• Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Babylonian Hammurabi stone relief sculpture. Hammurabi was the sixth Amorite king of Babylon from 1792 BC to 1750 BC . Hammurabi (standing), depicted as receiving his royal insignia from Shamash. Hammurabi holds his hands over his mouth as a sign of prayer. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture reporting the spoils of war, 12th cent.BC. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Babylonian stone relief sculpture. announcing a land deed of Adad-apla-iddina, 4th Dynasty king of Babylon from 1067 BC to 1046 BC . Copied from an original in the Pushkin Museum, Moscow. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, from the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Babylonian stone relief sculpture. announcing a land deed of Adad-apla-iddina, 4th Dynasty king of Babylon from 1067 BC to 1046 BC . Copied from an original in the Pushkin Museum, Moscow. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, from the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture reporting the spoils of war, 12th cent.BC. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture reporting the spoils of war, 12th cent.BC. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Babylonian stone relief sculpture. announcing a land deed of Adad-apla-iddina, 4th Dynasty king of Babylon from 1067 BC to 1046 BC . Copied from an original in the Pushkin Museum, Moscow. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Babylonian Hammurabi stone relief sculpture. Hammurabi was the sixth Amorite king of Babylon from 1792 BC to 1750 BC . Hammurabi (standing), depicted as receiving his royal insignia from Shamash. Hammurabi holds his hands over his mouth as a sign of prayer. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Babylonian stone relief sculpture. announcing a land deed of Adad-apla-iddina, 4th Dynasty king of Babylon from 1067 BC to 1046 BC . Copied from an original in the Pushkin Museum, Moscow. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture usurped by an Elamite king. 12th cent. BC from Suse. Inv AO 30043, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture usurped by an Elamite king. 12th cent. BC from Suse. Inv AO 30043, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture reporting the spoils of war, 12th cent.BC. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Babylonian Hammurabi stone relief sculpture. Hammurabi was the sixth Amorite king of Babylon from 1792 BC to 1750 BC . Hammurabi (standing), depicted as receiving his royal insignia from Shamash. Hammurabi holds his hands over his mouth as a sign of prayer. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture usurped by an Elamite king. 12th cent. BC from Suse. Inv AO 30043, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Babylonian Hammurabi stone relief sculpture. Hammurabi was the sixth Amorite king of Babylon from 1792 BC to 1750 BC . Hammurabi (standing), depicted as receiving his royal insignia from Shamash. Hammurabi holds his hands over his mouth as a sign of prayer. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, from the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture usurped by an Elamite king. 12th cent. BC from Suse. Inv AO 30043, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, from the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Babylonian stone relief sculpture. announcing a land deed of Adad-apla-iddina, 4th Dynasty king of Babylon from 1067 BC to 1046 BC . Copied from an original in the Pushkin Museum, Moscow. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, from the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Babylonian Hammurabi stone relief sculpture. Hammurabi was the sixth Amorite king of Babylon from 1792 BC to 1750 BC . Hammurabi (standing), depicted as receiving his royal insignia from Shamash. Hammurabi holds his hands over his mouth as a sign of prayer. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture usurped by an Elamite king. 12th cent. BC from Suse. Inv AO 30043, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture reporting the spoils of war, 12th cent.BC. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Roman Fresco of an exotic bird from  The Large Columbarium in Villa Doria Panphilj, Rome. A columbarium is usually a type of tomb with walls lined by niches that hold urns containing the ashes of the dead.  Large columbaria were built in Rome between the end of the Republican Era and the Flavio Principality (second half of the first century AD).  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations from Villas of Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a black background.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations from Villas of Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations from Villas of Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a white background.
  • Third century AD Roman Opus Sectile mosaic depicting a head from Santa Prisca, a titular church, on the Aventine Hill, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a white background.
  • Third century AD Roman Opus Sectile mosaic depicting a head from Santa Prisca, a titular church, on the Aventine Hill, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a black background.
  • 4th Century AD Roman Opus Sectile Mosaic depicting nymphs from the basilica de Giunio Basso .  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a black background.
  • Fresco of Venus sitting restored as Roma  known as the “Dea Barberini” (“Barberini goddess”), dating from the first quarter of the fourth century. A.D, excavated near to Baptistery of St. John Lateran , Rome Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a white background.
  • Fresco of Venus sitting restored as Roma  known as the “Dea Barberini” (“Barberini goddess”), dating from the first quarter of the fourth century. A.D, excavated near to Baptistery of St. John Lateran , Rome Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.
