• The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • Cellar with romanesque arches at the Hellanistic Ionic Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum exhibit, London.<br />
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Roman Great Theatre of Pompeii. Seating up to 5000 spectators the theatre was originally built in Hellanistic time (200-150 B.C)
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Roman Great Theatre of Pompeii. Seating up to 5000 spectators the theatre was originally built in Hellanistic time (200-150 B.C)
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • Cellar with romanesque arches at the Hellanistic Ionic Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Roman Great Theatre of Pompeii. Seating up to 5000 spectators the theatre was originally built in Hellanistic time (200-150 B.C)
  • Greek marble Statue of Hermaphroditius ( Hermaphrodites) a mythical being that has both male & female characteristics. From Pergamum (Bergama) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeology Museum, Inv 363T Cat. Mendel 624.
  • Remains of storage pits & pots at the  Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Byzantine Basilica ruins at the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Remains of storage pits & pots at the  Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Remains of storage pits & pots at the  Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Byzantine Basilica ruins at the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Greek marble Statue of Hermaphroditius ( Hermaphrodites) a mythical being that has both male & female characteristics. From Pergamum (Bergama) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeology Museum, Inv 363T Cat. Mendel 624.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Greek marble Statue of Hermaphroditius ( Hermaphrodites) a mythical being that has both male & female characteristics. From Pergamum (Bergama) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeology Museum, Inv 363T Cat. Mendel 624.
  • Remains of storage pits & pots at the  Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Remains of storage pits & pots at the  Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Remains of storage pits & pots at the  Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Remains of storage pits & pots at the  Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Remains of storage pits & pots at the  Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Remains of storage pits & pots at the  Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Byzantine Basilica ruins at the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Remains of storage pits & pots at the  Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Greek marble Statue of Hermaphroditius ( Hermaphrodites) a mythical being that has both male & female characteristics. From Pergamum (Bergama) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeology Museum, Inv 363T Cat. Mendel 624.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Byzantine Basilica ruins at the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Roman marble sculpture of an Amazon on horseback, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6407 Farnese Collection, Naples Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • Roman marble sculpture of an Amazon on horseback, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6407 Farnese Collection, Naples , Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of an Amazon on horseback, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6407 Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of an Amazon on horseback, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6407 Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • Roman marble sculpture bust of Sophocies, 1st Century AD from an original early 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6133, Museum of Archaeology, Italy Roman marble sculpture bust of Sophocles, 1st Century AD from an original early 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6133, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture bust of Sophocies, 1st Century AD from an original early 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6133, Museum of Archaeology, Italy Roman marble sculpture bust of Sophocles, 1st Century AD from an original early 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6133, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • Roman marble sculpture bust of Sophocies, 1st Century AD from an original early 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6133, Museum of Archaeology, Italy Roman marble sculpture bust of Sophocles, 1st Century AD from an original early 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6133, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • Roman marble sculpture bust of Sophocies, 1st Century AD from an original early 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6133, Museum of Archaeology, Italy Roman marble sculpture bust of Sophocles, 1st Century AD from an original early 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6133, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite 2nd - 1st century BC Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Marine Venus' Type with a dolphin, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy, white background
  • Painted colour verion of end of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd - 1st century BC Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Marine Venus' Type with a dolphin, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey background
  • Full length frontal view of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline' Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, white background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey art background
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey background
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey art background
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Full length view of end of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus) of the Venus Felix Type , copied from a  2nd to 1st century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6300, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238  Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of Faun, a 2nd century AD copy from an original of a late 2nd - 1st century BC late Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6332  Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of Ganymede with an eagle, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC late Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6405, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of Ganymede with an eagle, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC late Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6405, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture bust of Sophocles, Farnese Type, 1st century AD copy from an original 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6413, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 1st century AD Roman marble sculpture of a seated male, copied from a  Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6323, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture known as ‘The Small Women’ the so called Flora, copied from a 4th century BC  Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6404, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture known as ‘The Small Women’ the so called Flora, copied from a 4th century BC  Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6404, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules hand copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • Painted colour verion of Roman marble sculpture of Ganymede with an eagle, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC late Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6405, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of Roman marble sculpture of a warrior on horseback, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6405, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of Roman marble sculpture of an Amazon on horseback, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6407, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey art background
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of Ganymede with an eagle, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC late Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6405, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture bust of Herodotus, 3rd Century AD from an original early 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6146, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 1st century AD Roman marble sculpture of a seated male, copied from a  Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6323, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules hand copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules hand copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Painted colour verion of Roman marble sculpture of a warrior on horseback, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6405, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of end of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline' Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey background
  • Full length frontal view of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • Close up  tree quarter view of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, white background
