• Column base Sphix sculpture support. Found in North Hall at the Castle of Sam'al - Zincirli. Basalt 8th century BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no 3017
  • Relief panels orthostat with representation by court officials, they served as a wall covering of palaces of Sam'al - Zincirli. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin,
  • Relief panels depicting a lion hunt found in the palace district in the ruins of Coba Höyük, also known as Sakçe Gözü or Sakçagözü, archaeological site in southeastern Anatolia, Turkey.  Warriors are fighting with the lion from a chariot and on foot wearing armour . Basalt to 750 BC, The Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no VA 971
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Lion sculptures from the city gate of  Sam'al - Zincirli. Neo Syro Hittite. Basalt 8th century BC. Pergamon Museum Berlin.
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Lion sculptures from the city gate of  Sam'al - Zincirli. Neo Syro Hittite. Basalt 8th century BC. Pergamon Museum Berlin.
  • Relief panels orthostat showing a man with a gazelle on the shoulders excavated from the Northern Hall at  Sam'al / Zincirli, Turkey. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no  VA3007
  • Relief panels orthostat showing a man with a gazelle on the shoulders excavated from the Northern Hall at  Sam'al / Zincirli, Turkey. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no  VA3007
  • Relief panels orthostat showing a man with a gazelle on the shoulders excavated from the Northern Hall at  Sam'al / Zincirli, Turkey. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no  VA3007
  • Column base Sphix sculpture support. Found in North Hall at the Castle of Sam'al - Zincirli. Basalt 8th century BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no 3017
  • Relief panels orthostat from Sam 'al /Zincirli. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • The Kilamuwa Stela a stele of King Kilamuwa, from the Kingdom of Sam'al. The stele is a 16-line text in Phoenician. King Kilamuwa is shown standing on the upper left and addressing four Canaanite god-insignias with his right arm and finger. His left hand is draped at his left side holding a wilted lotus flower, a symbol of a king's death. He is dressed in king's regalia with hat, and his figure stands at the beginning of the first nine lines of the text.. Basalt  9th-century BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.  The text reads "I am Kilamuwa, the son of King Haya'. King Gabar reigned over Ya'diya-(Sam'al) but achieved nothing.<br />
Then came Bamah, and he achieved nothing.<br />
My own father, Haya', did nothing with his reign.<br />
My brother, Sha'il, also did nothing.<br />
It was I, Kilamuwa...who managed to do what none of my ancestors had.<br />
My father's kingdom was beset by powerful, predatory kings, all holding out their hands, demanding to be fed.<br />
But I raged amongst them like a fire, burning their beards and consuming their outstretched hands.<br />
Only the Danunian kings overmastered me; I had to call on the King of Assyria to assist me...<br />
I, Kilamuwa, the son of Haya', ascended my father's throne.<br />
Under their previous kings, the [people] had howled like dogs.<br />
But I was a father, a mother and a brother to them.<br />
I gave gold, silver and cattle to men who had never so much as seen the face of a sheep before.<br />
Those who had never even seen linen all their lives I clothed in byssus-cloth from head to foot.<br />
I took the [people] by the hand and in their souls they looked to me just as the orphan looks to his mother."<br />
"Whoever of my sons comes after me and interferes with this inscription, may he be dishonoured among the people...<br />
And if anyone should damage this inscription,<br />
Let Gabar's god Ba'al-Samad destroy his head,<br />
And let Bamah's god Ba'al Hamon destroy his head..."<br />
Together with Reχub-ʾEl, the Lord of the Palace
  • Relief panels orthostat with representation by court officials, they served as a wall covering of palaces of Sam'al - Zincirli. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin,
  • Relief panels orthostat with representation by court officials, they served as a wall covering of palaces of Sam'al - Zincirli. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin,
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Relief panels orthostat with representation by court officials, they served as a wall covering of palaces at the castle of Sam'al - Zincirli. Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no VA2997, 2998, S6586
  • Relief panels orthostat with representation by court officials, they served as a wall covering of palaces at the castle of Sam'al - Zincirli. Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no VA2997, 2998, S6586
  • Relief panels orthostat with representation by court officials, they served as a wall covering of palaces at the castle of Sam'al - Zincirli. Pergamon Museum, Berlin,
  • Relief panels orthostat with representation by court officials, they served as a wall covering of palaces at the castle of Sam'al - Zincirli. Pergamon Museum, Berlin,
  • Relief panels orthostat with representation by court officials, they served as a wall covering of palaces at the castle of Sam'al - Zincirli. Pergamon Museum, Berlin,
  • Relief panels orthostat with representation by court officials, they served as a wall covering of palaces at the castle of Sam'al - Zincirli. Pergamon Museum, Berlin,
