• Medieval enamelled box with scenes from the martyrdom of Saint Thomas Becket, end of the 12th beginning of the 13th century from Limoges, enamel on gold. AD. Inv OA 7745, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled box depicting the martyrdom of Saint Thomas Becket, 12th century from Limoges, enamel on gold. AD. Inv OA 11333, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled tabernacle depicting Christ in majesty, circa 1200 AD from Limoges, enamel on gold. AD. Inv OA 8984, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval relief panel depicting Christ, Enamel on gold from Limoges, circa 1220-1230. Inv OA 11935, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted wooden relief sculptured altarpiece of two Popes, a  Cardinal, a Bishop a cannon and 7 priests praying made in 1505 by Daniel Mauch from Ulm. Inv RF 2805,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval elephant ivory relief panel depicting the Crucifixtion. From southern Germany or north of Italy, end of 10th or 11th cent. AD. Inv. OA 12231, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled box with scenes of the Massacre of the Innocents, last quarter of the 12th century from Limoges, enamel on gold. Monflanquin, Lot-en-Gironne. AD. Inv OA 10406, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval case known as “of Saint Louis”,  made in Limoges around 1236. Given by Philip the Fair to the Abbey of Notre Dame du Lis with relics of Saint Louis inside., Paris. inv 253, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled box depicting angels, circa12th century from Limoges, enamel on gold. AD.  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled box depicting the entombment of a Saint, beginning of the 13th century from Limoges, enamel on gold. AD. Inv OA 949, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic reliquary of Saint Francis of Assisi made in Limoges around 1228, enamel on gold. inv 4083, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled crosier with a lion and serpent, circa 12th century from Limoges, enamel on gold.  AD. Inv OA 7287, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled crosier with palm leaf flower, beginning of the 13th century from Limoges, enamel on gold. Nieul-sur-L’Autise. AD. Inv OA 8105, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled crucifix, end of the 12th century from Limoges, enamel on gold. AD. Inv OA 7284, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled crucifix, circa end of 12th century from Limoges, enamel on gold. AD. Inv OA 2956, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled panel depicting the Crucifixion, end of 12th cent from Limoges, enamel on gold. AD. Inv OA 7285, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted oak relief of three soldiers and two men in a rocky landscape below the walls of Jerusalem, from Antwerp circa 1510-1515. This is a panel from the Passion.  Inv RF  297,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted walnut sculpture of the decent from the Cross, circa 1470-1490 possibly from Antwerp or the Brabant region of Belgium.  Inv RF 4696,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted Gothic gilded wooden statue altarpiece of Saint Catherine, circa 1520-1525 by Niklaus Weckmann from Ulm, Germany. The young Christian martyr is represented with his usual attributes, crown, book, wheel, sword, which make reference to her legendary life and her martyrdom. The bas-relief of Saint Catherine was originally part of an altarpiece. The treatment  and refined painted facial highlights executed the prettiness of the saint. The style is typical of  Niklaus Weckmann, one great masters of late Gothic Swabian art . Inv RF 2207.6,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic reliquary of Saint Martin probably made in Avignon in the second quarter of the 14th century. From the church of Soudeilles, Correze, France.  inv 6459, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval ivory figure of Christ at the pillar made in Paris around 1300-1320.  inv 12380, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval elephant ivory plaque with traces of paint made in Italy in the 13th or start of the 14th century.  The crucifixion is a rare example of a Gothic piece being inspired by 11th century Romanesque works.  inv 7268, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval ivory plaque depicting the Crucifixion and the saints at the tomb, end of 11th cent from Salerne or Amalfi. AD. Inv OA 4085, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval ivory Triptych relief panel depicting the Ascension, end of 11th cent. AD. Inv OA 6340, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Bouquetin goats horn ivory crosier with traces of paint, circa 12th century from the south of Italy. Inv OA 11150, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval gilded manuscript cover depicting the Crucifixion. 11th century from the treasury of the Cathedral of Maastricht. AD.  <br />
This gilded with relief panel with inlaid stones was originally a manuscript cover. Since 1677, it contained the 'documents of the oath of the Dukes of Brabant'. The back of the panel is covered with precious fabrics. On the front, in the central part, is depicted a crucifixion the style of which is reminiscent of the works of the goldsmiths of the Emperor Henry II. On the borders are small icons and emblems including those of the Carolingians. The main interest of this work lies in the four enamelled on gold symbols of the evangelists in the four corners, two being 'Enforced’ on a background of gold, the others being painted.<br />
<br />