  • Roman Frescoes of the The Large Columbarium in Villa Doria Panphilj, Rome. A columbarium is usually a type of tomb with walls lined by niches that hold urns containing the ashes of the dead.  Large columbaria were built in Rome between the end of the Republican Era and the Flavio Principality (second half of the first century AD).  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a black background.
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   Against a white background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a white background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a black background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a white background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a black background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Gothic altarpiece of Madonna and Child and the Saints, by Rossello di Jacopo Franchi, from Florence, 1st quarter of 15th century.  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC  15932.
  • Gothic decorative painted beam panels with lions and a carved syalise tree, Tempera on wood. National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain
  • Gothic altarpiece of Madonna Of Humility With The Eternal Father In Glory, by Cenni di Francesco di Ser Cenni of Florence, circa 1375-80, tempera and gold leaf on wood. The Madonna and Child are depicted with the 12 apostles. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC  212805. Against a grey art background.
  • Gothic wood relief sculpture of the crwoning of of the Virgin Mary in the central European sgchiool style, end of 15th Century.  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC  5270. Against a grey art background.
  • Gothic Catalan altarpiece of Saint Peter enthroned, by Roderic d'Orsona of Valencia, circa 1475, tempera and gold leaf on wood.  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC 15816. Against a white background.
  • Gothic altarpiece of Madonna and Child by Niccolo di Tommaso, circa 1362-1367, tempera and gold leaf on wood.  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC  212809.
  • Gothic alabaster statue of Saint Anne and the Virgin Mary as a child from the Nottingham School England, 15th Century, from the cemetery of the vall de Bertizana, Nivarra.  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC  4353. Against a white background.
  • Gothic alabaster statue of Saint Anne and the Virgin Mary as a child from the Nottingham School England, 15th Century, from the cemetery of the vall de Bertizana, Nivarra.  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC  4353.
  • Gothic wooden statue of Sant Joan Evangelista (John the Evangelist) from Gremany, circa 1500, tempera and gold leaf on wood.  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC  64114.
  • Gothic embossed Brass on wood box, circa 1370-1450, possibly made in Barcelona, Catalunya. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC 5361.
  • Gothic Altarpiece of Madonna and Child by Francesc d'Orsona of Valencia, circa 1500-1505, tempera and gold leaf on wood, from the monastery of Sant Jeroni de Cotalba, Valencia.  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC  44357.
  • Gothic Altarpiece of the Annunciation by Archangel Gabriel , circa 1450, tempera and gold leaf on for wood.  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC   114748.
  • Gothic Panel from the tomb of the Knight Sancho Sanchez Carillo . Polychrome and gold leaf on wood by the Circle of Gil de Siloe around 1500, probably from Castella. Inv MNAC 64028. National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain
  • Satyr caressing Hermaphrodite, a Roman erotic fresco painting from Pompeii, 50-79 AD , from the tablium of the Casa di Epidio Sabino, inv no 27875 ,Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of prisoners from the campaign of Elam. From the palace of Ashurnasirpal II  room VI/T1, Nineveh, circa 645 BC. inv 19908  Louvre Museum , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of a Genie blessing. From the palace of Assurnasirpal II, Nimrud, circa 865 BC. inv 19847  Louvre Museum , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of a the deportation of the Babylonians. From the palace of Ashurnasirpal II  , Niniveh, circa 645 BC. inv 19911  Louvre Museum , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of cedar of Lebanon being transported. From the northern courtyard,  Inv AO 19889 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of a Genie blessing. From the palace of Assurnasirpal II, Nimrud, circa 865 BC. inv 19847  Louvre Museum , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of soldiers carrying a war chariot . Facade L. Inv AO 19884 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of a Royal servant. From the palace of Teglat-phalasar II, Nimrud, third quarter of the 8th century BC. inv 19852  Louvre Museum , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of two servants. Facade L. Inv AO 19879 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Stone statue of a winged bull. Reproduction from the facade of the throne room,  Inv AO 30043 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel fragment of a Dignitary. Inv AO 1432 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Stone statue of a Hero holding a lion. From facade M of the palace courtyard ,  Inv AO 19861 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of a man. From the facade of the throne room,  Inv AO 19917 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of a man. From the facade of the throne room,  Inv AO 19917 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Stone statue of a Hero holding a lion. From facade M of the palace courtyard ,  Inv AO 19861 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of two functionaries. Room 811. Inv AO 19876 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of two servants. Facade L. Inv AO 19879 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  fresco from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum
  • Painted marble bust of Ferdinand of Aragon, King of Naples (1423-1494) from the “Porta Salvatore” Sulmona, Italy. Variously  attributed to Pietro do Milano (around 1435-1473) Francesco Laurana (circa 1430-1502) and Domenico Gagini (quote from 1448-492).  Inv RF 745, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled box with scenes of the Massacre of the Innocents, last quarter of the 12th century from Limoges, enamel on gold. Monflanquin, Lot-en-Gironne. AD. Inv OA 10406, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted plaster statue of Saint Mary Magdalene, circa 1515-1520, suspended from the vault of the church of St. Mary Magdalene Dominican convent of Augsburg. Inspired by an engraving of Albrecht Durer which depicted Mary Magdalene nude. Inv RF 1338,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Wooden Gothic sculpture of the Virgin and Child attributeed to Martin Hoffman from the city of Basle, 1507, Switzerland. From the Commandry of Isenheim, Haut Rhin. This sculpture is probably the "big and ancient wooden statue of the Virgin” cited in 1793 in the inventory of the property of the Commandry of Isenheim.  The vervatious deep folds in the Virgins dress, the laughing child Jesus  and the style of Mary were repeatedly imitated in Basel at the beginning of the sixteenth century. This masterpiece of the German late Gothic sculpture was executed in a Basel workshop and can be attributed to Martin Hoffman. Expressive and enigmatic, the style of this masterpiece is the heir of the sculpture schools of Stragbourg and Veit Stoss Franconian art.  Inv RF 1833 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Enamelled terracotta relief panel of the Virgin and Child with two cherubs a copy of the “Madonna de l’Impuuneta” by Luca della Robbia, Florence 1399-1482).  Inv Campana 32,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic ivory diptych with scenes from the Passion made in Paris in the second quarter of the 14th century.  inv 10006, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic reliquary of Saint Francis of Assisi made in Limoges around 1228, enamel on gold. inv 4083, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic reliquary of Saint Francis of Assisi made in Limoges around 1228, enamel on gold. inv 4083, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled crucifix, end of the 12th century from Limoges, enamel on gold. AD. Inv OA 7284, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval gilded manuscript cover depicting the Crucifixion. 11th century from the treasury of the Cathedral of Maastricht. AD.  <br />
This gilded with relief panel with inlaid stones was originally a manuscript cover. Since 1677, it contained the 'documents of the oath of the Dukes of Brabant'. The back of the panel is covered with precious fabrics. On the front, in the central part, is depicted a crucifixion the style of which is reminiscent of the works of the goldsmiths of the Emperor Henry II. On the borders are small icons and emblems including those of the Carolingians. The main interest of this work lies in the four enamelled on gold symbols of the evangelists in the four corners, two being 'Enforced’ on a background of gold, the others being painted.<br />
<br />
One of Latin inscriptions states that 'Beatrice  ordered the execution ( of this work) in honour of Almighty God and his saints“. It could be Beatrice wife of Hermann II of Swabia and daughter Emperor's sister-Conrad II or, more likely, Beatrice of Tuscany who in 1036 was wife of Boniface III, Marquis of Tuscany, and second wife of Geoffrey the Bearded, Duke of Lower Lorraine and Brabant.<br />
 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • A Gothic stone carving of St. Andrew Bishop bring tempted by the devil. Second half of the fourteenth century by Bartomeu de Robio.From the church of Santa Maria de Castello Farfanya (Noguera). Inv MNAC 122485. National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain
  • Limoges Gothic Christian thurible or incense burner, 13th century. Copper engraved with an application of Champlevé enamelling. Origin Unknown. Inv MNAC 4550. National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain
  • Limoges figure of Christ from a Gothic Crucifix, circa 1200-1220. Copper engraving embossing, laced with an application of Champlevé enamelling and glass beads. Origin Unknow. Inv MNAC 4100. National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain
  • Gothic chest decorated with the Slaughter of the Innocents from Limoges Circa 1210-1220. Engraved copper with inlaid enamel  enamel champlevé and glass on wooden core. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC 65529
  • Gothic painted wood panels with scenes of the Martyrdom of Saint Lucy<br />
Circa 1300. Tempera on wood. Date Circa 1300. Dimensions 66 x 25.8 x 2 cm. From the parish church of Santa Llúcia de Mur (Guàrdia de Noguera, Pallars Jussà). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 035703-CJT
  • Gothic wood statue of Virgin and Child by tan anontmous Catalan Artist. Carved alabaster with remains of polychrome and gold leaf. Date Second half of 14th century. Dimensions 117.5 x 38.6 x 28.4 cm.  Probably comes from Sanaüja (Segarra). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain inv no: 004359-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Virgin of the Angels by  Enrique de Estencop. Tempera, stucco reliefs and gold leaf on wood. 1391-1392. Dimensions 142.2 x 99 x 8 cm.  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 064025-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Virgin of the Angels by  Enrique de Estencop. Tempera, stucco reliefs and gold leaf on wood. 1391-1392. Dimensions 142.2 x 99 x 8 cm.  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 064025-000