  • A Colossal Statue of the Weather God Hadad found near Gerdshin near Sam'al / Zincirli , Turkey. The lower part of the body of the statue has Aramaic text which starts " I am Panamuwa, the son of QRL, the king of Ja'udi, I have erected this statue of Hadad, at my eternal grave.  Originally the statue would have held lightening rods and an axe. On his round cap are bull horns known as the symbols of divinity. The weather God brought the rains which in the dry areas of Mesopotamia was all important. The inscription goes on to read " May the soul of Panamuwa eat with Hadad, May the soul of Panamuwa drink with Hadad". Basalt 775 BC, Pergamon Museum Berlin, inv no VA 2882.
  • Relief panels depicting a lion hunt found in the palace district in the ruins of Coba Hoyuk, also known as Sakçe Gözü or Sakcagozu, archaeological site in southeastern Anatolia, Turkey.  Warriors are fighting with the lion from a chariot and on foot. The soldiers in the chariot have armour as does the horse  The archer, probably the ruler, is under the protection of the gods, indicated by the winged sun above his head. Basalt to 750 BC, The Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no VA 971
  • Relief panels depicting a lion hunt found in the palace district in the ruins of Coba Höyük, also known as Sakçe Gözü or Sakçagözü, archaeological site in southeastern Anatolia, Turkey.  Warriors are fighting with the lion from a chariot and on foot wearing armour . Basalt to 750 BC, The Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no VA 971
  • Relief panels depicting a lion hunt found in the palace district in the ruins of Coba Hoyuk, also known as Sakçe Gözü or Sakcagozu, archaeological site in southeastern Anatolia, Turkey.  Warriors are fighting with the lion from a chariot and on foot. The soldiers in the chariot have armour as does the horse  The archer, probably the ruler, is under the protection of the gods, indicated by the winged sun above his head. Basalt to 750 BC, The Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no VA 971
  • Relief panels depicting a lion hunt found in the palace district in the ruins of Coba Hoyuk, also known as Sakçe Gözü or Sakcagozu, archaeological site in southeastern Anatolia, Turkey.  Warriors are fighting with the lion from a chariot and on foot. The soldiers in the chariot have armour as does the horse  The archer, probably the ruler, is under the protection of the gods, indicated by the winged sun above his head. Basalt to 750 BC, The Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no VA 971
  • Fragment of a relief panels orthostat with a representation and inscription of Prince Barrakib by Sam 'al /Zincirli. At the top of the panel are symbols of various God's. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Pergamon Museum, Berlin. Inv S6581
  • Relief panels orthostat from northern part of the hall at the Palace of Sam 'al - Zincirli. On the throne sits the Prince Barrakib. Above his head each side of a crescent moon  are inscriptions in Aramaic "I am Barrakib, son of Panammuwa" and the inscription "My Lord of the Ba 'al of Harran" with symbols of the moon god. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no VA2817
  • Relief panels orthostat from northern part of the hall at the Palace of Sam 'al - Zincirli. On the throne sits the Prince Barrakib, before him stands a scribe with his pen with a writing board under his arm. Above their heads each side of a crescent moon  are inscriptions in Aramaic "I am Barrakib, son of Panammuwa" and the inscription "My Lord of the Ba 'al of Harran" with symbols of the moon god.Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC.  Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no VA2817
  • Relief panels orthostat from northern part of the hall at the Palace of Sam 'al - Zincirli. On the throne sits the Prince Barrakib, before him stands a scribe with his pen with a writing board under his arm. Above their heads each side of a crescent moon  are inscriptions in Aramaic "I am Barrakib, son of Panammuwa" and the inscription "My Lord of the Ba 'al of Harran" with symbols of the moon god.Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC.  Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no VA2817
  • Relief panels orthostat from northern part of the hall at the Palace of Sam 'al - Zincirli. On the throne sits the Prince Barrakib, before him stands a scribe with his pen with a writing board under his arm. Above their heads each side of a crescent moon  are inscriptions in Aramaic "I am Barrakib, son of Panammuwa" and the inscription "My Lord of the Ba 'al of Harran" with symbols of the moon god.Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC.  Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no VA2817
  • Lion sculptures from the city gate of  Sam'al - Zincirli. Neo Syro Hittite. Basalt 8th century BC. Pergamon Museum Berlin.
  • Lion sculptures from the city gate of  Sam'al - Zincirli. Neo Syro Hittite. Basalt 8th century BC. Pergamon Museum Berlin.
  • Lion sculptures from the city gate of  Sam'al - Zincirli. Neo Syro Hittite. Basalt 8th century BC. Pergamon Museum Berlin.
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Column base Sphix sculpture support. Found in North Hall at the Castle of Sam'al - Zincirli. Basalt 8th century BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no 3017
  • Relief panels orthostat showing a man with a gazelle on the shoulders excavated from the Northern Hall at  Sam'al / Zincirli, Turkey. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no  VA3007
  • Relief panels Orthostats with representation from court officials de front a vessel, the second supporting arms. Found in North Hall of Sam'al - Zincirli. Basalt 8th Century BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no 3000
  • Relief panels Orthostats with representation from court officials de front a vessel, the second supporting arms. Found in North Hall of Sam'al - Zincirli. Basalt 8th Century BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no 3000