One of Latin inscriptions states that 'Beatrice  ordered the execution ( of this work) in honour of Almighty God and his saints“. It could be Beatrice wife of Hermann II of Swabia and daughter Emperor's sister-Conrad II or, more likely, Beatrice of Tuscany who in 1036 was wife of Boniface III, Marquis of Tuscany, and second wife of Geoffrey the Bearded, Duke of Lower Lorraine and Brabant.<br />
 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval ivory relief panel depicting the arrest of Christ.  From the workshop of Charles-le-Chauve circa 870 AD.. Inv. OA 9526, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval ivory comb with a central relief panel depicting David defeating a Lion. Third quarter of the 9th cent. AD from Metz. Inv. OA 354, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval ivory relief panel from a diptych depicting a triumphant Byzantine Roman Emperor, probably Justinian. From Constantinople, 6th century. Inv. OA 9063, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Christian relief Icon depicting scenes from the Nativity, A central ivory panel surrounded by beaten silver border. From Constantinople, 11th or 12th century. Inv. OA 11399, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Christian ivory diptych depicting the Nativity, the crucifixion and the Profits. Thirteenth century probably from Byzantine Roman Constantinople, present day Istanbul. Inv. OA 12442, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted relief panel of the Annonciation of the Virgin, made at the start of the 16th century possibly in the Tyrol, Austria.  Inv 2352 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Enamelled terracotta relief panel of Saint George sleighing the Dragon. Made in Florence around 1520. Inv RF 3096, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted wood sculpture of Saint Roch, circa 1510-1515  from Carinthie, Austria. Inv RF  4514,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted plaster statue of Saint Mary Magdalene, circa 1515-1520, suspended from the vault of the church of St. Mary Magdalene Dominican convent of Augsburg. Inspired by an engraving of Albrecht Durer which depicted Mary Magdalene nude. Inv RF 1338,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted plaster statue of Saint Mary Magdalene, circa 1515-1520, suspended from the vault of the church of St. Mary Magdalene Dominican convent of Augsburg. Inspired by an engraving of Albrecht Durer which depicted Mary Magdalene nude. Inv RF 1338,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted plaster statue of Saint Mary Magdalene, circa 1515-1520, suspended from the vault of the church of St. Mary Magdalene Dominican convent of Augsburg. Inspired by an engraving of Albrecht Durer which depicted Mary Magdalene nude. Inv RF 1338,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted wooden relief sculptured altarpiece of two Popes, a  Cardinal, a Bishop a cannon and 7 priests praying made in 1505 by Daniel Mauch from Ulm. Inv RF 2805,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Wooden Gothic sculpture of the Virgin and Child attributeed to Martin Hoffman from the city of Basle, 1507, Switzerland. From the Commandry of Isenheim, Haut Rhin. This sculpture is probably the "big and ancient wooden statue of the Virgin” cited in 1793 in the inventory of the property of the Commandry of Isenheim.  The vervatious deep folds in the Virgins dress, the laughing child Jesus  and the style of Mary were repeatedly imitated in Basel at the beginning of the sixteenth century. This masterpiece of the German late Gothic sculpture was executed in a Basel workshop and can be attributed to Martin Hoffman. Expressive and enigmatic, the style of this masterpiece is the heir of the sculpture schools of Stragbourg and Veit Stoss Franconian art.  Inv RF 1833 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Enamelled terracotta relief panel of the Virgin and Child with Cherubs by Andrea  della Robbia, Florence circa 1435-1525.  Inv  Campana 32,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Enamelled terracotta relief panel of the Virgin’s adoration of the Child in the presence of the infant Jean the Baptist by Andrea and Giovanni della Robbia, Florence circa 1500.  Inv LP 3410,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Enamelled plaque of Louis 12th known as the Sorrowful Virgin made in Limoge around 1500. inv 11170, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval ivory figure of Christ at the pillar made in Paris around 1300-1320.  inv 12380, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval elephant ivory plaque with traces of paint made in Italy in the 13th or start of the 14th century.  The crucifixion is a rare example of a Gothic piece being inspired by 11th century Romanesque works.  inv 7268, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval ivory plaque depicting the Crucifixion and the saints at the tomb, end of 11th cent from Salerne or Amalfi. AD. Inv OA 4085, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval gilded manuscript cover depicting the Crucifixion. 11th century from the treasury of the Cathedral of Maastricht. AD.  <br />
This gilded with relief panel with inlaid stones was originally a manuscript cover. Since 1677, it contained the 'documents of the oath of the Dukes of Brabant'. The back of the panel is covered with precious fabrics. On the front, in the central part, is depicted a crucifixion the style of which is reminiscent of the works of the goldsmiths of the Emperor Henry II. On the borders are small icons and emblems including those of the Carolingians. The main interest of this work lies in the four enamelled on gold symbols of the evangelists in the four corners, two being 'Enforced’ on a background of gold, the others being painted.<br />
<br />
