• Neolithic remains of mud brick houses walls of the north ecavation area, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Building 321. Empty burial pit in the floor of the Neolithic remains of mud brick house, north ecavation area, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • looking across the south area across the Neolithic remains of mud brick houses walls. In the centre it can be seen how deep the excavation has gone so far. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Neolithic wall remains of mud brick houses walls of the north ecavation area, 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Empty burial pits inside a Neolithic remains of mud brick houses of the north ecavation area, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Empty burial pits inside a Neolithic remains of mud brick houses of the north ecavation area, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Building 321. Empty burial pit in the floor of the Neolithic remains of mud brick house. In the top right is a darker area which was the midden or refuse pile from the house. North ecavation area, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • looking up hill of the south area across square Neolithic remains of mud brick houses walls. In the centre it can be seen how deep the excavation has gone so far. The sand bags proetct the highest mud brick walls in this area. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • looking up hill of the south area across square Neolithic remains of mud brick houses walls. In the centre it can be seen how deep the excavation has gone so far. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • looking down from the highest point of the south area across the Neolithic remains of mud brick houses walls. In the centre it can be seen how deep the excavation has gone so far. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • looking down from the highest point of the south area across the Neolithic remains of mud brick houses walls. In the centre it can be seen how deep the excavation has gone so far. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Neolithic remains of mud brick houses walls of the north ecavation area, 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Neolithic remains of mud brick houses walls of the north ecavation area, 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Building 321. Empty burial pit in the floor of the Neolithic remains of mud brick house. In the top right is a darker area which was the midden or refuse pile from the house, 7500 BC to 5700 BC. North ecavation area, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Building 321. Empty burial pit in the floor of the Neolithic remains of mud brick house. In the top right is a darker area which was the midden or refuse pile from the house, 7500 BC to 5700 BC. North ecavation area, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Neolithic remains of mud brick houses walls of the north ecavation area, 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Neolithic remains of the square mud brick houses walls of the north ecavation area, 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Neolithic remains of mud brick houses walls of the north ecavation area, 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Neolithic wall remains of mud brick houses walls of the north ecavation area, 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Empty burial pits inside a Neolithic remains of mud brick houses of the north ecavation area, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Neolithic remains of mud brick houses walls of the north ecavation area, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Empty burial pits inside a Neolithic remains of mud brick houses of the north ecavation area, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • looking up hill of the south area across square Neolithic remains of mud brick houses walls. In the centre it can be seen how deep the excavation has gone so far. The sand bags proetct the highest mud brick walls in this area. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • looking down from the highest point of the south area across the Neolithic remains of mud brick houses walls. In the centre it can be seen how deep the excavation has gone so far. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • looking down from the highest point of the south area across the Neolithic remains of mud brick houses walls. In the centre it can be seen how deep the excavation has gone so far. 7500 BC to 5700 BC. Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • looking down from the highest point of the south area across the Neolithic remains of mud brick houses walls. In the centre it can be seen how deep the excavation has gone so far. 7500 BC to 5700 BC. Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Protective roof constructed to protect the south excavation area, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Neolithic wall remains of mud brick houses walls of the north ecavation area, 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Empty burial pits inside a Neolithic remains of mud brick houses of the north ecavation area, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Building 321. Close up of the empty burial pit in the floor of the Neolithic remains of mud brick house, north ecavation area, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Protective roof constructed to protect the north excavation area, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Neolithic remains of mud brick houses walls of the north ecavation area, 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Neolithic wall remains of mud brick houses walls of the north ecavation area, 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric doorway with false triangular corbel of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC), Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia..
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric p[assageway inside the walls  of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC), Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric p[assageway inside the walls  of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC), Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric tholos shaped interior of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC), Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia..
