• Aurochs relief pictures on glazed bricks from the Ishtar Gate, Babylon, Iraq constructed in about 575 BC by order of King Nebuchadnezzar II on the north side of the city. Dedicated to the Babylonian goddess Ishtar, the monumental gate joined the inner & outer walls of Babylon it was one of the Seven Wonders of the ancient world. Istanbul Archaeological Museum.
  • Aurochs relief pictures on glazed bricks from the Ishtar Gate, Babylon, Iraq constructed in about 575 BC by order of King Nebuchadnezzar II on the north side of the city. Dedicated to the Babylonian goddess Ishtar, the monumental gate joined the inner & outer walls of Babylon it was one of the Seven Wonders of the ancient world. Istanbul Archaeological Museum.
  • Lion relief on glazed bricks from the Ishtar Gate, Babylon, Iraq constructed in about 575 BC by order of King Nebuchadnezzar II on the north side of the city. Dedicated to the Babylonian goddess Ishtar, the monumental gate joined the inner & outer walls of Babylon it was one of the Seven Wonders of the ancient world. Istanbul Archaeological Museum.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a protective spirits,  from Nimrud, Iraq. The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding.   865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room G, door e, panel 1.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 124586
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 118921
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 118921
  • Neo-Assyrian basalt statue of King Shalmaneser III (858-824 B.C) . Inscription reads "Shalmaneser, the great king, the mighty king, king of all four region, the powerful and the mighty rival of the princes of the whole earth the great ones, the kings, son of Assur-Nasirapli, King of the universe, King of Assyria, grandson of ~Tukultiu-Ninurta, King of the Universe, King of Assyria". The inscription continues with his campaigns &b deeds in Uratu, Syria, Que & Tabal ending " At the time I rebuilt the walls of my city Ashur from their foundations to their summits. I made an image of my royal self and set it up in the metal gate". From Assur ( Qala't Sharqat) Iraq. Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv no. 4650.
  • 8th Cent. B.C Babylonian limestone funereal stele with inscription & relief sculpture of the governor of Mari and Suhi praying to the Gods from the Palace Museum Babylon, Iraq. The inscription states that the governor reigned for 13 years and built the city of Gabarri-ibni also making canals for new date palm cultivation in different cities, and working on the development of agriculture in the city of Suhi. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 7815
  • 8th Cent. B.C Babylonian limestone funereal stele with inscription & relief sculpture of the governor of Mari and Suhi praying to the Gods from the Palace Museum Babylon, Iraq. The inscription states that the governor reigned for 13 years and built the city of Gabarri-ibni also making canals for new date palm cultivation in different cities, and working on the development of agriculture in the city of Suhi. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 7815
  • 8th Cent. B.C Babylonian limestone  stele with inscription & relief sculpture of the governor of Mari and Suhi praying to the Gods from the Palace Museum Babylon, Iraq. The inscription states that the governor reigned for 13 years and built the city of Gabarri-ibni also making canals for new date palm cultivation in different cities, and working on the development of agriculture in the city of Suhi. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 7815
  • 8th Cent. B.C Babylonian limestone funereal stele with inscription & relief sculpture of the governor of Mari and Suhi praying to the Gods from the Palace Museum Babylon, Iraq. The inscription states that the governor reigned for 13 years and built the city of Gabarri-ibni also making canals for new date palm cultivation in different cities, and working on the development of agriculture in the city of Suhi. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 7815
  • 8th Cent. B.C Babylonian limestone funereal stele with inscription & relief sculpture of the governor of Mari and Suhi praying to the Gods from the Palace Museum Babylon, Iraq. The inscription states that the governor reigned for 13 years and built the city of Gabarri-ibni also making canals for new date palm cultivation in different cities, and working on the development of agriculture in the city of Suhi. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 7815
  • Dragon relief on glazed bricks from the Ishtar Gate, Babylon, Iraq constructed in about 575 BC by order of King Nebuchadnezzar II on the north side of the city. Dedicated to the Babylonian goddess Ishtar, the monumental gate joined the inner & outer walls of Babylon it was one of the Seven Wonders of the ancient world. Istanbul Archaeological Museum.