One of Latin inscriptions states that 'Beatrice  ordered the execution ( of this work) in honour of Almighty God and his saints“. It could be Beatrice wife of Hermann II of Swabia and daughter Emperor's sister-Conrad II or, more likely, Beatrice of Tuscany who in 1036 was wife of Boniface III, Marquis of Tuscany, and second wife of Geoffrey the Bearded, Duke of Lower Lorraine and Brabant.<br />
 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Christian ivory diptych depicting the Nativity, the crucifixion and the Profits. Thirteenth century probably from Byzantine Roman Constantinople, present day Istanbul. Inv. OA 12442, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Painted Gothic wooden Fourteen Intercessors altarpiece made at the end of the 15th century in Franconia.  The panel depict 14 saints in total. Inv RF 2531,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Enamelled terracotta panel depicting Saint Anne, the Virgin Mary and Child with Saint Anthony made in the 2nd half of the 16th century by Santi Bugloni of Florence. This is a typical Tuscan theme of the period. Saint Anne was particularly venerated during the expulsion of the tyrant Gaultier de Brienne, Duke of Athens. .  Inv Camp 38,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted marble bust of Ferdinand of Aragon, King of Naples (1423-1494) from the “Porta Salvatore” Sulmona, Italy. Variously  attributed to Pietro do Milano (around 1435-1473) Francesco Laurana (circa 1430-1502) and Domenico Gagini (quote from 1448-492).  Inv RF 745, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic ivory diptych with scenes from the life of Christ and the Virgin made in Paris around 1370-1380.  inv 4089, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted Gothic wooden Fourteen Intercessors altarpiece made at the end of the 15th century in Franconia.  The panel depict 14 saints in total. Inv RF 2531,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted oak relief of three soldiers and two men in a rocky landscape below the walls of Jerusalem, from Antwerp circa 1510-1515. This is a panel from the Passion.  Inv RF  297,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted walnut sculpture of the decent from the Cross, circa 1470-1490 possibly from Antwerp or the Brabant region of Belgium.  Inv RF 4696,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted alabaster statue of the Virgin of the annunciation, made around 1495 by Tilman Riemenschneider of Heiligenstadt im Eichsfeld, Germany The statue would have originally bee accompanied by another of the  Gabriel and both would have formed part of an altarpiece. Inv RF 1384,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted Gothic gilded wooden statue altarpiece of Saint Catherine, circa 1520-1525 by Niklaus Weckmann from Ulm, Germany. The young Christian martyr is represented with his usual attributes, crown, book, wheel, sword, which make reference to her legendary life and her martyrdom. The bas-relief of Saint Catherine was originally part of an altarpiece. The treatment  and refined painted facial highlights executed the prettiness of the saint. The style is typical of  Niklaus Weckmann, one great masters of late Gothic Swabian art . Inv RF 2207.6,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted panels of the Martyrdom of Saint Catherine painted in 1524 by Hans Gieng of Fribourg.  From the church of Ependes near Fribourg, Switzerland. Inv RF 4721 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted panels of the Martyrdom of Saint Catherine painted in 1524 by Hans Gieng of Fribourg.  From the church of Ependes near Fribourg, Switzerland. Inv RF 4721 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Enamelled terracotta relief panel of the Ascension of Christ made around 1490 for the Cordoni chapel in the church of Saint Agostino in the Citta de Castello, Umbria, Italy by Andrea  della Robbia of Florence.  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Enamelled terracotta relief panel of the Virgin and Child with two cherubs a copy of the “Madonna de l’Impuuneta” by Luca della Robbia, Florence 1399-1482).  Inv Campana 32,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted stucco bust of a female possibly the Virgin of the Annonciation or Saint Catherine of Sienna. made in Florence around 1429- 1484 from Papiano, Palagio Fiorentino.  Inv  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Enamelled plaque depicting Christ in front of Pilate made in Limoges at the end of the 15th century, attributed to Master Pseudo-Monvaerni. inv 6309, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic ivory statuette of the Virgin and Child known as “a La Supplique” (supplication) made in Paris oat the beginning of the the 15th century.  inv 2745, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic ivory diptych with scenes from the Passion made in Paris in the second quarter of the 14th century.  inv 10006, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic reliquary of Saint Martin probably made in Avignon in the second quarter of the 14th century. From the church of Soudeilles, Correze, France.  inv 6459, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic ivory tabernacle depicting the Virgin and Child with scenes from the Annunciation, Nativity, the adoration of the Magi and the presentation at the Temple  made in Paris in second quarter of the 14th century and is a typical example of tabernacles made in Paris at that period.  inv 2587, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic ivory diptych depicting the Annunciation, Nativity, the adoration of the Magi and the crucifixion  made in Paris in second quarter of the 14th century.  