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283  Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238 Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of Ganymede with an eagle, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC late Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6405, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a warrior on horseback, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6405 Farnese Collection, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture bust of Antisthenes, 2nd century AD copy from an original 340-330 BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6159, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture bust of Antisthenes, 2nd century AD copy from an original 340-330 BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6159, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • Painted colour verion of Roman marble sculpture of Ganymede with an eagle, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC late Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6405, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of end of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline' Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • Full length view of end of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey art background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238  Farnese Collection, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a warrior on horseback, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6405 Farnese Collection, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture bust of Antisthenes, 2nd century AD copy from an original 340-330 BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6159, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 1st century AD Roman marble sculpture of a seated male, copied from a  Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6323, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Anchyrrhoe Nymph - a 2nd century Roman sculpture from Iatly. The Anchyrrhoe Nymph is an allegory of Fortune and was desd in the gardens of the chateau d’Ecouen in the 17th century. The style is copied from a Hellanistic Greek original and also reprints the dance as a muse. Inv No. MR 310 (Usual No Ma 868), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Anchyrrhoe Nymph - a 2nd century Roman sculpture from Iatly. The Anchyrrhoe Nymph is an allegory of Fortune and was desd in the gardens of the chateau d’Ecouen in the 17th century. The style is copied from a Hellanistic Greek original and also reprints the dance as a muse. Inv No. MR 310 (Usual No Ma 868), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite 2nd - 1st century BC Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Marine Venus' Type with a dolphin, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, white background
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite 2nd - 1st century BC Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Marine Venus' Type with a dolphin, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, white background
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • Painted colour verion of Roman marble sculpture of a warrior on horseback, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6405, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of Roman marble sculpture of an Amazon on horseback, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6407, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of end of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of end of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd - 1st century BC Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Marine Venus' Type with a dolphin, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey art background
  • 2nd - 1st century BC Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Marine Venus' Type with a dolphin, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, white background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey background
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, white background
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283 Farnese Collection, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6283 - Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6283 - Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238  Farnese Collection, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238 Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of Faun, a 2nd century AD copy from an original of a late 2nd - 1st century BC late Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6332, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a warrior on horseback, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6405 Farnese Collection, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of an Amazon on horseback, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6407 Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture bust of Antisthenes, 2nd century AD copy from an original 340-330 BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6159, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture bust of Aeschines, 23BC yo 14 AD Augustin copy from an original 340-330 BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6139, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture bust of Aeschines, 23BC yo 14 AD Augustin copy from an original 340-330 BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6139, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture bust of Aeschines, 23BC yo 14 AD Augustin copy from an original 340-330 BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6139, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture bust of Herodotus, 3rd Century AD from an original early 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6146, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 1st century AD Roman marble sculpture of a seated male, copied from a  Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6323, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture known as ‘The Small Women’ the so called Flora, copied from a 4th century BC  Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6404, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules hand copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Anchyrrhoe Nymph - a 2nd century Roman sculpture from Iatly. The Anchyrrhoe Nymph is an allegory of Fortune and was desd in the gardens of the chateau d’Ecouen in the 17th century. The style is copied from a Hellanistic Greek original and also reprints the dance as a muse. Inv No. MR 310 (Usual No Ma 868), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • Anchyrrhoe Nymph - a 2nd century Roman sculpture from Iatly. The Anchyrrhoe Nymph is an allegory of Fortune and was desd in the gardens of the chateau d’Ecouen in the 17th century. The style is copied from a Hellanistic Greek original and also reprints the dance as a muse. Inv No. MR 310 (Usual No Ma 868), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Anchyrrhoe Nymph - a 2nd century Roman sculpture from Iatly. The Anchyrrhoe Nymph is an allegory of Fortune and was desd in the gardens of the chateau d’Ecouen in the 17th century. The style is copied from a Hellanistic Greek original and also reprints the dance as a muse. Inv No. MR 310 (Usual No Ma 868), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus) of the Venus Felix Type , copied from a  2nd to 1st century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6300, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Painted colour verion of Roman marble sculpture of Ganymede with an eagle, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC late Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6405, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of Roman marble sculpture of a warrior on horseback, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6405, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of Roman marble sculpture of an Amazon on horseback, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6407, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline' Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey art background
  • Full length three quarter view of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, white background
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus) of the Venus Felix Type , copied from a  2nd to 1st century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6300, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283 Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238  Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of Faun, a 2nd century AD copy from an original of a late 2nd - 1st century BC late Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6332 - Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a warrior on horseback, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6405, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a warrior on horseback, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6405 Farnese Collection, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture bust of Sophocles, Farnese Type, 1st century AD copy from an original 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6413, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture bust of Sophocles, Farnese Type, 1st century AD copy from an original 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6413, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture bust of Herodotus, 3rd Century AD from an original early 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6146, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture bust of Herodotus, 3rd Century AD from an original early 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6146, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture bust of Pindar, 1 130-140 AD from an original mid 5th century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6144, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 1st century AD Roman marble sculpture of a seated male, copied from a  Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6323, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture known as ‘The Small Women’ the so called Flora, copied from a 4th century BC  Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6404, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules hand copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Anchyrrhoe Nymph - a 2nd century Roman sculpture from Iatly. The Anchyrrhoe Nymph is an allegory of Fortune and was desd in the gardens of the chateau d’Ecouen in the 17th century. The style is copied from a Hellanistic Greek original and also reprints the dance as a muse. Inv No. MR 310 (Usual No Ma 868), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Anchyrrhoe Nymph - a 2nd century Roman sculpture from Iatly. The Anchyrrhoe Nymph is an allegory of Fortune and was desd in the gardens of the chateau d’Ecouen in the 17th century. The style is copied from a Hellanistic Greek original and also reprints the dance as a muse. Inv No. MR 310 (Usual No Ma 868), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus) of the Venus Felix Type , copied from a  2nd to 1st century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6300, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite 2nd - 1st century BC Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Marine Venus' Type with a dolphin, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, white background
  • Painted colour verion of Roman marble sculpture of Ganymede with an eagle, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC late Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6405, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of end of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of end of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd - 1st century BC Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Marine Venus' Type with a dolphin, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, white background
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey art background

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