  • Aurochs relief pictures on glazed bricks from the Ishtar Gate, Babylon, Iraq constructed in about 575 BC by order of King Nebuchadnezzar II on the north side of the city. Dedicated to the Babylonian goddess Ishtar, the monumental gate joined the inner & outer walls of Babylon it was one of the Seven Wonders of the ancient world. Istanbul Archaeological Museum.
  • Lion relief on glazed bricks from the Ishtar Gate, Babylon, Iraq constructed in about 575 BC by order of King Nebuchadnezzar II on the north side of the city. Dedicated to the Babylonian goddess Ishtar, the monumental gate joined the inner & outer walls of Babylon it was one of the Seven Wonders of the ancient world. Istanbul Archaeological Museum.
  • Lion relief on glazed bricks from the Ishtar Gate, Babylon, Iraq constructed in about 575 BC by order of King Nebuchadnezzar II on the north side of the city. Dedicated to the Babylonian goddess Ishtar, the monumental gate joined the inner & outer walls of Babylon it was one of the Seven Wonders of the ancient world. Istanbul Archaeological Museum.
  • Lion relief on glazed bricks from the Ishtar Gate, Babylon, Iraq constructed in about 575 BC by order of King Nebuchadnezzar II on the north side of the city. Dedicated to the Babylonian goddess Ishtar, the monumental gate joined the inner & outer walls of Babylon it was one of the Seven Wonders of the ancient world. Istanbul Archaeological Museum.
  • Lion relief on glazed bricks from the Ishtar Gate, Babylon, Iraq constructed in about 575 BC by order of King Nebuchadnezzar II on the north side of the city. Dedicated to the Babylonian goddess Ishtar, the monumental gate joined the inner & outer walls of Babylon it was one of the Seven Wonders of the ancient world. Istanbul Archaeological Museum.
  • Lion relief on glazed bricks from the Ishtar Gate, Babylon, Iraq constructed in about 575 BC by order of King Nebuchadnezzar II on the north side of the city. Dedicated to the Babylonian goddess Ishtar, the monumental gate joined the inner & outer walls of Babylon it was one of the Seven Wonders of the ancient world. Istanbul Archaeological Museum.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of an eagle headed  protective spirit holding a symbolic cone.  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace, room F, panel 8.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 118804.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel detail of a hand holding a mace.  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace.   British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King  Ashurnasirpal II dressed in Ritual robes, he is depicted twice on either side of the central sacred tree of life.  Above the tree of life is a winged disc with possible the sun god Shamash in it.  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Room B, panel 23.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124531.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a protective spirits,  from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room G, door e, panel 1.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 124586
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of an eagle headed protective spirit  from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room F, panel 3.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 124584-5
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a female protective spirit  from Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 124581
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit from Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room Z.  ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 118874
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel detail of a hand holding a bucket of holy water.  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace.   British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a female protective spirit  from Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 124581
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit holdingpomegrantes from Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room Z.  ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 118874
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq. The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room G, panelled d1. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 124576
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of an eagle headed  protective spirit holding a symbolic cone and a bucket of holy water.  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace, room F, panel 8.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 118804.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  from Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq. The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room G, panelled d1. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 124576
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  from Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King Ashurnaspiral II enthroned between two attendants. The group is flanked by winged protective spirits. The panel is possibly from a banquet hall..  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Room G, panels 2-4.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124564-6.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King  Ashurnasirpal II dressed in Ritual robes, he is depicted twice on either side of the central sacred tree of life, flanked by winged protective spirits holding a bucket with holy water which they are sprinking with a symbolic pine cone. Above the tree of life is a winged disc with possible the sun god Shamash in it.  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Room B, panel 23.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124531.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of Tribute bearers, the first one has a turban from north-west Syria and raises his clenched hands as a token of submission. The second person may be Phoenician and has a pair of monkeys to add the Assyrian kings exotic animal collection .  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Court D, panel 7.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124502.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a female protective spirits  from Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 124581
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King Ashurnaspiral II with his sword and a staff. The panel is possibly from his private apartments..  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Room S, panel 3.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124563.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King Ashurnaspiral II, right, and a winged protective spirit holding a bucket of holy water in one hand and a cone in the other..  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit .
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King  Ashurnasirpal II demonstrating his perfect kingship by raising a ritual bowl whilst an attendant waves a whisk to maintain the king's purity.  From Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a protective spirits holding a bucket of holy water wearing a rosette bracelet which symbolises divine power. From Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room S, door c.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 118803
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a female protective spirits  from Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King Ashurnasirpal flanked by  eagle headed protective spirits who are sprinkling him with holy water from the buckets they are holding from symbolic fir cones. From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room F, panel 3-4.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 124584-5
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 118921
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room G, panelled d1. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 124576
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King Ashurnaspiral II, right, and a winged protective spirit holding a bucket of holy water in one hand and a cone in the other..  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit .
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King  Ashurnasirpal II demonstrating his perfect kingship by raising a ritual bowl whilst an attendant waves a whisk to maintain the king's purity.  From Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King Ashurnaspiral II enthroned between two attendants. The group is flanked by winged protective spirits. The panel is possibly from a banquet hall..  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Room G, panels 2-4.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124564-6.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King Ashurnaspiral II with his sword and a staff. The panel is possibly from his private apartments..  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Room S, panel 3.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124563.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of Tribute bearers, the first one has a turban from north-west Syria and raises his clenched hands as a token of submission. The second person may be Phoenician and has a pair of monkeys to add the Assyrian kings exotic animal collection .  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Court D, panel 7.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124502.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King  Ashurnasirpal II dressed in Ritual robes, he is depicted twice on either side of the central sacred tree of life, flanked by winged protective spirits holding a bucket with holy water which they are sprinking with a symbolic pine cone. Above the tree of life is a winged disc with possible the sun god Shamash in it.  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Room B, panel 23.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124531.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King  Ashurnasirpal II demonstrating his perfect kingship by raising a ritual bowl whilst an attendant waves a whisk to maintain the king's purity.  From Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a female protective spirits  from Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a female protective spirits  from Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 124581
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King Ashurnasirpal flanked by  eagle headed protective spirits,  from Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room F, panel 3-4.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 124584-5
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a protective spirits holding a bucket of holy water wearing a rosette bracelet which symbolises divine power. From Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room S, door c.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 118803
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room G, panelled d1. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 124576
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room G, panelled d1. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 124576
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King Ashurnaspiral II, right, and a winged protective spirit holding a bucket of holy water in one hand and a cone in the other..  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit .
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King Ashurnaspiral II enthroned between two attendants. The group is flanked by winged protective spirits. The panel is possibly from a banquet hall..  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Room G, panels 2-4.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124564-6.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King Ashurnaspiral II with his sword and a staff. The panel is possibly from his private apartments..  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Room S, panel 3.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124563.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of Tribute bearers, the first one has a turban from north-west Syria and raises his clenched hands as a token of submission. The second person may be Phoenician and has a pair of monkeys to add the Assyrian kings exotic animal collection .  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Court D, panel 7.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124502.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King  Ashurnasirpal II dressed in Ritual robes, he is depicted twice on either side of the central sacred tree of life, flanked by winged protective spirits holding a bucket with holy water which they are sprinking with a symbolic pine cone. Above the tree of life is a winged disc with possible the sun god Shamash in it.  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Room B, panel 23.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124531.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a female protective spirits  from Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a female protective spirits  from Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 124581
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a protective spirits holding a bucket of holy water wearing a rosette bracelet which symbolises divine power. From Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room S, door c.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 118803
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King Ashurnasirpal flanked by  eagle headed protective spirits,  from Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room F, panel 3-4.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 124584-5
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King  Ashurnasirpal II demonstrating his perfect kingship by raising a ritual bowl whilst an attendant waves a whisk to maintain the king's purity.  From Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King Ashurnaspiral II, right, and a winged protective spirit holding a bucket of holy water in one hand and a cone in the other..  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit .
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a female protective spirits  from Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a protective spirits holding a bucket of holy water wearing a rosette bracelet which symbolises divine power. From Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room S, door c.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 118803
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room G, panelled d1. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 124576
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 118921
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of Ashurnasirpal on his chariot at the begining of a lion hunt.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no ME 124858
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King Ashurnaspiral II enthroned between two attendants. The group is flanked by winged protective spirits. The panel is possibly from a banquet hall..  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Room G, panels 2-4.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124564-6.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel from the  lion hunt showing a dying lion.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no ME 124864
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of Tribute bearers, the first one has a turban from north-west Syria and raises his clenched hands as a token of submission. The second person may be Phoenician and has a pair of monkeys to add the Assyrian kings exotic animal collection .  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Court D, panel 7.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124502.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King Ashurnaspiral II with his sword and a staff. The panel is possibly from his private apartments..  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Room S, panel 3.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124563.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel from the  lion hunt showing a dying lion.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no ME 124863-4
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel `from the  lion hunt showing a dying lion.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no ME 124857
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel from the  lion hunt showing a dying lion.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no ME 124863-4
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel from the  lion hunt showing a dying lion.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no ME 124856
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of spearmen lining the road from the King Ashurnasirpal lion hunt.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no ME 120859
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King  Ashurnasirpal II dressed in Ritual robes, he is depicted twice on either side of the central sacred tree of life, flanked by winged protective spirits holding a bucket with holy water which they are sprinking with a symbolic pine cone. Above the tree of life is a winged disc with possible the sun god Shamash in it.  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Room B, panel 23.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124531.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King Ashurnasirpal flanked by  eagle headed protective spirits,  from Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room F, panel 3-4.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 124584-5
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a female protective spirits  from Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 124581
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of Ashurnasirpal lion hunting.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of Ashurnasirpal stabbing his sword into a lions neck during a lion hunting.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no ME 124850
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of soldiers lining the road from the King Ashurnasirpal lion hunt.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no ME 120859
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of Ashurnasirpal lion hunting.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no ME 124867
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of Ashurnasirpal on his chariot aiming an arrow during a lion hunt.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no ME 124867
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of Ashurnasirpal lion hunting.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a lion being hunted.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of Ashurnasirpal lion hunting.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of Ashurnasirpal lion hunting.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of Ashurnasirpal lion hunting.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no ME 124876.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of Ashurnasirpal lion hunting.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no ME 124876.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of Ashurnasirpal lion hunting.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of Ashurnasirpal lion hunting.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no ME 124876.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of Ashurnasirpal lion hunting.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no  ME 124875.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of man stretching a net across the escape route of a herb of deer that are being hunted.  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North Palace, room S, panel 17-18.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124871.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of Ashurnasirpal lion hunting.  From Nineveh  North Palace, Iraq,  668-627 B.C.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no ME 124876.