inv 103, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic ivory diptych depicting the Virgin and child,  made in Paris in the first quarter of the 14th century.  inv 11097, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic ivory statuette of the Virgin and Child with traces of polychrome, third quarter of 13th century before 1279 made in Paris. From the treasury of the Saint Chapelle, Paris. inv 67, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic gold leaf funerary mask, end of 13th century made in Limoges. AD. From the Priory of Papillaye, Maine et Loire, the death mask came from the tomb of Herbert Lasnier who died in 1290. inv 6485, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval ivory Triptych relief panel depicting the Ascension, end of 11th cent. AD. Inv OA 6340, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Bouquetin goats horn ivory crosier with traces of paint, circa 12th century from the south of Italy. Inv OA 11150, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval elephant ivory relief panel depicting the Crucifixtion. From southern Germany or north of Italy, end of 10th or 11th cent. AD. Inv. OA 12231, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval ivory relief panel depicting the arrest of Christ.  From the workshop of Charles-le-Chauve circa 870 AD.. Inv. OA 9526, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Christian relief Icon depicting scenes from the Nativity, A central ivory panel surrounded by beaten silver border. From Constantinople, 11th or 12th century. Inv. OA 11399, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval ivory comb with a central relief panel depicting David defeating a Lion. Third quarter of the 9th cent. AD from Metz. Inv. OA 354, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval ivory relief panel from a diptych depicting a triumphant Byzantine Roman Emperor, probably Justinian. From Constantinople, 6th century. Inv. OA 9063, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Christian relief Icon depicting scenes from the Nativity, A central ivory panel surrounded by beaten silver border. From Constantinople, 11th or 12th century. Inv. OA 11399, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • 6th century BC Etruscan Sarcophagus known as The Sarcophagus of the Spouses, the in sculpted in clay by the sculptors of Caere, 520-510 BC, Louvre Museum, Paris.  Art Background. To license for non editorial Advertising usage contact The Louvre Paris
  • 6th century BC Etruscan Sarcophagus known as The Sarcophagus of the Spouses, the in sculpted in clay by the sculptors of Caere, 520-510 BC, Louvre Museum, Paris.   Grey art Background. To license for non editorial Advertising usage contact The Louvre Paris
  • 6th century BC Etruscan Sarcophagus known as The Sarcophagus of the Spouses, the in sculpted in clay by the sculptors of Caere, 520-510 BC, Louvre Museum, Paris.  Black background. To license for Advertising usage contact The Louvre Paris
  • Close up of 6th century BC Etruscan Sarcophagus known as The Sarcophagus of the Spouses, the in sculpted in clay by the sculptors of Caere, 520-510 BC, Louvre Museum, Paris. White Background. To license for non editorial Advertising usage contact The Louvre Paris
  • Close up of 6th century BC Etruscan Sarcophagus known as The Sarcophagus of the Spouses, the in sculpted in clay by the sculptors of Caere, 520-510 BC, Louvre Museum, Paris. To license for non editorial Advertising usage contact The Louvre Paris
  • 6th century BC Etruscan Sarcophagus known as The Sarcophagus of the Spouses, the in sculpted in clay by the sculptors of Caere, 520-510 BC, Louvre Museum, Paris.  Grey Background. To license for Advertising usage contact The Louvre Paris
  • Close up of 6th century BC Etruscan Sarcophagus known as The Sarcophagus of the Spouses, the in sculpted in clay by the sculptors of Caere, 520-510 BC,  Louvre Museum, Paris. To license for non editorial Advertising usage contact The Louvre Paris
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture reporting the spoils of war, 12th cent.BC. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture usurped by an Elamite king. 12th cent. BC from Suse. Inv AO 30043, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture reporting the spoils of war, 12th cent.BC. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture reporting the spoils of war, 12th cent.BC. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture usurped by an Elamite king. 12th cent. BC from Suse. Inv AO 30043, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture reporting the spoils of war, 12th cent.BC. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture usurped by an Elamite king. 12th cent. BC from Suse. Inv AO 30043, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture reporting the spoils of war, 12th cent.BC. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman mosaic of a Church with Towers, Eastern Mediterranean, 5th century AD. The church has three naves and is represented in a 'flattened Perspective’ as can be seen by the facade and along sides forming a straight continuous line. The mosaic shows the architecture of early Roman Chriatian Basilicas. Inv 3676, The Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of an Amazon on horseback fighting, From Daphne, a suburb of Antioch, Antakya, Turkey, 4th century AD. Marble blocks and glass paste cubes. The mosaic depicts the legendary woman warriors known as the Amazons, who fought with one breast showing, fighting a soldier with armour. inv 3463, The Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of the inside of a church, Eastern Mediterranean, 5th century AD. This abstract representation of a church choir shows two columns, a low lattice  