  • Column base Sphix sculpture support. Found in North Hall at the Castle of Sam'al - Zincirli. Basalt 8th century BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no 3017
  • Relief panels orthostat from Sam 'al /Zincirli. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • Relief panels orthostat with representation by court officials, they served as a wall covering of palaces at the castle of Sam'al - Zincirli. Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no VA2997, 2998, S6586
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Lion sculptures from the city gate of  Sam'al - Zincirli. Neo Syro Hittite. Basalt 8th century BC. Pergamon Museum Berlin.
  • Lion sculptures from the city gate of  Sam'al - Zincirli. Neo Syro Hittite. Basalt 8th century BC. Pergamon Museum Berlin.
  • Lion sculptures from the city gate of  Sam'al - Zincirli. Neo Syro Hittite. Basalt 8th century BC. Pergamon Museum Berlin.
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Lion sculptures from the city gate of  Sam'al - Zincirli. Neo Syro Hittite. Basalt 8th century BC. Pergamon Museum Berlin.
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Column base Sphix sculpture support. Found in North Hall at the Castle of Sam'al - Zincirli. Basalt 8th century BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no 3017
  • Column base Sphix sculpture support. Found in North Hall at the Castle of Sam'al - Zincirli. Basalt 8th century BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no 3017
  • Relief panels Orthostats with representation from court officials de front a vessel, the second supporting arms. Found in North Hall of Sam'al - Zincirli. Basalt 8th Century BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no 3000
  • Relief panels orthostat from Sam 'al /Zincirli. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • Relief panels orthostat from Sam 'al /Zincirli. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • Relief panels orthostat from Sam 'al /Zincirli. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • Relief panels orthostat from Sam 'al /Zincirli. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • Relief panels orthostat with representation by court officials, they served as a wall covering of palaces at the castle of Sam'al - Zincirli. Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no VA2997, 2998, S6586
  • Relief panels orthostat with representation by court officials, they served as a wall covering of palaces at the castle of Sam'al - Zincirli. Pergamon Museum, Berlin,
  • Relief panels orthostat with representation by court officials, they served as a wall covering of palaces at the castle of Sam'al - Zincirli. Pergamon Museum, Berlin,
  • Relief panels orthostat with representation by court officials, they served as a wall covering of palaces at the castle of Sam'al - Zincirli. Pergamon Museum, Berlin,
  • A Colossal Statue of the Weather God Hadad found near Gerdshin near Sam'al / Zincirli , Turkey. The lower part of the body of the statue has Aramaic text which starts " I am Panamuwa, the son of QRL, the king of Ja'udi, I have erected this statue of Hadad, at my eternal grave.  Originally the statue would have held lightening rods and an axe. On his round cap are bull horns known as the symbols of divinity. The weather God brought the rains which in the dry areas of Mesopotamia was all important. The inscription goes on to read " May the soul of Panamuwa eat with Hadad, May the soul of Panamuwa drink with Hadad". Basalt 775 BC, Pergamon Museum Berlin, inv no VA 2882.
  • A Colossal Statue of the Weather God Hadad found near Gerdshin near Sam'al / Zincirli , Turkey. The lower part of the body of the statue has Aramaic text which starts " I am Panamuwa, the son of QRL, the king of Ja'udi, I have erected this statue of Hadad, at my eternal grave.  Originally the statue would have held lightening rods and an axe. On his round cap are bull horns known as the symbols of divinity. The weather God brought the rains which in the dry areas of Mesopotamia was all important. The inscription goes on to read " May the soul of Panamuwa eat with Hadad, May the soul of Panamuwa drink with Hadad". Basalt 775 BC, Pergamon Museum Berlin, inv no VA 2882.
  • Relief panels depicting a lion hunt found in the palace district in the ruins of Coba Höyük, also known as Sakçe Gözü or Sakçagözü, archaeological site in southeastern Anatolia, Turkey.  Warriors are fighting with the lion from a chariot and on foot wearing armour . Basalt to 750 BC, The Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no VA 971
  • Relief panels depicting a lion hunt found in the palace district in the ruins of Coba Hoyuk, also known as Sakçe Gözü or Sakcagozu, archaeological site in southeastern Anatolia, Turkey.  Warriors are fighting with the lion from a chariot and on foot. The soldiers in the chariot have armour as does the horse  The archer, probably the ruler, is under the protection of the gods, indicated by the winged sun above his head. Basalt to 750 BC, The Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no VA 971
  • Fragment of a relief panels orthostat with a representation and inscription of Prince Barrakib by Sam 'al /Zincirli. At the top of the panel are symbols of various God's. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Pergamon Museum, Berlin. Inv S6581
  • Fragment of a relief panels orthostat with a representation and inscription of Prince Barrakib by Sam 'al /Zincirli. At the top of the panel are symbols of various God's. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Pergamon Museum, Berlin. Inv S6581
  • Fragment of a relief panels orthostat with a representation and inscription of Prince Barrakib by Sam 'al /Zincirli. At the top of the panel are symbols of various God's. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Pergamon Museum, Berlin. Inv S6581