  • Gothic painted Panel of the life of Saint Dominic, anonymous artist from Aragon. Tempera and varnished metal plate on wood. First quarter of 14th century. 134 x 193 x 8.3 cm. From the church of Sant Miquel de Tamarit de Llitera (Huesca). National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 015825-000
  • Gothic wood statue of Saint Lucy by the St Bertrand de Cominges Group of artists. Polychrome wood carving with varnished metal-plating.  National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 064013-000
  • Gothic wood statue of Bishop Saint by the St Bertrand de Cominges Group of artists. Polychrome wood carving with varnished metal-plating.  National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 064024-000
  • Painted plaster statue of Saint Mary Magdalene, circa 1515-1520, suspended from the vault of the church of St. Mary Magdalene Dominican convent of Augsburg. Inspired by an engraving of Albrecht Durer which depicted Mary Magdalene nude. Inv RF 1338,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Pottery glazed plaque depicting the Virgin and Child made in Faenza, Italy, around 1500. inv 3100, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone statue of a winged bull. Reproduction from the facade of the throne room,  Inv AO 30043 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Gothic decorative painted beam panels with doves, hares and a carved syalise tree, Tempera on wood. National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain
  • Gothic altar panel depicting St Michael weighing the souls at the Last Judgement. End of the 13th century, tempera on a spruce wooden panel  from  The Church of Sant Miguel de Soriguerola, Cerdanya, Huesca, Spain. Inv MNAC 43901. National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain
  • Painted Gothic panels from the Altarpiece of the Virgin of the Angels.<br />
From Left - San John the Baptist, Santa Mary Magdele, St. James the Less, St. Paul.Tempera and gold leaf on wood, circa 1385 by by Pere Serra  from the Cathedral of Tortosa (Tarragona). Inv MNAC 3950, 3948, 3949. National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain
  • Late 13th or 14th century Gothic Bas-relief depicting the miracle performed by St Michael at Mont St Michael. limestone with traces of polcrome from the Church of San Miguel de Canet lo Roig (Castello), by the Master of Sant Mateu. Inv MNAC 45846-45845. National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain
  • Limoges Gothic chest with scenes from the Crucifixtion, circa 1210-1220. Copper engraved with an application of Champlevé enamelling. Origin Unknown. Inv MNAC 4573. National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain
  • Gothic statue of the Virgin Mary and Child. Polychrome and gold leaf on alabaster. Date - Second half of the 14th century. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain inv no: 9874
  • Gothic wood statue of the Virgin Mary and Child. Polychrome wood carving with varnished metal-plating. Date - First quarter of the 13th century. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain inv no: 3924
  • Gothic painted Panel Virgin Suckling the Child by Llorenc Saragossa. Tempera, gold leaf and metal plate on wood. Last quarter of 14th century. Dimensions 196.7 x 148.4 x 9.5 cm.  It comes from Albarracín cathedral (Teruel).  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 005080-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Altarpiece of Saint Vincent by  Master of Estopanya. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Circa 1350-1370. 199 x 255 x 10 cm. Comes from Estopanyà (Baixa Ribagorça, Huesca).. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 003940-CJT
  • Gothic statue of the Virgin Mary and child by an anonymous Catalan artist. Carved alabaster with remains of polychrome and gold leaf. Circa 1330-1340. 112 x 42.5 x 22.7 cm. From the parish church of Navata (Alt Empordà).. National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 004356-000
  • Gothic statue of the Virgin Mary and child by an anonymous Catalan artist. Carved alabaster with remains of polychrome and gold leaf. Circa 1330-1340. 112 x 42.5 x 22.7 cm. From the parish church of Navata (Alt Empordà).. National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 004356-000
  • Altarpiece of the Virgin by JAUME SERRA Circa 1367-1381. Tempera, gold leaf and metal plate on wood (346.3 x 321 x 26 cm) MNAC - National Museum of Catalan art, Barcelona, Spain Inv No: 015916-CJT
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Vestibule of a Rome Villa, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
A large fresco covered the curving wall of the vestibule E 5 was positioned at the entrance of the house onto the street. Vitruvius claims that the vestibulum was a room which was not needed by common people, but which was essential in a house worthy of respect, because it served to welcome guests and the people who came to be received by the owners of the house. The frescoed decoration of this wall, which was entirely detached, shows a division into panels, architectural perspectives and pavilions among which are figures and decorative elements, above a band of skirting. Numerous panels have been detached from the corridor E 3 E 11 which connected all the areas of the house, but it has not been possible to reconstruct the sequence of the walls. Inside the frames, against a white background, different decorative elements are arranged, along with hanging female and male figures, hippogriffs and other fantastical animals, vases, garlands and vegetation.