  • Sculpted Assyrian relief panels of Royal Chariot & Guards  from Hadatu ( Aslantas ) around 800 B.C. Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv No. 1946
  • Sculpted Assyrian relief panels of mace bearers from Hadatu ( Aslantas ) around 800 B.C. Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv No. 14-10
  • Sculpted Assyrian relief panels of Royal Chariot & Guards  from Hadatu ( Aslantas ) around 800 B.C. Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv No. 1946
  • Sculpted Assyrian relief panels of Royal Chariot & Guards  from Hadatu ( Aslantas ) around 800 B.C. Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv No. 1946
  • Sculpted Assyrian relief panels of mace bearers from Hadatu ( Aslantas ) around 800 B.C. Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv No. 14-10
  • Sculpted Assyrian relief panels of Royal Chariot & Guards  from Hadatu ( Aslantas ) around 800 B.C. Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv No. 1946
  • Sculpted Assyrian relief panels of mace bearers from Hadatu ( Aslantas ) around 800 B.C. Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv No. 14-10
  • Chaldean Assyrian relief sculpture slab from the northwest palace of King Ashurnasirpal II of a Genie standing. 881-859 B.C form Nimrud or Nimrut ( Kalhu or Kalah). Istanbul Archaeological exhibit Inv. No. 5.
  • Chaldean Assyrian relief sculpture slab from the northwest palace of King Ashurnasirpal II of a Genie standing. 881-859 B.C form Nimrud or Nimrut ( Kalhu or Kalah). Istanbul Archaeological exhibit Inv. No. 5.
  • Chaldean Assyrian relief sculpture slab from the northwest palace of King Ashurnasirpal II of a Genie standing. 881-859 B.C form Nimrud or Nimrut ( Kalhu or Kalah). Istanbul Archaeological exhibit Inv. No. 5.
  • Chaldean Assyrian relief sculpture slab from the northwest palace of King Ashurnasirpal II of a Genie standing. 881-859 B.C form Nimrud or Nimrut ( Kalhu or Kalah). Istanbul Archaeological exhibit Inv. No. 5.
  • Sculpted Assyrian relief panels of mace bearers from Hadatu ( Aslantas ) around 800 B.C. Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv No. 14-10
  • Limestone Sculpted relief Stele with inscription to King Sennacherib. The relief shows Assyrian King Sennacherib  praying in front of divine symbols. 705 - 681 B.C Nineveh ( Kuyunjik ) . The inscription tells of King Sennacherib's great feats of war and the building works in Nineveh. It starts " Sennacheribs, the great king, mighty king, king of the universe, king of the Assyria, king of the four regions of the wold, favourite of the great gods". It continues " I led my armies from one end of the earth to the other and brought in submission at my feet all princes, dwelling in palaces, of the four quarters of the world". of his great worked " I enlarged the site of Nineveh, my royal city, I made its market streets wider". further " The wall and outer wall I caused skilfully constructed and raised them mountain high. I widened them to 100 cubits ( 50m )". Istanbul Archaeological Exhibit no. 1.
  • Sculpted Assyrian relief panels of mace bearers from Hadatu ( Aslantas ) around 800 B.C. Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv No. 14-10
  • Sculpted Assyrian relief panels of Royal Chariot & Guards  from Hadatu ( Aslantas ) around 800 B.C. Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv No. 1946
  • Chaldean Assyrian relief sculpture slab from the northwest palace of King Ashurnasirpal II of a Genie standing. 881-859 B.C form Nimrud or Nimrut ( Kalhu or Kalah). Istanbul Archaeological exhibit Inv. No. 5.
  • Chaldean Assyrian relief sculpture slab from the northwest palace of King Ashurnasirpal II of a Genie standing. 881-859 B.C form Nimrud or Nimrut ( Kalhu or Kalah). Istanbul Archaeological exhibit Inv. No. 5.
  • Chaldean Assyrian relief sculpture slab from the northwest palace of King Ashurnasirpal II of a Genie standing in front of the tree of life. 881-859 B.C form Nimrud or Nimrut ( Kalhu or Kalah). Istanbul Archaeological exhibit Inv. No. 4.
  • Chaldean Assyrian relief sculpture slab from the northwest palace of King Ashurnasirpal II of a Genie standing. 881-859 B.C form Nimrud or Nimrut ( Kalhu or Kalah). Istanbul Archaeological exhibit Inv. No. 6.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, from the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, from the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, from the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, from the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, from the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy

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