divider and a pair of oriental designed curtains at the top. beyond is the inner sanctum of the church with a Mandorla surrounded by flames with a cross in it. In the foreground is a a hare and devouring a bunch of grapes next to Greek letter that translate to 'Christ rescues'. Inv 5093, The Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of a Hebrew, possibly from North Syria 5th-6th century AD J-C. dressed in Oriental clothing, that young man is identified by writing in Syriac has the right to his head: it tells of three Hebrews miraculously surviving after being thrown into a fire for refusing to worship the image of Nebuchadnezzar. This is biblical episode is from the Book Daniel (3 1-30), and is commonly illustrated in the East as in the West. Inv 3671, The Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of two Gazelles facing inwards either side of a vase, Eastern Mediterranean, the beginning of the 6th century AD. The mosaic design is typical of  church  floors in front of the choir. The choice of gazelles is rare though and indicates a local flavour to the content. Inv 3673, The Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of an Amazon on horseback fighting, From Daphne, a suburb of Antioch, Antakya, Turkey, 4th century AD. Marble blocks and glass paste cubes. The mosaic depicts the legendary woman warriors known as the Amazons, who fought with one breast showing, fighting a soldier with armour. inv 3463, The Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of a Phoenix, From Daphne, a suburb of Antioch, Antakya, Turkey, 6th century AD. Marble blocks and glass paste cubes. The phoenix is a mythical bird associated with the sun. A phoenix obtains new life by arising from the ashes of its predecessor. The phoenix was subsequently adopted as a symbol in Early Christianity.In the mosaic it is perched rock above a background of rose buds and is bordered by a pair of facing rams. inv 3342, restored in 1936 by the Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of a Phoenix, From Daphne, a suburb of Antioch, Antakya, Turkey, 6th century AD. Marble blocks and glass paste cubes. The phoenix is a mythical bird associated with the sun. A phoenix obtains new life by arising from the ashes of its predecessor. The phoenix was subsequently adopted as a symbol in Early Christianity.In the mosaic it is perched rock above a background of rose buds and is bordered by a pair of facing rams. inv 3342, restored in 1936 by the Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of an early Christian church floor from Qabr Hiram, Lebanon, 575 AD. Marble blocks and glass paste cubes. This mosaic was designed to follow the layout of the church which had three naves. It depicts God through images of his creation: rural activities, fruit, animals with representations of the months, seasons and winds. The inscription indicates that the basilica was dedicated to St. Christopher and was built in 575 AD.. Inv 32230-2236, Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of an early Christian church floor from Qabr Hiram, Lebanon, 575 AD. Marble blocks and glass paste cubes. This mosaic was designed to follow the layout of the church which had three naves. It depicts God through images of his creation: rural activities, fruit, animals with representations of the months, seasons and winds. The inscription indicates that the basilica was dedicated to St. Christopher and was built in 575 AD.. Inv 32230-2236, Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of an early Christian Basilica from the Eastern Mediterranean, late 5th century AD. Marble blocks, limestone, sandstone and terracotta. The church has three naves and is represented in a 'flattened Perspective’ as can be seen by the facade and along sides forming a straight continuous line. The side wall is deliberately open to make the interior visible . Inv 3677, Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of a Young boy playing with snakes, possibly an early Christian mosaic. Syria or Lebanon, 5th century AD. Cubes of marble and limestone. Dressed in a long tunic, the child playing with two snakes could be illustrating a passage from the Book of Isai (11.6 to 8). This fragmented mosaic panel once continued in upper part, as indicated by the animal hoofs, and to the right of the mosaic are remains of a Greek inscription. inv 5094. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Female Portrait (Antioch, Antakya, Turkey), 1st half of 3rd century AD. Marble cubes, limestone and glass. The mosaic bust of a female with a billowing sail that surrounds her head that it could represent the wind. The mosaic decorated the entrance of a dining room and was once flanked it with now lost representations of the marine deities Thalassa and Okeanosinv 3460, Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Birds around a  vase From Daphne, a suburb of Antioch, Antakya, Turkey, 1st half of 3rd century AD. Marble cubes, limestone and glass. A border of geometric perspective cubes surround a scene with one bird sitting on the vase of Daphne whilst the other surround it. The naturalistic skill of the Roman Antioch mosaic artists is so good that it is possible to tell the species of each bird. inv 3461, Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman Byzantine floor Mosaics of the early Christian Church of St. Christopher, Qabar Hiram, Lebanon, AD 575. Louvre Museum Paris inv 2230-2235
  • Statue of  Atalanta a 2nd century Roman sculpture restored in the 17th century. Atalanta  is a character in Greek mythology, a virgin huntress, unwilling to marry, and loved by the hero Meleager.. The Mazarin Collection  Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Relief sculpture called Les Trois Tyches, a Roman relief sculpture circa 160 AD found on the Appia Way, Rome, Italy. A Tyche was the deity of luck or fotune and brought prosperity to a city. She is the daughter of Aphrodite and Zeus or Hermes. From the Borghese Collection  Inv MR 873   (or Ma 590), The Louvre Mueum, Paris
