• Leaning Tower of Pisa - Pizza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Pizza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Pizza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Pizza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Pizza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Pizza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal and Leaning Tower - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal and Leaning Tower - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • Catherderal and Leaning Tower - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal and Leaning Tower - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Pizza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • Marble Releif Sculptures from the east frieze around the Parthenon Block IV 24-27. From the Parthenon of the Acropolis Athens. A British Museum Exhibit known as The Elgin Marbles. Far Richt Ares sits holding his knee  to his left Demeter is leaning on one wrist, a sign of mouring, grieving for her daughter Persaphone who had been abducted by the gods of the underworld.
  • Bas relief feeze above the door of the Baptistry of Pisa Duomo, Italy
  • Marble Releif Sculptures from the east frieze around the Parthenon Block IV 20-27. From the Parthenon of the Acropolis Athens. A British Museum Exhibit known as The Elgin Marbles. Far Richt Ares sits holding his knee  to his left Demeter is leaning on one wrist, a sign of mouring, grieving for her daughter Persaphone who had been abducted by the gods of the underworld.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel1 (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Second From left panel 2  -  King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Panel 3 - This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.<br />
 <br />
Panel 4 - The queen carries her youngest son. The hieroglyphs located above read; "and this is Tuwarsais; the prince desired by the ruler, whose exclusiveness has been exposed". While the queen carries her son in her lap, she holds the rope of the colt coming behind with her other hand. The muscles of the colt are schematic. <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel1 (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Second From left panel 2  -  King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Panel 3 - This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.<br />
 <br />
Panel 4 - The queen carries her youngest son. The hieroglyphs located above read; "and this is Tuwarsais; the prince desired by the ruler, whose exclusiveness has been exposed". While the queen carries her son in her lap, she holds the rope of the colt coming behind with her other hand. The muscles of the colt are schematic. <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel1 (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Second From left panel 2  -  King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Panel 3 - This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.<br />
 <br />
Panel 4 - The queen carries her youngest son. The hieroglyphs located above read; "and this is Tuwarsais; the prince desired by the ruler, whose exclusiveness has been exposed". While the queen carries her son in her lap, she holds the rope of the colt coming behind with her other hand. The muscles of the colt are schematic. <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel1 (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Second From left panel 2  -  King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Panel 3 - This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.<br />
 <br />
Panel 4 - The queen carries her youngest son. The hieroglyphs located above read; "and this is Tuwarsais; the prince desired by the ruler, whose exclusiveness has been exposed". While the queen carries her son in her lap, she holds the rope of the colt coming behind with her other hand. The muscles of the colt are schematic. <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Roma and Ge (Earth),  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a white background. <br />
<br />
The goddess Roma holds a spear and wears a crown in the form of a city wall. Earth reclines half naked leaning on a pile of fruit. She holds a cornucopia full of more fruit. A baby child (now damaged) climbs up the horn she holds. The relief represents Earths fertility and abundance overseen by Rome.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Roma and Ge (Earth),  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background. <br />
<br />
The goddess Roma holds a spear and wears a crown in the form of a city wall. Earth reclines half naked leaning on a pile of fruit. She holds a cornucopia full of more fruit. A baby child (now damaged) climbs up the horn she holds. The relief represents Earths fertility and abundance overseen by Rome.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Roma and Ge (Earth),  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background. <br />
<br />
The goddess Roma holds a spear and wears a crown in the form of a city wall. Earth reclines half naked leaning on a pile of fruit. She holds a cornucopia full of more fruit. A baby child (now damaged) climbs up the horn she holds. The relief represents Earths fertility and abundance overseen by Rome.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.  <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Picture and image  of the Realistic young grieving girl stone funary monument sculpture  commissioned by Enrico Amerigo for his sisters memory. beside the pedestal on which the sculptor set the deceased’s bust he placed, on the left, the figure of an old blind man, kneeling down and leaning on a stick; on the right he placed the figure of a young orphan girl, recognizable as such by her kindergarten uniform, portrayed in the act of making the sign of the cross. This work belongs to the Realism, a trend which was typical during the 1880s and 1890s, according to which the orphans, the poor, the sick and all those who benefited from somebody’s generosity had to be portrayed in a concrete fashion. Sculptor G Moreno 1890. Section A, no 53, The Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image  of the Realistic young grieving girl stone funary monument sculpture  commissioned by Enrico Amerigo for his sisters memory. beside the pedestal on which the sculptor set the deceased’s bust he placed, on the left, the figure of an old blind man, kneeling down and leaning on a stick; on the right he placed the figure of a young orphan girl, recognizable as such by her kindergarten uniform, portrayed in the act of making the sign of the cross. This work belongs to the Realism, a trend which was typical during the 1880s and 1890s, according to which the orphans, the poor, the sick and all those who benefited from somebody’s generosity had to be portrayed in a concrete fashion. Sculptor G Moreno 1890. Section A, no 53, The Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image  of the Realistic young grieving girl stone funary monument sculpture  commissioned by Enrico Amerigo for his sisters memory. beside the pedestal on which the sculptor set the deceased’s bust he placed, on the left, the figure of an old blind man, kneeling down and leaning on a stick; on the right he placed the figure of a young orphan girl, recognizable as such by her kindergarten uniform, portrayed in the act of making the sign of the cross. This work belongs to the Realism, a trend which was typical during the 1880s and 1890s, according to which the orphans, the poor, the sick and all those who benefited from somebody’s generosity had to be portrayed in a concrete fashion. Sculptor G Moreno 1890. The Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image  of the Realistic young grieving girl stone funary monument sculpture  commissioned by Enrico Amerigo for his sisters memory. beside the pedestal on which the sculptor set the deceased’s bust he placed, on the left, the figure of an old blind man, kneeling down and leaning on a stick; on the right he placed the figure of a young orphan girl, recognizable as such by her kindergarten uniform, portrayed in the act of making the sign of the cross. This work belongs to the Realism, a trend which was typical during the 1880s and 1890s, according to which the orphans, the poor, the sick and all those who benefited from somebody’s generosity had to be portrayed in a concrete fashion. Sculptor G Moreno 1890. Section A, no 53, The Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the Realistic blind man stone funary monument sculpture commissioned by Enrico Amerigo for his sisters memory. beside the pedestal on which the sculptor set the deceased’s bust he placed, on the left, the figure of an old blind man, kneeling down and leaning on a stick; on the right he placed the figure of a young orphan girl, recognizable as such by her kindergarten uniform, portrayed in the act of making the sign of the cross. This work belongs to the Realism, a trend which was typical during the 1880s and 1890s, according to which the orphans, the poor, the sick and all those who benefited from somebody’s generosity had to be portrayed in a concrete fashion. Sculptor G Moreno 1890. Section A, no 53, The Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • North Porch, Left Portal (Incarnation Portal), Tympanum- Gifts of the Magi and Dream of the Magi c 1194-1230, from the Cathedral of Chartres, France. At left is the Adoration of the Magi (Matthew 2:1)..Two Magi (crowned) stand at left, holding jars. One has a beard and the other is clean-shaven. The third Magus (bearded) kneels, handing a round object to the Christ Child, who sits on Mary's lap in the middle of the composition. Above them is the star of Bethlehem between two angels holding scrolls..At right is the Dream of the Magi. (Matthew 2:12).Two of the Magi (bearded, still crowned) lie sleeping on a bed at the lower right. The third Magus (beardless) appears behind them, with his eyes closed and his head propped up in his hand. Above is an angel with a scroll, one of the pair of angels who flank the star of Bethlehem at the top of the tympanum..Surrounding the central scene is the Inner archivolt. It contains angels holding candlesticks standing on clouds. Below The Virgin Mary (veiled) lies on a bed that is parallel to the panel plane. She raises one hand. The Christ Child (in swaddling clothes) is in a manger above the bed. Above him are the heads of the ox and the ass. They are probably a reference to Old Testament verses thought to be prophecies of the coming of the Messiah. Isaiah 1:3 says, "The ox knows his owner and the ass his maker's crib." There is a similar verse in Habakkuk. The apocryphal Protevangelium of James mentions only the ass. The Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew also says that an ox and an ass worshiped the Christ Child in the manger..Above are angels leaning out of a cloud and holding a long scroll.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • Marble Releif Sculptures from the east frieze around the Parthenon Block IV 24-27. From the Parthenon of the Acropolis Athens. A British Museum Exhibit known as The Elgin Marbles. Far Richt Ares sits holding his knee  to his left Demeter is leaning on one wrist, a sign of mouring, grieving for her daughter Persaphone who had been abducted by the gods of the underworld.
  • Marble Releif Sculptures from the east frieze around the Parthenon Block IV 20-27. From the Parthenon of the Acropolis Athens. A British Museum Exhibit known as The Elgin Marbles. Far Richt Ares sits holding his knee  to his left Demeter is leaning on one wrist, a sign of mouring, grieving for her daughter Persaphone who had been abducted by the gods of the underworld.
  • Marble Releif Sculptures from the east frieze around the Parthenon Block IV 20-27. From the Parthenon of the Acropolis Athens. A British Museum Exhibit known as The Elgin Marbles. Far Richt Ares sits holding his knee  to his left Demeter is leaning on one wrist, a sign of mouring, grieving for her daughter Persaphone who had been abducted by the gods of the underworld.
