• Picture & image of an Imperial Hittite orthostat dshowing a King & Queen before an altar from Alacahöyük , Alaca Çorum Province,, Turkey. An Ankara Museum of Anatolian Civilizations exhibit.
  • Picture & image of an Imperial Hittite orthostat dshowing a King & Queen before an altar from  Alacahöyük, Alaca Çorum Province,, Turkey. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Old Bronze age Chalcolithic Period. 3
  • Picture & image of an Imperial Hittite orthostat dshowing a King & Queen before an altar from Alacahöyük, Alaca Çorum Province,, Turkey. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Old Bronze age Chalcolithic Period. 4
  • Picture & image of an Imperial Hittite orthostat dshowing a King & Queen before an altar from Alacahöyük,  Alaca Çorum Province,, Turkey. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Old Bronze age Chalcolithic Period. 5
  • Picture & image of an Imperial Hittite orthostat dshowing a King & Queen before an altar from Alacahöyük, Alaca Çorum Province,, Turkey. Ancora Archaeological Museum.  Old Bronze age Chalcolithic Period.
  • Picture & image of an Imperial Hittite orthostat dshowing a King & Queen before an altar from Alacahöyük , Alaca Çorum Province,, Turkey. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Old Bronze age Chalcolithic Period. 2
  • Picture of Yazilikaya [ i.e written riock ], Hattusa  The largest known Hittite sanctuary. 13th century BC made in the reign of Tudhaliya 1V
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Small Thermal  Baths at Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Canopus, an elongated canal imitating the famous sanctuary of Serapis near Alexandria. The semi-circular exedra of the Serapeum is located at its southern end, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Canopus, an elongated canal imitating the famous sanctuary of Serapis near Alexandria. The semi-circular exedra of the Serapeum is located at its southern end, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Small Thermal  Baths at Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Serapaeum, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Greek Library at Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Small Thermal  Baths at Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Statues and columns that surround a rectangular basin that ends at The Serapaeum, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Serapaeum, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Thermal Grand Baths at Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Thermal Grand Baths at Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Canopus, an elongated canal imitating the famous sanctuary of Serapis near Alexandria. The semi-circular exedra of the Serapeum is located at its southern end, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian’s Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Canopus, an elongated canal imitating the famous sanctuary of Serapis near Alexandria. The semi-circular exedra of the Serapeum is located at its southern end, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian’s Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Tre Esedre Banquet Hall of Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Canopus, an elongated canal imitating the famous sanctuary of Serapis near Alexandria. The semi-circular exedra of the Serapeum is located at its southern end, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian’s Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Statues and columns that surround a rectangular basin that ends at The Serapaeum, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Small Thermal  Baths at Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Canopus, an elongated canal imitating the famous sanctuary of Serapis near Alexandria. The semi-circular exedra of the Serapeum is located at its southern end, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian’s Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Thermal Grand Baths at Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Philosophers Hall ( Sala dei Filosofi ) at Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Tre Esedre Banquet Hall of Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Statues and columns that surround a rectangular basin that ends at The Serapaeum, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Canopus, an elongated canal imitating the famous sanctuary of Serapis near Alexandria. The semi-circular exedra of the Serapeum is located at its southern end, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian’s Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Small Thermal  Baths at Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Marble statue bust of Emperor Hadrian at Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) museum, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Canopus, an elongated canal imitating the famous sanctuary of Serapis near Alexandria. The semi-circular exedra of the Serapeum is located at its southern end, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian’s Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Greek Library at Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Thermal Grand Baths at Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Thermal Grand Baths at Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Thermal Grand Baths at Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Greek Library at Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Roman Statue of an Amazon on horseback and a Barbarian, Circa mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the  Imperial villa near Faro, Italy. An Amazon perched on a rearing horse clashes with a barbarian who attempts to deal a final blow before dying. The work is based on a Hellenistic original from the Pergamon school from the second half of the 2nd cent. B.C, The group was displayed in the Imperial villa  with another of the same theme now in the Borghese collection. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Statue of an Amazon on horseback and a Barbarian, Circa mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the  Imperial villa near Faro, Italy. An Amazon perched on a rearing horse clashes with a barbarian who attempts to deal a final blow before dying. The work is based on a Hellenistic original from the Pergamon school from the second half of the 2nd cent. B.C, The group was displayed in the Imperial villa  with another of the same theme now in the Borghese collection. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros son of zeus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Statue of an Amazon on horseback and a Barbarian, Circa mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the  Imperial villa near Faro, Italy. An Amazon perched on a rearing horse clashes with a barbarian who attempts to deal a final blow before dying. The work is based on a Hellenistic original from the Pergamon school from the second half of the 2nd cent. B.C, The group was displayed in the Imperial villa  with another of the same theme now in the Borghese collection. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Statue of an Amazon on horseback and a Barbarian, Circa mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the  Imperial villa near Faro, Italy. An Amazon perched on a rearing horse clashes with a barbarian who attempts to deal a final blow before dying. The work is based on a Hellenistic original from the Pergamon school from the second half of the 2nd cent. B.C, The group was displayed in the Imperial villa  with another of the same theme now in the Borghese collection. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Statue of an Amazon on horseback and a Barbarian, Circa mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the  Imperial villa near Faro, Italy. An Amazon perched on a rearing horse clashes with a barbarian who attempts to deal a final blow before dying. The work is based on a Hellenistic original from the Pergamon school from the second half of the 2nd cent. B.C, The group was displayed in the Imperial villa  with another of the same theme now in the Borghese collection. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Statue of an Amazon on horseback and a Barbarian, Circa mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the  Imperial villa near Faro, Italy. An Amazon perched on a rearing horse clashes with a barbarian who attempts to deal a final blow before dying. The work is based on a Hellenistic original from the Pergamon school from the second half of the 2nd cent. B.C, The group was displayed in the Imperial villa  with another of the same theme now in the Borghese collection. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros son of zeus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros son of zeus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros son of zeus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros son of zeus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Statue of an Amazon on horseback and a Barbarian, Circa mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the  Imperial villa near Faro, Italy. An Amazon perched on a rearing horse clashes with a barbarian who attempts to deal a final blow before dying. The work is based on a Hellenistic original from the Pergamon school from the second half of the 2nd cent. B.C, The group was displayed in the Imperial villa  with another of the same theme now in the Borghese collection. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Statue of an Amazon on horseback and a Barbarian, Circa mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the  Imperial villa near Faro, Italy. An Amazon perched on a rearing horse clashes with a barbarian who attempts to deal a final blow before dying. The work is based on a Hellenistic original from the Pergamon school from the second half of the 2nd cent. B.C, The group was displayed in the Imperial villa  with another of the same theme now in the Borghese collection. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Statue of an Amazon on horseback and a Barbarian, Circa mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the  Imperial villa near Faro, Italy. An Amazon perched on a rearing horse clashes with a barbarian who attempts to deal a final blow before dying. The work is based on a Hellenistic original from the Pergamon school from the second half of the 2nd cent. B.C, The group was displayed in the Imperial villa  with another of the same theme now in the Borghese collection. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Upper part of a monumental Roman statue of an unknown person possibly a Roman magistrate of Imperial Rome , circa 40BC, inv 15055 Vatican Museum Rome, Italy, grey  background
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Statue of an Amazon on horseback and a Barbarian, Circa mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the  Imperial villa near Faro, Italy. An Amazon perched on a rearing horse clashes with a barbarian who attempts to deal a final blow before dying. The work is based on a Hellenistic original from the Pergamon school from the second half of the 2nd cent. B.C, The group was displayed in the Imperial villa  with another of the same theme now in the Borghese collection. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • The Ares Borghese is a Roman marble statue of the imperial era, 1st or 2nd century AD. This statue possibly preserves some features of an original work in bronze, now lost, of the 5th century BC by Alcamenes, an Athenian sculptor, or the statue may not be a copy of Alcamenes's, but instead a Roman creation according to a classicising or Neo-Attic type. Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Ares Borghese is a Roman marble statue of the imperial era, 1st or 2nd century AD. This statue possibly preserves some features of an original work in bronze, now lost, of the 5th century BC by Alcamenes, an Athenian sculptor, or the statue may not be a copy of Alcamenes's, but instead a Roman creation according to a classicising or Neo-Attic type. Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • The Ares Borghese is a Roman marble statue of the imperial era, 1st or 2nd century AD. This statue possibly preserves some features of an original work in bronze, now lost, of the 5th century BC by Alcamenes, an Athenian sculptor, or the statue may not be a copy of Alcamenes's, but instead a Roman creation according to a classicising or Neo-Attic type. Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Glazed ceramic Ottoman Arabesque Iznik tiled window facade from Haseki Hürrem ( Roxelana or Alexandra Lisowska ) Sultan Medrese, a type of religious school built by Her Imperial Higness , Imperial Princess Consort of the Ottoman Empire, wife of Suleyman the Magnificent, in 1540. From the Pavillion of the Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv. 41/543.