  • Relief panels orthostat from northern part of the hall at the Palace of Sam 'al - Zincirli. On the throne sits the Prince Barrakib, before him stands a scribe with his pen with a writing board under his arm. Above their heads each side of a crescent moon  are inscriptions in Aramaic "I am Barrakib, son of Panammuwa" and the inscription "My Lord of the Ba 'al of Harran" with symbols of the moon god.Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC.  Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no VA2817
  • Lion sculptures from the city gate of  Sam'al - Zincirli. Neo Syro Hittite. Basalt 8th century BC. Pergamon Museum Berlin.
  • Relief panels orthostat from Sam 'al /Zincirli. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • Relief panels Orthostats with representation from court officials de front a vessel, the second supporting arms. Found in North Hall of Sam'al - Zincirli. Basalt 8th Century BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no 3000
  • Relief panels orthostat from Sam 'al /Zincirli. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • Relief panels orthostat from Sam 'al /Zincirli. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • Column base Sphix sculpture support. Found in North Hall at the Castle of Sam'al - Zincirli. Basalt 8th century BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no 3017
  • Column base Sphix sculpture support. Found in North Hall at the Castle of Sam'al - Zincirli. Basalt 8th century BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no 3017
  • Relief panels Orthostats with representation from court officials de front a vessel, the second supporting arms. Found in North Hall of Sam'al - Zincirli. Basalt 8th Century BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no 3000
  • Relief panels orthostat with representation by court officials, they served as a wall covering of palaces of Sam'al - Zincirli. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin,
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Lion sculptures from the city gate of  Sam'al - Zincirli. Neo Syro Hittite. Basalt 8th century BC. Pergamon Museum Berlin.
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Relief panels orthostat showing a man with a gazelle on the shoulders excavated from the Northern Hall at  Sam'al / Zincirli, Turkey. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no  VA3007
  • Relief panels orthostat with representation by court officials, they served as a wall covering of palaces at the castle of Sam'al - Zincirli. Pergamon Museum, Berlin,
  • A Colossal Statue of the Weather God Hadad found near Gerdshin near Sam'al / Zincirli , Turkey. The lower part of the body of the statue has Aramaic text which starts " I am Panamuwa, the son of QRL, the king of Ja'udi, I have erected this statue of Hadad, at my eternal grave.  Originally the statue would have held lightening rods and an axe. On his round cap are bull horns known as the symbols of divinity. The weather God brought the rains which in the dry areas of Mesopotamia was all important. The inscription goes on to read " May the soul of Panamuwa eat with Hadad, May the soul of Panamuwa drink with Hadad". Basalt 775 BC, Pergamon Museum Berlin, inv no VA 2882.
  • Relief panels depicting a lion hunt found in the palace district in the ruins of Coba Höyük, also known as Sakçe Gözü or Sakçagözü, archaeological site in southeastern Anatolia, Turkey.  Warriors are fighting with the lion from a chariot and on foot wearing armour . Basalt to 750 BC, The Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no VA 971
  • Relief panels depicting a lion hunt found in the palace district in the ruins of Coba Hoyuk, also known as Sakçe Gözü or Sakcagozu, archaeological site in southeastern Anatolia, Turkey.  Warriors are fighting with the lion from a chariot and on foot. The soldiers in the chariot have armour as does the horse  The archer, probably the ruler, is under the protection of the gods, indicated by the winged sun above his head. Basalt to 750 BC, The Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no VA 971
  • Lion sculptures from the city gate of  Sam'al - Zincirli. Neo Syro Hittite. Basalt 8th century BC. Pergamon Museum Berlin.
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf, ancient Guzana, in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats from the Palace of King Kapara are in a Neo Hittite style and depict an Archer. Louvre Museum, Paris, inv AO11072
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf, ancient Guzana, in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical God. Louvre Museum, Paris, inv AO11073
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf, ancient Guzana, in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats from the Palace of King Kapara are in a Neo Hittite style and depict an Archer. Louvre Museum, Paris, inv AO11072
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf, ancient Guzana, in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical God. Louvre Museum, Paris, inv AO11073
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf, ancient Guzana, in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats from the Palace of King Kapara are in a Neo Hittite style and depict an Archer. Louvre Museum, Paris, inv AO11072
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf, ancient Guzana, in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats from the Palace of King Kapara are in a Neo Hittite style and depict an Archer. Louvre Museum, Paris, inv AO11072
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf, ancient Guzana, in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical God. Louvre Museum, Paris, inv AO11073
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf, ancient Guzana, in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical God. Louvre Museum, Paris, inv AO11073