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • Structure 8 of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • Structure 8 of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • Recontructed fresco of an original found at Catalhoyuk. The men are hunting a deer and pulling on its tounge to disable it. The hunters are believed by scholors to be wearing leopard skin costumes, Painted by Mutlu Gundiler. Reconstructed houses, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Reconstruction of a geometric wall painting of building 77 of the north area, 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Close up of a recontructed fresco of an original found at Catalhoyuk. The men are hunting an animal. Reconstructed houses, Painted by Mutlu Gundiler. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Close up of a recontructed fresco of an original found at Catalhoyuk. The depicted men are wearing what scolars believe were leopard skin costumes. Painted by Mutlu Gundiler. Reconstructed houses, 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • An exposed skeleton which were found in pits under the floors of some houses. On the wall are frescoes of what look like vultures, Scholars belive that dead bodies were subject to excarnation which means that their flesh was stripped from the body to leave the skeleton. A reconstruction of one of four Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • A plastered bull skull and frescoes of a reconstruction of one of four Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Recontructed fresco of an original found at Catalhoyuk. The men are hunting a deer and pulling on its tounge to disable it. The hunters are believed by scholors to be wearing leopard skin costumes, Painted by Mutlu Gundiler. Reconstructed houses, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Recontructed fresco of an original found at Catalhoyuk. The men are hunting a deer and pulling on its tounge to disable it. The hunters are believed by scholors to be wearing leopard skin costumes, Painted by Mutlu Gundiler. Reconstructed houses, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Close up of a recontructed fresco of an original found at Catalhoyuk. The men are hunting a deer and pulling on its tounge to disable it. The hunters are believed by scholors to be wearing leopard skin costumes, Reconstructed houses, Painted by Mutlu Gundiler. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Recontructed fresco of an original found at Catalhoyuk depicting two animals being hunted. The men are wearing what scolars believe were leopard skin costumes. Painted by Mutlu Gundiler. Reconstructed houses, 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • A clay oven below a ladder which led to the main entrance via the roof, which also allowed smoke out. A reconstruction of one of four Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • An exposed skeleton which were found in pits under the floors of some houses. On the wall are frescoes of what look like vultures, Scholars belive that dead bodies were subject to excarnation which means that their flesh was stripped from the body to leave the skeleton. A reconstruction of one of four Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • A plastered bull skull and frescoes of a reconstruction of one of four Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Reconstruction of 4 Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. The leopard frescoes on the wall were not found in this room reconstruction. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Recontructed fresco of what are possibly two leopards found at Catalhoyuk. Reconstructed houses, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Recontructed fresco of an original found at Catalhoyuk. The men are hunting a deer and pulling on its tounge to disable it. The hunters are believed by scholors to be wearing leopard skin costumes, Painted by Mutlu Gundiler. Reconstructed houses, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Recontruction of a wall painting found in building no 2 of the north area. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Recontructed fresco of an original found at Catalhoyuk. The hunters are believed by scholors to be wearing leopard skin costumes, Painted by Mutlu Gundiler. Reconstructed houses, 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Recontructed fresco of an original found at Catalhoyuk depicting two animals being hunted. The men are wearing what scolars believe were leopard skin costumes. Painted by Mutlu Gundiler. Reconstructed houses, 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • A close up of a clay oven in a reconstruction of one of four Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • An exposed skeleton which were found in pits under the floors of some houses. On the wall are frescoes of what look like vultures, Scholars belive that dead bodies were subject to excarnation which means that their flesh was stripped from the body to leave the skeleton. A reconstruction of one of four Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • An exposed skeleton which were found in pits under the floors of some houses. On the wall are frescoes of what look like vultures, Scholars belive that dead bodies were subject to excarnation which means that their flesh was stripped from the body to leave the skeleton. A reconstruction of one of four Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • A clay oven below a ladder which led to the main entrance via the roof, which also allowed smoke out. A reconstruction of one of four Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Reconstruction of 4 Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. The leopard frescoes on the wall were not found in this room reconstruction. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • A plastered bull skull and frescoes of a reconstruction of one of four Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Recontructed fresco of an original hunting scene found at Catalhoyuk. Reconstructed houses, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Recontructed fresco of an original found at Catalhoyuk. The men are hunting a boar. The hunters are believed by scholors to be wearing leopard skin costumes, Painted by Mutlu Gundiler. Reconstructed houses, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Recontructed fresco of an original found at Catalhoyuk depicting two animals being hunted. The men are wearing what scolars believe were leopard skin costumes. Painted by Mutlu Gundiler. Reconstructed houses, 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Aurochs skulls covered in lime plaster to make waht appear to be seats. On the wall are frescoes of hand prints will a platererd bulls skull. A reconstruction of one of four Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • A plastered bull skull and frescoes of a reconstruction of one of four Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • A plastered bull skull and frescoes of a reconstruction of one of four Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • A plastered bull skull and frescoes of a reconstruction of one of four Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the central courtyard and prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the central courtyard and prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric central Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric trangular "False" or corbel arch of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the exterior walls of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower and nuragic village archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the exterior walls of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower and nuragic village archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the central courtyard and prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the central courtyard and prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the central courtyard and prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric central Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric central Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the Byzantine Romanesque church of Santa Sabina and the prehistoric Nuragic ruins of Nuraghe Santa Sabina, archaeological site, Middle Bronze age , Silanus ,  Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the Byzantine Romanesque church of Santa Sabina and the prehistoric Nuragic ruins of Nuraghe Santa Sabina, archaeological site, Middle Bronze age , Silanus ,  Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the exterior walls of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower and nuragic village archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the exterior walls of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower and nuragic village archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the central courtyard and prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera round prehistoric Nuragic village archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric Nuragic village meeting hall with Nuraghe tower behind,  archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric central Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric central Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric central Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric Nuragic ruins of Nuraghe Santa Sabina, archaeological site, Middle Bronze age , Silanus ,  Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the Byzantine Romanesque church of Santa Sabina and the prehistoric Nuragic ruins of Nuraghe Santa Sabina, archaeological site, Middle Bronze age , Silanus ,  Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the interior courtyard of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the exterior walls of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower and nuragic village archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the central courtyard and prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the central courtyard and prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric round walled Nuragic village houses with its Nuraghe tower behind, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the central courtyard and prehistoric megalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric round walled Nuragic village houses with its Nuraghe tower behind, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric round walled Nuragic village houses with its Nuraghe tower behind, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.

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