• Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric doorway with false triangular corbel of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC), Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia..
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric p[assageway inside the walls  of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC), Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric p[assageway inside the walls  of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC), Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric tholos shaped interior of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC), Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia..
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric nuragic conical stone betyls representing female fertility with 2 small carved breasts, probably nuragic sacred stones, The Prehistoric Nuragic Complex of Tamuli, Macomer, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric nuragic conical stone betyls representing female fertility with 2 small carved breasts, probably nuragic sacred stones, The Prehistoric Nuragic Complex of Tamuli, Macomer, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric nuragic conical stone betyls representing female fertility with 2 small carved breasts, probably nuragic sacred stones, The Prehistoric Nuragic Complex of Tamuli, Macomer, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric nuragic Giants Tomb foundation ruins, The Prehistoric Nuragic Complex of Tamuli, Macomer, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric nuragic conical stone betyls representing female fertility with 2 small carved breasts, probably nuragic sacred stones, The Prehistoric Nuragic Complex of Tamuli, Macomer, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric nuragic conical stone betyls representing female fertility with 2 small carved breasts, probably nuragic sacred stones, The Prehistoric Nuragic Complex of Tamuli, Macomer, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric nuragic Giants Tomb foundation ruins, The Prehistoric Nuragic Complex of Tamuli, Macomer, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric nuragic conical stone betyls representing female fertility with 2 small carved breasts, probably nuragic sacred stones, The Prehistoric Nuragic Complex of Tamuli, Macomer, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric nuragic conical stone betyls representing female fertility with 2 small carved breasts, probably nuragic sacred stones, The Prehistoric Nuragic Complex of Tamuli, Macomer, Sardinia.
  • Prehistoric Steinacleit Standing Stones, with a stone circle of a burial mount, date unknown but anywhere between 1500-3000BC, Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Prehistoric Steinacleit Standing Stones, with a stone circle of a burial mount, date unknown but anywhere between 1500-3000BC, Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Prehistoric Steinacleit Standing Stones, with a stone circle of a burial mount, date unknown but anywhere between 1500-3000BC, Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Prehistoric Steinacleit Standing Stones, with a stone circle of a burial mount, date unknown but anywhere between 1500-3000BC, Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Prehistoric Steinacleit Standing Stones, with a stone circle of a burial mount, date unknown but anywhere between 1500-3000BC, Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Prehistoric Steinacleit Standing Stones, with a stone circle of a burial mount, date unknown but anywhere between 1500-3000BC, Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Prehistoric Steinacleit Standing Stones, with a stone circle of a burial mount, date unknown but anywhere between 1500-3000BC, Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Prehistoric Steinacleit Standing Stones, with a stone circle of a burial mount, date unknown but anywhere between 1500-3000BC, Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Prehistoric Steinacleit Standing Stones, with a stone circle of a burial mount, date unknown but anywhere between 1500-3000BC, Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Prehistoric Steinacleit Standing Stones, with a stone circle of a burial mount, date unknown but anywhere between 1500-3000BC, Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the exterior walls of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower and nuragic village archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the central courtyard and prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the central courtyard and prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the central courtyard and prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric central Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric central Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the Byzantine Romanesque church of Santa Sabina and the prehistoric Nuragic ruins of Nuraghe Santa Sabina, archaeological site, Middle Bronze age , Silanus ,  Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric trangular "False" or corbel arch of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the exterior walls of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower and nuragic village archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the exterior walls of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower and nuragic village archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the central courtyard and prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the central courtyard and prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera round prehistoric Nuragic village archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric central Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric Nuragic ruins of Nuraghe Santa Sabina, archaeological site, Middle Bronze age , Silanus ,  Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the Byzantine Romanesque church of Santa Sabina and the prehistoric Nuragic ruins of Nuraghe Santa Sabina, archaeological site, Middle Bronze age , Silanus ,  Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the interior courtyard of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the exterior walls of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower and nuragic village archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the exterior walls of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower and nuragic village archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the central courtyard and prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the central courtyard and prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera round prehistoric Nuragic village archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric Nuragic village meeting hall with Nuraghe tower behind,  archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric central Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric central Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric central Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric central Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric central Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric central Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric central Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric central Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the Byzantine Romanesque church of Santa Sabina and the prehistoric Nuragic ruins of Nuraghe Santa Sabina, archaeological site, Middle Bronze age , Silanus ,  Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of Nuraghe Arrubiu ( Red Nuraghe), archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC). The Nuraghe Arrubiu is one of the ;argest Nuraghe on Sardinia with a central fortification which had 5 towers reacing 35 -30 mteres high. Orroli, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the central courtyard and prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric round walled Nuragic village houses with its Nuraghe tower behind, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the central courtyard and prehistoric megalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric round walled Nuragic village houses with its Nuraghe tower behind, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric round walled Nuragic village houses with its Nuraghe tower behind, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric round walled Nuragic village houses with its Nuraghe tower behind, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric central Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the exterior ruins of Palmavera prehistoric central Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Pictures and image of the interior of the Nuraghe tower of Palmavera prehistoric  Nuraghe tower archaeological site, middle Bronze age (1500 BC), Alghero, Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the Byzantine Romanesque church of Santa Sabina and the prehistoric Nuragic ruins of Nuraghe Santa Sabina, archaeological site, Middle Bronze age , Silanus ,  Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric magalith ruins of the multi towered Nuraghe Serbissi, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 - 10 th century BC). Nuraghe Serbissi is situated at over 900 meters on a remote limestone plateau in central Sardinia.  Osini in Ogliastra, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the central courtyard and prehistoric magalith ruins of Santu Antine Nuraghe tower, archaeological site, Bronze age (19-18th century BC), Torralba, Sardinia.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • Neolithic Standing Stones of Stenness, Isle of Orkney, Scotland
  • Neolithic Standing Stones of Stenness, Isle of Orkney, Scotland
  • Neolithic Standing Stones of Stenness, Isle of Orkney, Scotland
  • Neolithic Standing Stones of Stenness, Isle of Orkney, Scotland
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • Neolithic Standing Stones of Stenness, Isle of Orkney, Scotland
  • Neolithic Standing Stones of Stenness, Isle of Orkney, Scotland
  • Neolithic Standing Stones of Stenness, Isle of Orkney, Scotland
  • Neolithic Standing Stones of Stenness, Isle of Orkney, Scotland
  • Neolithic Standing Stones of Stenness, Isle of Orkney, Scotland
  • Neolithic Standing Stones of Stenness, Isle of Orkney, Scotland
  • Neolithic Standing Stones of Stenness, Isle of Orkney, Scotland
  • Neolithic Standing Stones of Stenness, Isle of Orkney, Scotland
  • Neolithic Standing Stones of Stenness, Isle of Orkney, Scotland
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • Neolithic Standing Stones of Stenness, Isle of Orkney, Scotland
  • Neolithic Standing Stones of Stenness, Isle of Orkney, Scotland
  • Neolithic Standing Stones of Stenness, Isle of Orkney, Scotland
  • Neolithic Standing Stones of Stenness, Isle of Orkney, Scotland
  • Neolithic Standing Stones of Stenness, Isle of Orkney, Scotland
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • Structure 8 of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • Structure 8 of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,

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