  • Glazed ceramic Ottoman Arabesque Iznik tiled window facade from Haseki Hürrem ( Roxelana or Alexandra Lisowska ) Sultan Medrese, a type of religious school built by Her Imperial Higness , Imperial Princess Consort of the Ottoman Empire, wife of Suleyman the Magnificent, in 1540. From the Pavillion of the Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv. 41/544.
  • Roman relief sculpted sarcophagus of Achilles from Attica. This side shows scenes from the life of Achilles and bears characteristics of the Late Antonines Period of the Roman Imperial Period between 170-190 AD. Adana Archaeology Museum, TurkeyRoman relief sculpted sarcophagus of Achilles from Attica. This side shows two griffin and  bears characteristics of the Late Antonines Period of the Roman Imperial Period between 170-190 AD. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a black background
  • Upper part of a monumental Roman statue of an unknown person possibly a Roman magistrate of Imperial Rome , circa 40BC, inv 15055 Vatican Museum Rome, Italy, black background
  • Upper part of a monumental Roman statue of an unknown person possibly a Roman magistrate of Imperial Rome , circa 40BC, inv 15055 Vatican Museum Rome, Italy, white background
  • Upper part of a monumental Roman statue of an unknown person possibly a Roman magistrate of Imperial Rome , circa 40BC, inv 15055 Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  art background
  • Upper part of a monumental Roman statue of an unknown person possibly a Roman magistrate of Imperial Rome , circa 40BC, inv 15055 Vatican Museum Rome, Italy, grey art background
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • The Ares Borghese is a Roman marble statue of the imperial era, 1st or 2nd century AD. This statue possibly preserves some features of an original work in bronze, now lost, of the 5th century BC by Alcamenes, an Athenian sculptor, or the statue may not be a copy of Alcamenes's, but instead a Roman creation according to a classicising or Neo-Attic type. Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Ares Borghese is a Roman marble statue of the imperial era, 1st or 2nd century AD. This statue possibly preserves some features of an original work in bronze, now lost, of the 5th century BC by Alcamenes, an Athenian sculptor, or the statue may not be a copy of Alcamenes's, but instead a Roman creation according to a classicising or Neo-Attic type. Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • The Ares Borghese is a Roman marble statue of the imperial era, 1st or 2nd century AD. This statue possibly preserves some features of an original work in bronze, now lost, of the 5th century BC by Alcamenes, an Athenian sculptor, or the statue may not be a copy of Alcamenes's, but instead a Roman creation according to a classicising or Neo-Attic type. Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Ares Borghese is a Roman marble statue of the imperial era, 1st or 2nd century AD. This statue possibly preserves some features of an original work in bronze, now lost, of the 5th century BC by Alcamenes, an Athenian sculptor, or the statue may not be a copy of Alcamenes's, but instead a Roman creation according to a classicising or Neo-Attic type. Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Ares Borghese is a Roman marble statue of the imperial era, 1st or 2nd century AD. This statue possibly preserves some features of an original work in bronze, now lost, of the 5th century BC by Alcamenes, an Athenian sculptor, or the statue may not be a copy of Alcamenes's, but instead a Roman creation according to a classicising or Neo-Attic type. Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Artimis and Doe also known as the Diana of Versailles. A 1st- 2nd century Imperial Roman marble statue of the Greek Goddess Artimis ( Roman Diana) copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  Louvre Mueum, Paris. Cat No MA 589<br />
The slightly over life size Diana (goddess of the hunt)  is accompanied by a under life size doe with antlers. She wears a short Dorian chiton, a himation around her waist, and sandals. She is looking to the right and with her right hand is starting to take an arrow out of a quiver on her back. The bow used to be in her left hand which is holding the deers antlers and part of it can be seen in this hand. This was a popular statue with replicas being found at Leptis Magna (Libya) and at Antalya (Turkey).