  • Medieval Sculptures of The Madonna & Child above the door to the The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • Medieval Sculptures on the The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • Medieval Sculptures of The Madonna & Child above the door to the The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Roma and Ge (Earth),  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The goddess Roma holds a spear and wears a crown in the form of a city wall. Earth reclines half naked leaning on a pile of fruit. She holds a cornucopia full of more fruit. A baby child (now damaged) climbs up the horn she holds. The relief represents Earths fertility and abundance overseen by Rome.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Roma and Ge (Earth),  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background. <br />
<br />
The goddess Roma holds a spear and wears a crown in the form of a city wall. Earth reclines half naked leaning on a pile of fruit. She holds a cornucopia full of more fruit. A baby child (now damaged) climbs up the horn she holds. The relief represents Earths fertility and abundance overseen by Rome.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.  <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.  <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.  <br />
<br />
Against a gray background.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.  <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Picture and image  of the Realistic young grieving girl stone funary monument sculpture  commissioned by Enrico Amerigo for his sisters memory. beside the pedestal on which the sculptor set the deceased’s bust he placed, on the left, the figure of an old blind man, kneeling down and leaning on a stick; on the right he placed the figure of a young orphan girl, recognizable as such by her kindergarten uniform, portrayed in the act of making the sign of the cross. This work belongs to the Realism, a trend which was typical during the 1880s and 1890s, according to which the orphans, the poor, the sick and all those who benefited from somebody’s generosity had to be portrayed in a concrete fashion. Sculptor G Moreno 1890. Section A, no 53, The Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the Realistic blind man stone funary monument sculpture commissioned by Enrico Amerigo for his sisters memory. beside the pedestal on which the sculptor set the deceased’s bust he placed, on the left, the figure of an old blind man, kneeling down and leaning on a stick; on the right he placed the figure of a young orphan girl, recognizable as such by her kindergarten uniform, portrayed in the act of making the sign of the cross. This work belongs to the Realism, a trend which was typical during the 1880s and 1890s, according to which the orphans, the poor, the sick and all those who benefited from somebody’s generosity had to be portrayed in a concrete fashion. Sculptor G Moreno 1890. Section A, no 53, The Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Marble Releif Sculptures from the east frieze around the Parthenon Block IV 24-27. From the Parthenon of the Acropolis Athens. A British Museum Exhibit known as The Elgin Marbles. Far Richt Ares sits holding his knee  to his left Demeter is leaning on one wrist, a sign of mouring, grieving for her daughter Persaphone who had been abducted by the gods of the underworld.
  • Marble Releif Sculptures from the east frieze around the Parthenon Block IV 24-27. From the Parthenon of the Acropolis Athens. A British Museum Exhibit known as The Elgin Marbles. Far Richt Ares sits holding his knee  to his left Demeter is leaning on one wrist, a sign of mouring, grieving for her daughter Persaphone who had been abducted by the gods of the underworld.
  • Marble Releif Sculptures from the east frieze around the Parthenon Block IV 24-27. From the Parthenon of the Acropolis Athens. A British Museum Exhibit known as The Elgin Marbles. Far Richt Ares sits holding his knee  to his left Demeter is leaning on one wrist, a sign of mouring, grieving for her daughter Persaphone who had been abducted by the gods of the underworld.