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC Basalt Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict soldiers fighting. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical Bird. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC Basalt Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict soldiers fighting. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC Basalt Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict soldiers fighting. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical lion. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Part of an altarpiece made from enameled brick found on the forecourt of the temple-palace of Guyana /Tell Halaf. The decoration is made up of wavebands, rosettes, and semicircles that interpreted as a representing mountains. Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no VA14646
  • A Colossal statue of a Bird of Prey excavated in the forecourt of a temple palace at Tell Halaf, Syria. Originally the bird statue had coloured stones in its eye socket and was mounted as part of a decorative column. Basalt 9th century BC. Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical Bird. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical Bull. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin Museum Inv No: OP  22,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin , Museum Inv No VAS 8852
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • A Colossal statue of a Bird of Prey excavated in the forecourt of a temple palace at Tell Halaf, Syria. Originally the bird statue had coloured stones in its eye socket and was mounted as part of a decorative column. Basalt 9th century BC. Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • 9th century BC Basalt Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict soldiers fighting. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC Basalt Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict soldiers fighting. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin Museum Inv No: OP 18,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin OP VAS 8854,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin . Museum Inv No VAS 8841,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin . Museum Inv No: VA 8850
  • 9th century BC Basalt Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict soldiers fighting. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC Basalt Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict soldiers fighting. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical lion. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical lion. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical Bird. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical Bird. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical Bull. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Part of an altarpiece made from enameled brick found on the forecourt of the temple-palace of Guyana /Tell Halaf. The decoration is made up of wavebands, rosettes, and semicircles that interpreted as a representing mountains. Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no VA14646
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin. Museum Inv No: VA 8859, 8843, 8845, 8840, 8850, 8844, 8856
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin Museum Inv No: OP 14,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin . Museum Inv No: VA  8856
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin . Museum Inv No: VA  8840,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin . Museum Inv No: VA 8844,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin . Museum Inv No: VA  8856
  • A Colossal statue of a Bird of Prey excavated in the forecourt of a temple palace at Tell Halaf, Syria. Originally the bird statue had coloured stones in its eye socket and was mounted as part of a decorative column. Basalt 9th century BC. Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • 9th century BC Basalt Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict soldiers fighting. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical lion. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical Bird. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical Bird. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical Bull. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Part of an altarpiece made from enameled brick found on the forecourt of the temple-palace of Guyana /Tell Halaf. The decoration is made up of wavebands, rosettes, and semicircles that interpreted as a representing mountains. Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no VA14646
  • Part of an altarpiece made from enameled brick found on the forecourt of the temple-palace of Guyana /Tell Halaf. The decoration is made up of wavebands, rosettes, and semicircles that interpreted as a representing mountains. Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no VA14646
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • A Colossal statue of a Bird of Prey excavated in the forecourt of a temple palace at Tell Halaf, Syria. Originally the bird statue had coloured stones in its eye socket and was mounted as part of a decorative column. Basalt 9th century BC. Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • 9th century BC Basalt Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict soldiers fighting. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical Bird. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical Bird. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical Bull. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Fragment of a stele depicting a seated woman and a rider on a horse. Neo Syro Hittite, Basalt 8th century BC. Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no VA15208