  • Artimis and Doe also known as the Diana of Versailles. A 1st- 2nd century Imperial Roman marble statue of the Greek Goddess Artimis ( Roman Diana) copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  Louvre Mueum, Paris. Cat No MA 589<br />
The slightly over life size Diana (goddess of the hunt)  is accompanied by a under life size doe with antlers. She wears a short Dorian chiton, a himation around her waist, and sandals. She is looking to the right and with her right hand is starting to take an arrow out of a quiver on her back. The bow used to be in her left hand which is holding the deers antlers and part of it can be seen in this hand. This was a popular statue with replicas being found at Leptis Magna (Libya) and at Antalya (Turkey).
  • Artimis and Doe also known as the Diana of Versailles. A 1st- 2nd century Imperial Roman marble statue of the Greek Goddess Artimis ( Roman Diana) copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  Louvre Mueum, Paris. Cat No MA 589<br />
The slightly over life size Diana (goddess of the hunt)  is accompanied by a under life size doe with antlers. She wears a short Dorian chiton, a himation around her waist, and sandals. She is looking to the right and with her right hand is starting to take an arrow out of a quiver on her back. The bow used to be in her left hand which is holding the deers antlers and part of it can be seen in this hand. This was a popular statue with replicas being found at Leptis Magna (Libya) and at Antalya (Turkey).
  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Glazed ceramic Ottoman Arabesque Iznik tiled window facade from Haseki Hürrem ( Roxelana or Alexandra Lisowska ) Sultan Medrese, a type of religious school built by Her Imperial Higness , Imperial Princess Consort of the Ottoman Empire, wife of Suleyman the Magnificent, in 1540. From the Pavillion of the Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv. 41/543.
  • Glazed ceramic Ottoman Arabesque Iznik tiled window facade from Haseki Hürrem ( Roxelana or Alexandra Lisowska ) Sultan Medrese, a type of religious school built by Her Imperial Higness , Imperial Princess Consort of the Ottoman Empire, wife of Suleyman the Magnificent, in 1540. From the Pavillion of the Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv. 41/543.
  • Glazed ceramic Ottoman Arabesque Iznik tiled window facade from Haseki Hürrem ( Roxelana or Alexandra Lisowska ) Sultan Medrese, a type of religious school built by Her Imperial Higness , Imperial Princess Consort of the Ottoman Empire, wife of Suleyman the Magnificent, in 1540. From the Pavillion of the Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv. 41/544.
  • Glazed ceramic Ottoman Arabesque Iznik tiled window facade from Haseki Hürrem ( Roxelana or Alexandra Lisowska ) Sultan Medrese, a type of religious school built by Her Imperial Higness , Imperial Princess Consort of the Ottoman Empire, wife of Suleyman the Magnificent, in 1540. From the Pavillion of the Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv. 41/544.
  • Excavations of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of the goddess Herma (day), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Goddess  Herma or Day steadies a dramatically billowing cloak that frames her head. The motif , also visible on the Okeanos relief, indicates flying, floating and divine epiphany - the appearance of gods to mortals. Day would be paired with night : together they signify the eternity of the Roman imperial order.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of the goddess Herma (day), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess  Herma or Day steadies a dramatically billowing cloak that frames her head. The motif , also visible on the Okeanos relief, indicates flying, floating and divine epiphany - the appearance of gods to mortals. Day would be paired with night : together they signify the eternity of the Roman imperial order.