  • Medieval Sculptures on the The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite. Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Left Panel - Sitting in a chair without a backrest, the head and the face of the figure are completely destroyed. She has a long veil on her head, a long dress hanging down to her ankles, and the shoes with the curved ends. The stool under her feet indicates that she is an important person. She drinks something from the vessel in her right hand and she keeps the handled goblet in her hand a little higher.  <br />
<br />
Right Panel - Three figures with short skirts have their right arms positioned ahead. They each carry a sceptre in their left hand, which they lean against their shoulder. <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite. Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Left Panel - Sitting in a chair without a backrest, the head and the face of the figure are completely destroyed. She has a long veil on her head, a long dress hanging down to her ankles, and the shoes with the curved ends. The stool under her feet indicates that she is an important person. She drinks something from the vessel in her right hand and she keeps the handled goblet in her hand a little higher.  <br />
<br />
Right Panel - Three figures with short skirts have their right arms positioned ahead. They each carry a sceptre in their left hand, which they lean against their shoulder. <br />
<br />
Against a brown gray background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite. Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Left Panel - Sitting in a chair without a backrest, the head and the face of the figure are completely destroyed. She has a long veil on her head, a long dress hanging down to her ankles, and the shoes with the curved ends. The stool under her feet indicates that she is an important person. She drinks something from the vessel in her right hand and she keeps the handled goblet in her hand a little higher.  <br />
<br />
Right Panel - Three figures with short skirts have their right arms positioned ahead. They each carry a sceptre in their left hand, which they lean against their shoulder. <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite. Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Left Panel - Sitting in a chair without a backrest, the head and the face of the figure are completely destroyed. She has a long veil on her head, a long dress hanging down to her ankles, and the shoes with the curved ends. The stool under her feet indicates that she is an important person. She drinks something from the vessel in her right hand and she keeps the handled goblet in her hand a little higher.  <br />
<br />
Right Panel - Three figures with short skirts have their right arms positioned ahead. They each carry a sceptre in their left hand, which they lean against their shoulder. <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite. Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Left Panel - Sitting in a chair without a backrest, the head and the face of the figure are completely destroyed. She has a long veil on her head, a long dress hanging down to her ankles, and the shoes with the curved ends. The stool under her feet indicates that she is an important person. She drinks something from the vessel in her right hand and she keeps the handled goblet in her hand a little higher.  <br />
<br />
Right Panel - Three figures with short skirts have their right arms positioned ahead. They each carry a sceptre in their left hand, which they lean against their shoulder. <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Right Panel - King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
<br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Statue of Venus Marina (Greek Goddess of love), 1st century Roma copy found near Florence. This high quality statue of Venus of Aphrodite This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. In this aviation there is evidence that Venus leaned on a pillar with a dolphin which was a pointer to her having been born in the sea. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Royal Hero with hunting dogs,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
A diademed youth stands with his horse and hunting dogs. At the left an oval shield (foreign) hangs from a leafless tree, against which leans a long thin club. The Royal hero in this and the relief to the left is probably a local founder such as Assyrian King Ninos, claimed as founder of their city by the Aphrodisians.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Royal Hero with hunting dogs,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
A diademed youth stands with his horse and hunting dogs. At the left an oval shield (foreign) hangs from a leafless tree, against which leans a long thin club. The Royal hero in this and the relief to the left is probably a local founder such as Assyrian King Ninos, claimed as founder of their city by the Aphrodisians.
  • RomanSebasteion relief  sculpture of Royal Hero with hunting dogs,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
A diademed youth stands with his horse and hunting dogs. At the left an oval shield (foreign) hangs from a leafless tree, against which leans a long thin club. The Royal hero in this and the relief to the left is probably a local founder such as Assyrian King Ninos, claimed as founder of their city by the Aphrodisians.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Royal Hero with hunting dogs,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
A diademed youth stands with his horse and hunting dogs. At the left an oval shield (foreign) hangs from a leafless tree, against which leans a long thin club. The Royal hero in this and the relief to the left is probably a local founder such as Assyrian King Ninos, claimed as founder of their city by the Aphrodisians.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Royal Hero with hunting dogs,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
A diademed youth stands with his horse and hunting dogs. At the left an oval shield (foreign) hangs from a leafless tree, against which leans a long thin club. The Royal hero in this and the relief to the left is probably a local founder such as Assyrian King Ninos, claimed as founder of their city by the Aphrodisians.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
<br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings. I held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
<br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings. I held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
<br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings. I held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Against a gray background.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
<br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings. I held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
<br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Right Panel - King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
<br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Right Panel - King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
<br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Right Panel - King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
<br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".<br />
<br />
Against a gray background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Right Panel - King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
<br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings. held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Statue of Venus Marina (Greek Goddess of love), 1st century Roma copy found near Florence. This high quality statue of Venus of Aphrodite This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. In this aviation there is evidence that Venus leaned on a pillar with a dolphin which was a pointer to her having been born in the sea. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Statue of Venus Marina (Greek Goddess of love), 1st century Roma copy found near Florence. This high quality statue of Venus of Aphrodite This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. In this aviation there is evidence that Venus leaned on a pillar with a dolphin which was a pointer to her having been born in the sea. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Statue of Venus Marina (Greek Goddess of love), 1st century Roma copy found near Florence. This high quality statue of Venus of Aphrodite This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. In this aviation there is evidence that Venus leaned on a pillar with a dolphin which was a pointer to her having been born in the sea. Altes Museum Berlin
  • The Duomo & Bapistry of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Bapistry of Pisa, Italy
  • "At The Circus" a series of fine art abstract black and white photos. Fine art photography by art photographer Paul Williams
  • The Duomo of Pisa, Italy
  • Bapistry of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo of Pisa, Italy
  • Bapistry of Pisa, Italy
  • Bapistry of Pisa, Italy
  • Bapistry of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo of Pisa, Italy

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