  • A Roman statue of the Parthenon Athena, a Roman copy of the great statue from the Parthenon in Athens.  Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Juno known as La Providence, a 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Rome, Italy. Juno is an ancient Roman goddess, the protector and special counselor of the state. As the patron goddess of Rome and the Roman Empire, Juno was called Regina ("Queen") and, together with Jupiter and Minerva, was worshipped as a triad on the Capitol (Juno Capitolina) in Rome. The Royal Collection Inv No. MR 333 or Ma 485, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a male divinity known as Jupiter de Smyrne, a 2nd Roman statue from Smyrne, Izmir present day Turkey. The Royal Collection Inv No. MR 255 or Ma 13, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Bust of Rome - a 1st or 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in marble, from Italy. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 643 or Ma 1209, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Antinous Mondragone, A Roman marble bust from circa 130 AD. Antinous was the young Bithynian favoured by the emperor Hadrian who was deified after drowning under mysterious circumstances in the waters of the Nile circa 130AD. Thanks to the promotion of the cult Antinous portraits can be found throughout the Empire in the places most frequented by Hadrian. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 412 or Ma 1205, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Antinous Mondragone, A Roman marble bust from circa 130 AD. Antinous was the young Bithynian favoured by the emperor Hadrian who was deified after drowning under mysterious circumstances in the waters of the Nile circa 130AD. Thanks to the promotion of the cult Antinous portraits can be found throughout the Empire in the places most frequented by Hadrian. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 412 or Ma 1205, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue known as Antonius as Aristaeus. Antinous was the young Bithynian favoured by the emperor Hadrian who was deified after drowning under mysterious circumstances in the waters of the Nile circa 130AD. Thanks to the promotion of the cult Antinous portraits can be found throughout the Empire in the places most frequented by Hadrian. This statue was part of the collection of ancient sculptors bought in Rome by Cardinal Richelieu (1585-1642) for his chateau in Poitou. The favourite of the Emperor Hadrian (117-138 AD) Antonius  is depicted here as Aristaeus, a minor Greek God of fruit trees and bee keeping. The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 73 or Ma 5781, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Adonis - Tis antique statue was completely restored in the 16th century by Francois Du Quesnoy for the collection of Cardinal Mazarin. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 239, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Thetsis - a 2nd century AD Roman statue found in the city of Lavinia, Italy. Thetis (/ˈθɛtɪs/; Ancient Greek: Θέτις, [tʰétis]), is encountered in Greek mythology mostly as a sea nymph or known as the goddess of water, one of the fifty Nereids, daughters of the ancient sea god Nereus. he statue belonged to a set of ten divinities formerly presented in the portico hemicycle of the city. The Albani Collection Inv No. LL 19 (Usual No Ma 2244), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Antinous - a 2nd century Roman sculpture in marble from Italy. The statue is a montage of a more modern head of Antinous with an older body in the style of Hercules. Inv No. MR 74 (Usual No Ma 2243), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Anchyrrhoe Nymph - a 2nd century Roman sculpture from Iatly. The Anchyrrhoe Nymph is an allegory of Fortune and was desd in the gardens of the chateau d’Ecouen in the 17th century. The style is copied from a Hellanistic Greek original and also reprints the dance as a muse. Inv No. MR 310 (Usual No Ma 868), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Child and Goose - a 1st or 2nd century Roman sculpture from Villa des Quintilii on the Appia Way south of Rome, Italy. Three other similar versions of this Roman sculpture can be found in the Vatican, music and Geneva. The sculpture is attributed to Boethos who was a 2nd century sculptor.  The Braschi Collection, Inv No. MR168 (Usual No Ma 40), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Athletes head, Diadumene type - A Roman sculpture circa 150 AD found at the abbey of Vauluisant in Villeneuve-L’Archeveque, France.  Inv No. MND 1441 (Usual No Ma 3483), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Ares Borghese is a Roman marble statue of the imperial era, 1st or 2nd century AD. This statue possibly preserves some features of an original work in bronze, now lost, of the 5th century BC by Alcamenes, an Athenian sculptor, or the statue may not be a copy of Alcamenes's, but instead a Roman creation according to a classicising or Neo-Attic type. Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Diomedes - A 2nd or 3rd century AD Roman copy of a Greek classical sculpture from about 430-370 BC. This Roman statue represent Diomede, one of the Greek hero of the Trojan War. This statue belongs to a series of ancient replicas (Naples, Munich), which copy the original Greek statue from the school of Polykleitos, attributed to the sculptor Naucydes or Cresilas who worked in Athens to 440-430 BC. From the Cardinal Richelieu Collection  Inv MR 265   (or Ma 890), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Roman bust of Greek philosopher Aristolte. 