  • Roman Fresco of a bird from  The Large Columbarium in Villa Doria Panphilj, Rome. A columbarium is usually a type of tomb with walls lined by niches that hold urns containing the ashes of the dead.  Large columbaria were built in Rome between the end of the Republican Era and the Flavio Principality (second half of the first century AD).  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Viridarium L  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
Rooms B and D, clearly bedrooms (cubicula), were symmetrically arranged and projected farther forward than the large room C (the triclinium). They opened onto a rectangular unroofed space that must have been a garden (viridarium). This was a genuine hortus conclusus (enclosed garden). The walls that surrounded the real garden were decorated with a painted garden, like an extension of the real one. The south wall was decorated with the three panels shown here: within dense vegetation there are huts made of reeds, jetting fountains, and a marble seat. The most complete example of this kind of room is the one from the Villa of Livia (on display on this floor of the museum), the prototype for the fashion that spread throughout the Roman world of painting gardens on interior walls and around real garden spaces.
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   Against an art background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a black background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a white background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Gothic Catalan altarpiece of the martydom of Sant Vicenc (Saint Vincent), by Jaume Huguet of Barcelona, circa 1455-1460, tempera and gold leaf on wood, from the church of San Vicenc de Sarria, Barcelona..  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC 15866.
  • Gothic altarpiece tableau of the Archangel Gabriel  by Joan Mates of Vlafranca de Penedes, circa 1410-1430, tempera and gold leaf on for wood from the church of Santa Maria de Penafel, Alt Penedes, Spain.  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC  214533.
  • Gothic altarpiece ofthe Nativity from the workshop of Taller de Pere Garcia de Benavarri, circa 1475, tempera and gold leaf on for wood, from the church of Nostra Senyora de Baldos de Montanyana, Osca.  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC   114750-1. Against a white background.
  • Gothic Catalan altarpiece depicting the Madonna of Mercy by Bonant Zaortiga, circa 1430-1440, tempera and gold leaf on wood, from the church of Mare de Dieu de Carrasca , Blancas, Terol, Spain. Against a black background. <br />
Bonnat Zaortiga was one of the most prominent representatives of the international Gothic. The Mother of God of Mercy  protects humans with her cape, symbolizing one of the most feared evils of the European Middle Ages, plague, often understood as a punishment for the sins of mankind. This was the central panel of the altarpiece of the church of the Mother of God. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC 3945.
  • Gothic wooden statue of Madonna and Child by Seguidor de Diego de Siloe of Burgos, circa 1530-1540, tempera and gold leaf on wood, from the church of San Miguel de Medina del Campo, Valladolid..  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC  131050. Against a grey art background.
  • Gothic fresco mural painting "THE CONQUEST OF MAJORCA" 1285-1290. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 071447-CJT. <br />
The mural paintings of the Conquest of Majorca come from the former ancestral home of the Caldes family in Carrer Montcada in Barcelona, a building later known as Palau Aguilar. Discovered and removed in 1961, these paintings are one of the most important examples of early or Linear Gothic Catalan painting. This magnificent example of painting on historical subject matter narrates the conquest of the island of Majorca by James I the Conqueror in 1229. Like a painted chronicle, the episodes follow the detailed narrative of Catalan medieval accounts such as King James I's 'Llibre dels Feits' and Bernat Desclot's 'Crònica'.