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin.  Museum Inv No: OP 18, 22, 19, 14, 15, VAS 8854, 8841, 8852
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin Museum Inv No: OP 19,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin Museum Inv No: OP 15
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin. Museum Inv No: VA 8843
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin . Museum Inv No: VA 8845,
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Neo Hittite architectural column base, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC Basalt Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict soldiers fighting. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC Basalt Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict soldiers fighting. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC Basalt Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict soldiers fighting. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin Museum Inv No: OP 14,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin. Museum Inv No: VA 8843
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin . Museum Inv No: VA  8840,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin . Museum Inv No: VA  8840,
  • Fragment of a stele depicting a seated woman and a rider on a horse. Neo Syro Hittite, Basalt 8th century BC. Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no VA15208
  • Fragment of a stele depicting a seated woman and a rider on a horse. Neo Syro Hittite, Basalt 8th century BC. Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no VA15208
  • Fragment of a stele depicting a seated woman and a rider on a horse. Neo Syro Hittite, Basalt 8th century BC. Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no VA15208
  • Babylonian stone relief sculpture. announcing a land deed of Adad-apla-iddina, 4th Dynasty king of Babylon from 1067 BC to 1046 BC . Copied from an original in the Pushkin Museum, Moscow. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Neo Hittite architectural column base, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Neo Hittite architectural column base, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin.  Museum Inv No: OP 18, 22, 19, 14, 15, VAS 8854, 8841, 8852
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin.  Museum Inv No: OP 18, 22, 19, 14, 15, VAS 8854, 8841, 8852
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin.  Museum Inv No: OP 18, 22, 19, 14, 15, VAS 8854, 8841, 8852
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin Museum Inv No: OP 18,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin Museum Inv No: OP 18,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin Museum Inv No: OP  22,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin Museum Inv No: OP 19,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin Museum Inv No: OP 14,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin , Museum Inv No VAS 8852
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin , Museum Inv No VAS 8852
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin . Museum Inv No: VA  8856
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin . Museum Inv No: VA 8850
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin . Museum Inv No: VA 8850
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin . Museum Inv No: VA 8850
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin . Museum Inv No: VA 8844,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Babylonian stone relief sculpture. announcing a land deed of Adad-apla-iddina, 4th Dynasty king of Babylon from 1067 BC to 1046 BC . Copied from an original in the Pushkin Museum, Moscow. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Babylonian Hammurabi stone relief sculpture. Hammurabi was the sixth Amorite king of Babylon from 1792 BC to 1750 BC . Hammurabi (standing), depicted as receiving his royal insignia from Shamash. Hammurabi holds his hands over his mouth as a sign of prayer. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Babylonian stone relief sculpture. announcing a land deed of Adad-apla-iddina, 4th Dynasty king of Babylon from 1067 BC to 1046 BC . Copied from an original in the Pushkin Museum, Moscow. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Babylonian Hammurabi stone relief sculpture. Hammurabi was the sixth Amorite king of Babylon from 1792 BC to 1750 BC . Hammurabi (standing), depicted as receiving his royal insignia from Shamash. Hammurabi holds his hands over his mouth as a sign of prayer. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin

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Picture The Past

ABOUT

FunkyStock Picture Library free resource for professional editorial picture editors, picture researchers, historical scholars and students and enthusiasts who want to browse some of the best pictures and images of historic countries, historical places, archaeological sites and the very best museum antiquities and artefacts exhibits in Europe and the Middle East.

Pictures and Images can be downloaded or bought as stock photos or photo art prints.

COUNTRIES

Browse travel pictures and images of historic places and archaeological sites of countries in Europe and the Middle East.

VIEW COUNTRIES INDEX....

HISTORICAL

Explore the past through pictures and images of its historic places. See the great palaces, castles and cities of antiquity as well as the great archaeological sites where our ancestors made history.

EXPLORE HISTORICAL PLACES...

MUSEUMS

Browse pictures & images the treasured artefacts and antiquities exhibits from the great Museum of Europe and the Middle East. See the art and objects made by our ancestors.

SEE MUESEUM ANTIQUITIES....