1st - 2nd century AD from Italy made of Pentilic Marble from Athens Greece. Aristotle lived around 384-322 BC and became the tutor of Alexander The Great. This bust was copied from a lost Greek bronze original by Lysippe (370-300BC) , sculptor to Alexander The Great. Traces of the original paint can be seen on the beard. From the Borghese collection Inv Mr or Ma 80 ,  Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman marble head of Aphrodite (Venus)  known as the “Kaufmann head” once conserved in Berlin. Circa 150 BC found in Asia Minor.  Inv MND 2027 ( or Ma 3518) Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite- type known as the Venus of Arles. A Roman statue in marble of the 1st - 2nd century AD in marble from Rome. The statue is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) and is  probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae a lost bronze sculpture by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . From the Royal collection Inv MR 366 ( or Ma 437), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite- type known as the Venus of Arles. A Roman statue in marble of the 1st - 2nd century AD in marble from Rome. The statue is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) and is  probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae a lost bronze sculpture by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . From the Royal collection Inv MR 366 ( or Ma 437), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite- type known as the Venus of Arles. A Roman statue in marble of the 1st - 2nd century AD in marble from Rome. The statue is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) and is  probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae a lost bronze sculpture by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . From the Royal collection Inv MR 366 ( or Ma 437), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Pan removing a thorn from the foot of a satyr. 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Pan (Faunus to the Romans) , the Greek god of shepherds, is recognisable as a hybrid of half-man half-goat. This group, of which several Roman versions exist, dates from circa 50 BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 193 ( or Ma 320 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Bacchante or Ariadne, a Roman marble statue of circa 150 - 200 AD. The bunch of grapes wrapped in the folds of her garment suggest that the statue depicts either Bacchante or Ariadne both  companions of Dionysus. The statue belongs to a very limited series of replicas (Florence, Venice, Rome, Cyrene) reproducing a Greek original lost year circa 300 BC made by the school from Rhodes. The Borghese collection inv MR 102 ( or Ma 676), Louvre Museum Paris
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • Altar of the Twelve Gods a Roman relief sculpture. This curious object, perhaps a Zodiacal altar, has the signs of the zodiac and busts of the twelve gods identified by their attributes. From the Borghese Collection  Inv MR 959  (or Ma 666), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Altar of the Twelve Gods a Roman relief sculpture. This curious object, perhaps a Zodiacal altar, has the signs of the zodiac and busts of the twelve gods identified by their attributes. From the Borghese Collection  Inv MR 959  (or Ma 666), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Statue of  Atalanta a 2nd century Roman sculpture restored in the 17th century. Atalanta  is a character in Greek mythology, a virgin huntress, unwilling to marry, and loved by the hero Meleager.. The Mazarin Collection  Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Juno known as La Providence, a 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Rome, Italy. Juno is an ancient Roman goddess, the protector and special counselor of the state. As the patron goddess of Rome and the Roman Empire, Juno was called Regina ("Queen") and, together with Jupiter and Minerva, was worshipped as a triad on the Capitol (Juno Capitolina) in Rome. The Royal Collection Inv No. MR 333 or Ma 485, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a male divinity known as Jupiter de Smyrne, a 2nd Roman statue from Smyrne, Izmir present day Turkey. The Royal Collection Inv No. MR 255 or Ma 13, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Female statue known as the Muse de Louveciennes, a Roman statue of the 3rd century AD from Rome. The Royal Collection Inv No. MR 354 or Ma 170, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Bust of Rome - a 1st or 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in marble, from Italy. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 643 or Ma 1209, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Antinous Mondragone, A Roman marble bust from circa 130 AD. Antinous was the young Bithynian favoured by the emperor Hadrian who was deified after drowning under mysterious circumstances in the waters of the Nile circa 130AD. Thanks to the promotion of the cult Antinous portraits can be found throughout the Empire in the places most frequented by Hadrian. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 412 or Ma 1205, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue known as Antonius as Aristaeus. Antinous was the young Bithynian favoured by the emperor Hadrian who was deified after drowning under mysterious circumstances in the waters of the Nile circa 130AD. Thanks to the promotion of the cult Antinous portraits can be found throughout the Empire in the places most frequented by Hadrian. This statue was part of the collection of ancient sculptors bought in Rome by Cardinal Richelieu (1585-1642) for his chateau in Poitou. The favourite of the Emperor Hadrian (117-138 AD) Antonius  is depicted here as Aristaeus, a minor Greek God of fruit trees and bee keeping. The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 73 or Ma 5781, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Adonis - Tis antique statue was completely restored in the 16th century by Francois Du Quesnoy for the collection of Cardinal Mazarin. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 239, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Thetsis - a 2nd century AD Roman statue found in the city of Lavinia, Italy. Thetis (/ˈθɛtɪs/; Ancient Greek: Θέτις, [tʰétis]), is encountered in Greek mythology mostly as a sea nymph or known as the goddess of water, one of the fifty Nereids, daughters of the ancient sea god Nereus. he statue belonged to a set of ten divinities formerly presented in the portico hemicycle of the city. The Albani Collection Inv No. LL 19 (Usual No Ma 2244), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of the Emperor Titus - an end of the 1st century AD Roman statue probably from Rome. Titus was Emperor of the Romans fom 79 to 81 AD. The statue looks like it may have recieved some restoration especially around the eyes and the style of changes points to the sculptor Girardon in 1685. From the French Royal Collection  Inv MR 358   (or Ma 1067), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Child and Goose - a 1st or 2nd century Roman sculpture from Villa des Quintilii on the Appia Way south of Rome, Italy. Three other similar versions of this Roman sculpture can be found in the Vatican, music and Geneva. The sculpture is attributed to Boethos who was a 2nd century sculptor.  The Braschi Collection, Inv No. MR168 (Usual No Ma 40), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Athletes head, Diadumene type - A Roman sculpture circa 150 AD found at the abbey of Vauluisant in Villeneuve-L’Archeveque, France.  Inv No. MND 1441 (Usual No Ma 3483), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Ares Borghese is a Roman marble statue of the imperial era, 1st or 2nd century AD. This statue possibly preserves some features of an original work in bronze, now lost, of the 5th century BC by Alcamenes, an Athenian sculptor, or the statue may not be a copy of Alcamenes's, but instead a Roman creation according to a classicising or Neo-Attic type. Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Diomedes - A 2nd or 3rd century AD Roman copy of a Greek classical sculpture from about 430-370 BC. This Roman statue represent Diomede, one of the Greek hero of the Trojan War. This statue belongs to a series of ancient replicas (Naples, Munich), which copy the original Greek statue from the school of Polykleitos, attributed to the sculptor Naucydes or Cresilas who worked in Athens to 440-430 BC. From the Cardinal Richelieu Collection  Inv MR 265   (or Ma 890), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Roman bust of Greek philosopher Aristolte. 1st - 2nd century AD from Italy made of Pentilic Marble from Athens Greece. Aristotle lived around 384-322 BC and became the tutor of Alexander The Great. This bust was copied from a lost Greek bronze original by Lysippe (370-300BC) , sculptor to Alexander The Great. Traces of the original paint can be seen on the beard. From the Borghese collection Inv Mr or Ma 80 ,  Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • 2nd century Roman marble torso copy of the statue of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture.  Inv Ma 2184 Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman marble head of Aphrodite (Venus)  known as the “Kaufmann head” once conserved in Berlin. Circa 150 BC found in Asia Minor.  Inv MND 2027 ( or Ma 3518) Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite- type known as the Venus of Arles. A Roman statue in marble of the 1st - 2nd century AD in marble from Rome. The statue is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) and is  probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae a lost bronze sculpture by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . From the Royal collection Inv MR 366 ( or Ma 437), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Pan removing a thorn from the foot of a satyr. 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Pan (Faunus to the Romans) , the Greek god of shepherds, is recognisable as a hybrid of half-man half-goat. This group, of which several Roman versions exist, dates from circa 50 BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 193 ( or Ma 320 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Ariadne sleeping a 2nd century AD Marble Roman statue from Italy. The girl is lying asleep on a rock and is a variation of the famous Sleeping Ariadne of the Vatican museum whose composition is reversed. in Greek mythology Ariadne was the daughter of Minos, King of Crete  and his queen Pasiphaë, daughter of Helios . When Thesius was sent to Crete to be sacrificed to the Minateur Ariadne fell in love at first sight, and helped him by giving him a sword and a ball of thread, so that he could find his way out of the Minotaur's labyrinth. She eloped with Theseus after he achieved his goal, and in most accounts of the myth, Theseus abandoned Ariadne sleeping on Naxos, and Dionysus rediscovered and wedded her. This Roman  Sculpture was inspired  by a Greek original of the 2nd century AD. inv MR 311 ( or Ma 340 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.

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