• Greek Classical Period Statue of Aphrodite made of Parian marble. Restored by the famous Italian Sculptor A. Canova ( 1757 - 1822 ), Aphrodite is standing nude apart from a richly draped himation which she retains with her left hand in front of her pudenda. 4th c. BC. Athens National Archaeological Museum cat No 3524, from the collection of Lord Hope, donated by M. Embeirikos in 1924.<br />
This statue of Aphrodite is a variant of the Aphrodite (Venus) of Cnidus and is a copy of a 2nd century AD copy of a 4th century  original by the ancient Greek sculptor Praxiteles of Athens. As with the Capitaline Venus, Aphrodite is rising from bathing and is covering her breasts with her right hand, unlike the other known variants of this pose the Aphrodite of the Athens museum is covered from the waste down with a drape.
  • Greek Classical Period Statue of Aphrodite made of Parian marble. Restored by the famous Italian Sculptor A. Canova ( 1757 - 1822 ), Aphrodite is standing nude apart from a richly draped himation which she retains with her left hand in front of her pudenda. 4th c. BC. Athens National Archaeological Museum cat No 3524, from the collection of Lord Hope, donated by M. Embeirikos in 1924.<br />
This statue of Aphrodite is a variant of the Aphrodite (Venus) of Cnidus and is a copy of a 2nd century AD copy of a 4th century  original by the ancient Greek sculptor Praxiteles of Athens. As with the Capitaline Venus, Aphrodite is rising from bathing and is covering her breasts with her right hand, unlike the other known variants of this pose the Aphrodite of the Athens museum is covered from the waste down with a drape.
  • Greek Classical Period Statue of Aphrodite made of Parian marble. Restored by the famous Italian Sculptor A. Canova ( 1757 - 1822 ), Aphrodite is standing nude apart from a richly draped himation which she retains with her left hand in front of her pudenda. 4th c. BC. Athens National Archaeological Museum cat No 3524, from the collection of Lord Hope, donated by M. Embeirikos in 1924.<br />
This statue of Aphrodite is a variant of the Aphrodite (Venus) of Cnidus and is a copy of a 2nd century AD copy of a 4th century  original by the ancient Greek sculptor Praxiteles of Athens. As with the Capitaline Venus, Aphrodite is rising from bathing and is covering her breasts with her right hand, unlike the other known variants of this pose the Aphrodite of the Athens museum is covered from the waste down with a drape.
  • Greek Classical Period Statue of Aphrodite made of Parian marble. Restored by the famous Italian Sculptor A. Canova ( 1757 - 1822 ), Aphrodite is standing nude apart from a richly draped himation which she retains with her left hand in front of her pudenda. 4th c. BC. Athens National Archaeological Museum cat No 3524, from the collection of Lord Hope, donated by M. Embeirikos in 1924.<br />
<br />
This statue of Aphrodite is a variant of the Aphrodite (Venus) of Cnidus and is a copy of a 2nd century AD copy of a 4th century  original by the ancient Greek sculptor Praxiteles of Athens. As with the Capitaline Venus, Aphrodite is rising from bathing and is covering her breasts with her right hand, unlike the other known variants of this pose the Aphrodite of the Athens museum is covered from the waste down with a drape.
  • Greek marble Statue of Hermaphroditius ( Hermaphrodites) a mythical being that has both male & female characteristics. From Pergamum (Bergama) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeology Museum, Inv 363T Cat. Mendel 624.
  • Greek statue of a male figure, 2nd cent B.C Greek Hellenistic period, from Pergamon ( Bergama ) , Turkey. Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 2707 T.
  • Greek statue of a male figure, 2nd cent B.C Greek Hellenistic period, from Pergamon ( Bergama ) , Turkey. Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 2707 T.
  • Greek statue of a male figure, 2nd cent B.C Greek Hellenistic period, from Pergamon ( Bergama ) , Turkey. Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 2707 T.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum exhibit, London.<br />
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Greek statue of a male figure, 2nd cent B.C Greek Hellenistic period, from Pergamon ( Bergama ) , Turkey. Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 2707 T.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Greek  Hellenistic marble statue of Apollo, God of light, fine arts & prophecy, 2nd cent. B.C.  Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 383 T.  Cat. Mendel 548
  • Greek  Hellenistic marble statue of Apollo, God of light, fine arts & prophecy, 2nd cent. B.C.  Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 383 T.  Cat. Mendel 548
  • Greek  Hellenistic marble statue of Apollo, God of light, fine arts & prophecy, 2nd cent. B.C.  Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 383 T.  Cat. Mendel 548
  • Greek Late Hellenistic marble statue of Baeria, from Magnesia AD Maeandrum ( Menderes Manisasi ), temple of Athens, Turkey. Mid 1st cent. B.C .  Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 605 T.  Cat. Mendel 550
  • Greek Late Hellenistic marble statue of Baeria, from Magnesia AD Maeandrum ( Menderes Manisasi ), temple of Athens, Turkey. Mid 1st cent. B.C .  Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 605 T.  Cat. Mendel 550
  • Greek Late Hellenistic marble statue of Baeria, from Magnesia AD Maeandrum ( Menderes Manisasi ), temple of Athens, Turkey. Mid 1st cent. B.C .  Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 605 T.  Cat. Mendel 550
  • Greek marble Statue of Hermaphroditius ( Hermaphrodites) a mythical being that has both male & female characteristics. From Pergamum (Bergama) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeology Museum, Inv 363T Cat. Mendel 624.
