• Relief sculpture panels depicting men bearing gifts in the New Year festival, . From the reign of Darius 1st or Xerxes (485-465 BC) of the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire excavated from the Palace of Darius 1st Persepolis, present day Iran. Persepolis was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The panels depict the festival of New Year (Noruz) in which representatives of all the peoples of the realm participated. This panel comes from the stairways of the palace and show men bearing gifts. The clothing of this man with a lamb identifies him as a Mede. Persepolis was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The panels depict the festival of New Year (Noruz) in which representatives of all the peoples of the realm participated. This panel comes from the stairways of the palace and show men bearing gifts. The clothing of this man identifies him as a Persian. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Bronze statuette of a Lion from the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire 6th to 5th cent. BC excavated from the Acropolis Susa, present day Iran.. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels from the staircase walls excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC. Inv AOD 490-491, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Relief sculpture panels depicting men bearing gifts in the New Year festival, . From the reign of Darius 1st or Xerxes (485-465 BC) of the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire excavated from the Palace of Darius 1st Persepolis, present day Iran. Persepolis was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The panels depict the festival of New Year (Noruz) in which representatives of all the peoples of the realm participated. This panel comes from the stairways of the palace and show men bearing gifts. The clothing of this man with a lamb identifies him as a Mede. Persepolis was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The panels depict the festival of New Year (Noruz) in which representatives of all the peoples of the realm participated. This panel comes from the stairways of the palace and show men bearing gifts. The clothing of this man with a lamb identifies him as a Mede.. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Bronze statuette of a Lion from the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire 6th to 5th cent. BC excavated from the Acropolis Susa, present day Iran.. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels from the staircase walls excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC. Inv AOD 490-491, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels from the staircase walls excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC. Inv AOD 490-491, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Bronze statuette of a Lion from the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire 6th to 5th cent. BC excavated from the Acropolis Susa, present day Iran.. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Bronze statuette of a Lion from the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire 6th to 5th cent. BC excavated from the Acropolis Susa, present day Iran.. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Bronze statuette of a Lion from the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire 6th to 5th cent. BC excavated from the Acropolis Susa, present day Iran.. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Marble Anatolian Persian Funerary Stele, 5th cent. B.C, from Dascyleium ( Ergili, Manyas ) Turkey.  Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 5763 T.
  • Marble Anatolian Persian Funerary Stele, 5th cent. B.C, from Dascyleium ( Ergili, Manyas ) Turkey.  Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 5763 T.
  • Marble Anatolian Persian Funerary Stele, 5th cent. B.C, from Dascyleium ( Ergili, Manyas ) Turkey.  Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 5763 T.
  • Marble Anatolian Persian Funerary Stele, 5th cent. B.C, from Dascyleium ( Ergili, Manyas ) Turkey.  Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 5763 T.
  • Seljuk headstones  with Arabic & Persian floral, geometric & calligraphic decorations in the Seljuk Cemetary at Ahlat, Lake Van, Turkey. Cenetary dates from eleventh to sixteenth century. 2
  • Seljuk headstones  with Arabic & Persian floral, geometric & calligraphic decorations in the Seljuk Cemetary at Ahlat, Lake Van, Turkey. Cenetary dates from eleventh to sixteenth century. 1
  • Seljuk headstones  with Arabic & Persian floral, geometric & calligraphic decorations in the Seljuk Cemetary at Ahlat, Lake Van, Turkey. Cenetary dates from eleventh to sixteenth century. 3
  • Procession of Chariot & Horsemen freeze  from the Heros Shrine of the Acropolis of Xanthos, thought to be the shrines of legendary warriors of the trojan wars built by King Kuprlli (480 - 440 B.C). Xanthos was under Persian rule at the time & the freeze has the static style of persian sculpture with a Greek style.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-16-20.17-19 (sculptures B311-313).
  • Procession of Chariot & Horsemen freeze  from the Heros Shrine of the Acropolis of Xanthos, thought to be the shrines of legendary warriors of the trojan wars built by King Kuprlli (480 - 440 B.C). Xanthos was under Persian rule at the time & the freeze has the static style of persian sculpture with a Greek style.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-16-20.17-19 (sculptures B311-313).
  • Procession of Chariot & Horsemen freeze  from the Heros Shrine of the Acropolis of Xanthos, thought to be the shrines of legendary warriors of the trojan wars built by King Kuprlli (480 - 440 B.C). Xanthos was under Persian rule at the time & the freeze has the static style of persian sculpture with a Greek style.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-16-20.17-19 (sculptures B311-313).