  • Roman SSebasteion relief sculpture of the goddess Herma (day), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Goddess  Herma or Day steadies a dramatically billowing cloak that frames her head. The motif , also visible on the Okeanos relief, indicates flying, floating and divine epiphany - the appearance of gods to mortals. Day would be paired with night : together they signify the eternity of the Roman imperial order.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of the goddess Herma (day), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Goddess  Herma or Day steadies a dramatically billowing cloak that frames her head. The motif , also visible on the Okeanos relief, indicates flying, floating and divine epiphany - the appearance of gods to mortals. Day would be paired with night : together they signify the eternity of the Roman imperial order.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of the goddess Herma (day), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Goddess  Herma or Day steadies a dramatically billowing cloak that frames her head. The motif , also visible on the Okeanos relief, indicates flying, floating and divine epiphany - the appearance of gods to mortals. Day would be paired with night : together they signify the eternity of the Roman imperial order.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion releif sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion releif sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion releif sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Close up of a RomanSebasteion relief  sculpture of Roma armed, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Roma is equipped with a spear, helmet, round shield and imperial style armour. Blow crouches a naked bearded prisoner, with hands tied behind his back and a skin knotted around his neck. He turns to look up at Roma
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Roma armed, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Roma is equipped with a spear, helmet, round shield and imperial style armour. Blow crouches a naked bearded prisoner, with hands tied behind his back and a skin knotted around his neck. He turns to look up at Roma
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Roma armed, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Roma is equipped with a spear, helmet, round shield and imperial style armour. Blow crouches a naked bearded prisoner, with hands tied behind his back and a skin knotted around his neck. He turns to look up at Roma
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion  relief  sculpture of Roma armed, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Roma is equipped with a spear, helmet, round shield and imperial style armour. Blow crouches a naked bearded prisoner, with hands tied behind his back and a skin knotted around his neck. He turns to look up at Roma
  • Close up of a RomanSebasteion relief  sculpture of Roma armed, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Roma is equipped with a spear, helmet, round shield and imperial style armour. Blow crouches a naked bearded prisoner, with hands tied behind his back and a skin knotted around his neck. He turns to look up at Roma
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Roma armed, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Roma is equipped with a spear, helmet, round shield and imperial style armour. Blow crouches a naked bearded prisoner, with hands tied behind his back and a skin knotted around his neck. He turns to look up at Roma
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Roma armed, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Roma is equipped with a spear, helmet, round shield and imperial style armour. Blow crouches a naked bearded prisoner, with hands tied behind his back and a skin knotted around his neck. He turns to look up at Roma
  • Roman Sebastian relief  sculpture of Roma armed, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Roma is equipped with a spear, helmet, round shield and imperial style armour. Blow crouches a naked bearded prisoner, with hands tied behind his back and a skin knotted around his neck. He turns to look up at Roma
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Roma armed, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Roma is equipped with a spear, helmet, round shield and imperial style armour. Blow crouches a naked bearded prisoner, with hands tied behind his back and a skin knotted around his neck. He turns to look up at Roma
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Roma armed, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Roma is equipped with a spear, helmet, round shield and imperial style armour. Blow crouches a naked bearded prisoner, with hands tied behind his back and a skin knotted around his neck. He turns to look up at Roma
  • Roman relief sculpted sarcophagus of Achilles from Attica. This side shows two griffin and  bears characteristics of the Late Antonines Period of the Roman Imperial Period between 170-190 AD. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey.. Against a white background
  • Roman relief sculpted sarcophagus of Achilles from Attica. This side shows two griffin and  bears characteristics of the Late Antonines Period of the Roman Imperial Period between 170-190 AD. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a black background
  • Roman relief sculpted sarcophagus of Achilles from Attica. This side shows two griffin and  bears characteristics of the Late Antonines Period of the Roman Imperial Period between 170-190 AD. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey.
  • Roman relief sculpted sarcophagus of Achilles from Attica. This side shows two griffin and  bears characteristics of the Late Antonines Period of the Roman Imperial Period between 170-190 AD. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey.
  • Roman relief sculpted sarcophagus of Achilles from Attica. This side shows two griffin and  bears characteristics of the Late Antonines Period of the Roman Imperial Period between 170-190 AD. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey.
  • Roman relief sculpted sarcophagus of Achilles from Attica. This side shows scenes from the life of Achilles and bears characteristics of the Late Antonines Period of the Roman Imperial Period between 170-190 AD. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey
  • Roman relief sculpted sarcophagus of Achilles from Attica. This side shows scenes from the life of Achilles and bears characteristics of the Late Antonines Period of the Roman Imperial Period between 170-190 AD. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a white background
  • Roman relief sculpted sarcophagus of Achilles from Attica. This side shows scenes from the life of Achilles and bears characteristics of the Late Antonines Period of the Roman Imperial Period between 170-190 AD. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a warm art background
  • Roman relief sculpted sarcophagus of Achilles from Attica. This side shows scenes from the life of Achilles and bears characteristics of the Late Antonines Period of the Roman Imperial Period between 170-190 AD. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey
  • Roman relief sculpted sarcophagus of Achilles from Attica. This side shows scenes from the life of Achilles and bears characteristics of the Late Antonines Period of the Roman Imperial Period between 170-190 AD. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.

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