  • Greek marble Statue of Hermaphroditius ( Hermaphrodites) a mythical being that has both male & female characteristics. From Pergamum (Bergama) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeology Museum, Inv 363T Cat. Mendel 624.
  • Greek marble Statue of Hermaphroditius ( Hermaphrodites) a mythical being that has both male & female characteristics. From Pergamum (Bergama) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeology Museum, Inv 363T Cat. Mendel 624.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Greek  Hellenistic marble statue of Apollo, God of light, fine arts & prophecy, 2nd cent. B.C.  Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 383 T.  Cat. Mendel 548
  • Greek Late Hellenistic marble statue of Baeria, from Magnesia AD Maeandrum ( Menderes Manisasi ), temple of Athens, Turkey. Mid 1st cent. B.C .  Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 605 T.  Cat. Mendel 550
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Full length view of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso face on view of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso three quarter of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • low full length view of the  Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this period. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Full length tree quarter view of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this peiod. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Upper torso of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this peiod. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Full length face on view of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this peiod. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Full length side view of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this peiod. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Kouros Statues of the Archaic Period. Early 6th c. B.C. (circa 580 B.C.)  Known as Kleovis and Biton, the two boys who heroically pulled their mother on her chariot to the sanctuary where she was to worship. They pulled the chariot for a distance of about 8km. They died the same night peacefully in their sleep according to Herodotus. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Kouros Statues of the Archaic Period. Early 6th c. B.C. (circa 580 B.C.)  Known as Kleovis and Biton, the two boys who heroically pulled their mother on her chariot to the sanctuary where she was to worship. They pulled the chariot for a distance of about 8km. They died the same night peacefully in their sleep according to Herodotus. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Kouros Statues of the Archaic Period. Early 6th c. B.C. (circa 580 B.C.)  Known as Kleovis and Biton, the two boys who heroically pulled their mother on her chariot to the sanctuary where she was to worship. They pulled the chariot for a distance of about 8km. They died the same night peacefully in their sleep according to Herodotus. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Kouros Statues of the Archaic Period. Early 6th c. B.C. (circa 580 B.C.)  Known as Kleovis and Biton, the two boys who heroically pulled their mother on her chariot to the sanctuary where she was to worship. They pulled the chariot for a distance of about 8km. They died the same night peacefully in their sleep according to Herodotus. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Kouros Statues of the Archaic Period. Early 6th c. B.C. (circa 580 B.C.)  Known as Kleovis and Biton, the two boys who heroically pulled their mother on her chariot to the sanctuary where she was to worship. They pulled the chariot for a distance of about 8km. They died the same night peacefully in their sleep according to Herodotus. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture head of Hercules, mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Vale Giardino, Nemi. The head was probably made separately for the insertion onto a statue, probably depicting the gold seated. The work is a copy of a Greek original of the late Hellenistic period, inspired by a statue by the Greek sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon known as the ‘Herakles Epitapezios’ sculpted around 300 BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture head of Hercules, mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Vale Giardino, Nemi. The head was probably made separately for the insertion onto a statue, probably depicting the gold seated. The work is a copy of a Greek original of the late Hellenistic period, inspired by a statue by the Greek sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon known as the ‘Herakles Epitapezios’ sculpted around 300 BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture head of Hercules, mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Vale Giardino, Nemi. The head was probably made separately for the insertion onto a statue, probably depicting the gold seated. The work is a copy of a Greek original of the late Hellenistic period, inspired by a statue by the Greek sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon known as the ‘Herakles Epitapezios’ sculpted around 300 BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture head of Hercules, mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Vale Giardino, Nemi. The head was probably made separately for the insertion onto a statue, probably depicting the gold seated. The work is a copy of a Greek original of the late Hellenistic period, inspired by a statue by the Greek sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon known as the ‘Herakles Epitapezios’ sculpted around 300 BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture head of Hercules, mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Vale Giardino, Nemi. The head was probably made separately for the insertion onto a statue, probably depicting the gold seated. The work is a copy of a Greek original of the late Hellenistic period, inspired by a statue by the Greek sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon known as the ‘Herakles Epitapezios’ sculpted around 300 BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture head of Hercules, mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Vale Giardino, Nemi. The head was probably made separately for the insertion onto a statue, probably depicting the gold seated. The work is a copy of a Greek original of the late Hellenistic period, inspired by a statue by the Greek sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon known as the ‘Herakles Epitapezios’ sculpted around 300 BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture head of Hercules, mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Vale Giardino, Nemi. The head was probably made separately for the insertion onto a statue, probably depicting the gold seated. The work is a copy of a Greek original of the late Hellenistic period, inspired by a statue by the Greek sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon known as the ‘Herakles Epitapezios’ sculpted around 300 BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture head of Hercules, mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Vale Giardino, Nemi. The head was probably made separately for the insertion onto a statue, probably depicting the gold seated. The work is a copy of a Greek original of the late Hellenistic period, inspired by a statue by the Greek sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon known as the ‘Herakles Epitapezios’ sculpted around 300 BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture head of Hercules, mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Vale Giardino, Nemi. The head was probably made separately for the insertion onto a statue, probably depicting the gold seated. The work is a copy of a Greek original of the late Hellenistic period, inspired by a statue by the Greek sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon known as the ‘Herakles Epitapezios’ sculpted around 300 BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture head of Hercules, mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Vale Giardino, Nemi. The head was probably made separately for the insertion onto a statue, probably depicting the gold seated. The work is a copy of a Greek original of the late Hellenistic period, inspired by a statue by the Greek sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon known as the ‘Herakles Epitapezios’ sculpted around 300 BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. . MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. . MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD.Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. . MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. . MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. . MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death.. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death.. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. This panel from the short side of the tomb shows a man with a wreathed wine crater . Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Reconstruction of  the inside of the Greek Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore] from the Greek city of Poseidonia which became Roman Paestum. .   The rear panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables on which goblets have been placed.  The abondon experienced at the Synposium was one way in which the dead could access the next world .  The fresco on the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Reconstruction of  the inside of the Greek Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore] from the Greek city of Poseidonia which became Roman Paestum. .   The rear panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables on which goblets have been placed.  The abondon experienced at the Synposium was one way in which the dead could access the next world .  The fresco on the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Reconstruction of  the inside of the Greek Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The rear panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The fresco on the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Reconstruction of  the inside of the Greek Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The rear panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The fresco on the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore] from the Greek city of Poseidonia which became Roman Paestum. This panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore] from the Greek city of Poseidonia which became Roman Paestum. This panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. This panel is from the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety.  Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. This panel is from the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety.  Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. This panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables on which goblets have been placed.  The abondon experienced at the Synposium was one way in which the dead could access the next world . The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. This panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables on which goblets have been placed.  The abondon experienced at the Synposium was one way in which the dead could access the next world . The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The dead man is depicted listenening to the flute of Eros which causes him to be distracted from the real world so being able to enter the next The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety .Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The dead man is depicted listenening to the flute of Eros which causes him to be distracted from the real world so being able to enter the next The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety .Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. This panel from the short side of the tomb shows a man with a wreathed wine crater . Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. This panel from the short side of the tomb shows a man with a wreathed wine crater . Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Reconstruction of  the inside of the Greek Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore] from the Greek city of Poseidonia which became Roman Paestum. .   The rear panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables on which goblets have been placed.  The abondon experienced at the Synposium was one way in which the dead could access the next world .  The fresco on the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Reconstruction of  the inside of the Greek Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore] from the Greek city of Poseidonia which became Roman Paestum. .   The rear panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables on which goblets have been placed.  The abondon experienced at the Synposium was one way in which the dead could access the next world .  The fresco on the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Reconstruction of  the inside of the Greek Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The rear panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The fresco on the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Reconstruction of  the inside of the Greek Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The rear panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The fresco on the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Reconstruction of  the inside of the Greek Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The rear panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The fresco on the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore] from the Greek city of Poseidonia which became Roman Paestum. This panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore] from the Greek city of Poseidonia which became Roman Paestum. This panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. This panel is from the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety.  Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. This panel is from the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety.  Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. This panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables on which goblets have been placed.  The abondon experienced at the Synposium was one way in which the dead could access the next world . The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. This panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables on which goblets have been placed.  The abondon experienced at the Synposium was one way in which the dead could access the next world . The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The dead man is depicted listenening to the flute of Eros which causes him to be distracted from the real world so being able to enter the next The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety .Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The dead man is depicted listenening to the flute of Eros which causes him to be distracted from the real world so being able to enter the next The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety .Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. This panel from the short side of the tomb shows a man with a wreathed wine crater . Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery. Against a grey background
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.  Against a grey background
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.

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