  • Procession of Chariot & Horsemen freeze  from the Heros Shrine of the Acropolis of Xanthos, thought to be the shrines of legendary warriors of the trojan wars built by King Kuprlli (480 - 440 B.C). Xanthos was under Persian rule at the time & the freeze has the static style of persian sculpture with a Greek style.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-16-20.17-19 (sculptures B311-313).
  • Procession of Chariot & Horsemen freeze  from the Heros Shrine of the Acropolis of Xanthos, thought to be the shrines of legendary warriors of the trojan wars built by King Kuprlli (480 - 440 B.C). Xanthos was under Persian rule at the time & the freeze has the static style of persian sculpture with a Greek style.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-16-20.17-19 (sculptures B311-313).
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Procession of Chariot & Horsemen freeze  from the Heros Shrine of the Acropolis of Xanthos, thought to be the shrines of legendary warriors of the trojan wars built by King Kuprlli (480 - 440 B.C). Xanthos was under Persian rule at the time & the freeze has the static style of persian sculpture with a Greek style.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-16-20.17-19 (sculptures B311-313).
  • Freeze from the Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb" after the female headed birds at the corners (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Freeze from the Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb" after the female headed birds at the corners (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Alexander the Great from the Roman mosaic  of Battle beween Alexander the Great and Persian King Darius, 120-125 BC, Casa del Fauno, Pompeii, inv 10020, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • King Darius from the Roman mosaic  of Battle beween Alexander the Great and Persian King Darius, 120-125 BC, Casa del Fauno, Pompeii, inv 10020, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • King Darius from the Roman mosaic  of Battle beween Alexander the Great and Persian King Darius, 120-125 BC, Casa del Fauno, Pompeii, inv 10020, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • The Tomb of Payava ( 360 B.C), a typical Gothic arch shaped double barrel vaulted pillar tomb. From an inscription on the Tomb Payava was a ruler under Persian rule of Xanthos.  From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • The Tomb of Payava ( 360 B.C), a typical Gothic arch shaped double barrel vaulted pillar tomb. From an inscription on the Tomb Payava was a ruler under Persian rule of Xanthos.  From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Freeze from the Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb" after the female headed birds at the corners (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Procession of Chariot & Horsemen freeze  from the Heros Shrine of the Acropolis of Xanthos, thought to be the shrines of legendary warriors of the trojan wars built by King Kuprlli (480 - 440 B.C). Xanthos was under Persian rule at the time & the freeze has the static style of persian sculpture with a Greek style.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-16-20.17-19 (sculptures B311-313).
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • The Tomb of Payava ( 360 B.C), a typical Gothic arch shaped double barrel vaulted pillar tomb. From an inscription on the Tomb Payava was a ruler under Persian rule of Xanthos.  From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Freeze from the Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb" after the female headed birds at the corners (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Freeze from the Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb" after the female headed birds at the corners (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
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The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • The Tomb of Payava ( 360 B.C), a typical Gothic arch shaped double barrel vaulted pillar tomb. From an inscription on the Tomb Payava was a ruler under Persian rule of Xanthos.  From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Freeze from the Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb" after the female headed birds at the corners (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Statue of a Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) from the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid  Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The 4th-century Arch of Roman Tetrach Emperor Galerius, clebrating his victory of the  Sassanid Persians. Thessalonica, Greece.
  • Hunters freeze from the Large Podium of the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Two warriors clasing shields on a freeze from the Large Podium of the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Hunters freeze from the Large Podium of the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Two warriors clasing shields on a freeze from the Large Podium of the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Two warriors clasing shields on a freeze from the Large Podium of the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Two warriors clasing shields on a freeze from the Large Podium of the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Two warriors clasing shields on a freeze from the Large Podium of the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Statue of a Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) from the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid  Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Two warriors clasing shields on a freeze from the Large Podium of the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Statue of a Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) from the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid  Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Statue of a Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) from the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid  Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The 4th-century Arch of Roman Tetrach Emperor Galerius, clebrating his victory of the  Sassanid Persians. Thessalonica, Greece.
  • The 4th-century Arch of Roman Tetrach Emperor Galerius, clebrating his victory of the  Sassanid Persians. Thessalonica, Greece.
  • The 4th-century Arch of Roman Tetrach Emperor Galerius, clebrating his victory of the  Sassanid Persians. Thessalonica, Greece.
  • Statue of a Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) from the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid  Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Two warriors clasing shields on a freeze from the Large Podium of the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Statue of a Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) from the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid  Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.

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