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of aa Assyrian Chariot. From the palace of Ashurnasirpal II  room VI/T1, Nineveh, third quarter of the 8th century BC. inv 19909  Louvre Museum , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of horses and soldiers from corridor 10. Facade L. Inv AO 19918 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of Saron II. Facade L. Inv AO 19873-4 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of a Genie with poppy seed heads next ro the tree of life.  Inv AO 19869 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel fragment of a Dignitary. Inv AO 1432 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Stone statue of a winged bull. Reproduction from the facade of the throne room,  Inv AO 30043 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of a Hero holding a lion. From the facade of the throne room,  Inv AO 19862 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic fresco depicting Pan and Hermaphrodite, Pompeii (VI, 9, 6,) Casa die Dioscuri, inv 27700, 1-50 AD, Naples Archaological Museum, Italy
  • Enamelled terracotta relief panel of Saint George sleighing the Dragon. Made in Florence around 11520. Inv RF 3096, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled box depicting the entombment of a Saint, beginning of the 13th century from Limoges, enamel on gold. AD. Inv OA 949, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted Gothic gilded wooden statue altarpiece of Saint Catherine, circa 1520-1525 by Niklaus Weckmann from Ulm, Germany. The young Christian martyr is represented with his usual attributes, crown, book, wheel, sword, which make reference to her legendary life and her martyrdom. The bas-relief of Saint Catherine was originally part of an altarpiece. The treatment  and refined painted facial highlights executed the prettiness of the saint. The style is typical of  Niklaus Weckmann, one great masters of late Gothic Swabian art . Inv RF 2207.6,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic ivory statuette of the Virgin and Child known as “a La Supplique” (supplication) made in Paris oat the beginning of the the 15th century.  inv 2745, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic ivory statuette of the Virgin and Child with traces of polychrome, third quarter of 13th century before 1279 made in Paris. From the treasury of the Saint Chapelle, Paris. inv 67, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Gothic panel depicting scenes from the Life of St Nicholas. End of the 13th century, fresco transferred to canvas from a mural on the north wall of  The Church of San Fructuoso, Nicholas and John the Evangelist, Huesca, Spain. Inv MNAC 45796. National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain
  • Gothic painted Panel Altarpiece of Saint Stephen by  Jaume Serra. Tempera, gold leaf and metal plate on wood. Circa 1385. Dimesions 185.7 x 186.5 x 11 cm. From the monastery of Santa Maria de Gualter (Noguera).. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 003947-CJT
  • Gothic painted Panel Altarpiece of the Annunciation and Three Kings of the Epiphany by the Circle of Ferrer and Arnau Bassa. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Circa 1347-1360. 282.9 x 151 x 11 cm. The origin of this panel has traditionally been associated with the collegiate church of Sant Vicenç de Cardona (Bages). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 015855-000
  • Gothic wood statue of the Head of Christ by  Jaume Cascalls. Carved alabaster with polychrome and gilt remains.  This head must have belonged to a Recumbent Christ which could have formed part of a sculptural group of the Holy Sepulchre. It probably came from the chapel of Corpus Christi of the convent of Sant Agustí Vell, Barcelona.<br />
Jaume Cascalls is one of the most important sculptors of the fourteenth century in Catalonia. This is borne out by his involvement over almost thirty years with the project of the royal pantheon in Poblet for King Peter the Ceremonious and with other large undertakings of the time. Today, on stylistic grounds, he is credited with this 'Head of Christ', which must have formed part of a sculptural group of the Holy Sepulchre, presumably from the church of the convent of Sant Agustí Vell in Barcelona. The break in the neck suggests it belonged to a full-length recumbent Christ, like the one kept at Sant Feliu in Girona and also attributed to Cascalls. National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 034879-000
  • Gothic statue of the Virgin Mary and child by an anonymous Catalan artist. Carved alabaster with remains of polychrome and gold leaf. Circa 1330-1340. 112 x 42.5 x 22.7 cm. From the parish church of Navata (Alt Empordà).. National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 004356-000
  • Gothic painted Panel of the life of Saint Dominic, anonymous artist from Aragon. Tempera and varnished metal plate on wood. First quarter of 14th century. 134 x 193 x 8.3 cm. From the church of Sant Miquel de Tamarit de Llitera (Huesca). National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 015825-000

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