to bring peace by engaging in diplomacy and bribery. This alienated many in the legions and led to a conspiracy to assassinate and replace him. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Alexander Severus made between 222 and 235 AD and excavated from Ostia. Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. As emperor, Alexander's peace time reign was prosperous. However militarily Rome was confronted with the rising Sassanid Empire. He managed to check the threat of the Sassanids, but when campaigning against Germanic tribes of Germania, Alexander attempted to bring peace by engaging in diplomacy and bribery. This alienated many in the legions and led to a conspiracy to assassinate and replace him. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Alexander Severus made between 222 and 235 AD and excavated from Ostia. Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. As emperor, Alexander's peace time reign was prosperous. However militarily Rome was confronted with the rising Sassanid Empire. He managed to check the threat of the Sassanids, but when campaigning against Germanic tribes of Germania, Alexander attempted to bring peace by engaging in diplomacy and bribery. This alienated many in the legions and led to a conspiracy to assassinate and replace him. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Alexander Severus made between 222 and 235 AD and excavated from Ostia. Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. As emperor, Alexander's peace time reign was prosperous. However militarily Rome was confronted with the rising Sassanid Empire. He managed to check the threat of the Sassanids, but when campaigning against Germanic tribes of Germania, Alexander attempted to bring peace by engaging in diplomacy and bribery. This alienated many in the legions and led to a conspiracy to assassinate and replace him. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Alexander Severus made between 222 and 235 AD and excavated from Ostia. Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. As emperor, Alexander's peace time reign was prosperous. However militarily Rome was confronted with the rising Sassanid Empire. He managed to check the threat of the Sassanids, but when campaigning against Germanic tribes of Germania, Alexander attempted to bring peace by engaging in diplomacy and bribery. This alienated many in the legions and led to a conspiracy to assassinate and replace him. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Alexander Severus made between 222 and 235 AD and excavated from Ostia. Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. As emperor, Alexander's peace time reign was prosperous. However militarily Rome was confronted with the rising Sassanid Empire. He managed to check the threat of the Sassanids, but when campaigning against Germanic tribes of Germania, Alexander attempted to bring peace by engaging in diplomacy and bribery. This alienated many in the legions and led to a conspiracy to assassinate and replace him. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Alexander Severus made between 222 and 235 AD and excavated from Ostia. Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. As emperor, Alexander's peace time reign was prosperous. However militarily Rome was confronted with the rising Sassanid Empire. He managed to check the threat of the Sassanids, but when campaigning against Germanic tribes of Germania, Alexander attempted to bring peace by engaging in diplomacy and bribery. This alienated many in the legions and led to a conspiracy to assassinate and replace him. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Vew of "la Gravina" ravine and the Sassi of Matera, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.

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