• Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Vitellius, excavated  from Althiburos sculpted circa 20 April 69-20 Dec 69AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.1784.  Against a black background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Vespesien, excavated  from Althiburos sculpted circa  69-79AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.1025
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Lucius Verus, excavated from Bulla Regia Theatre, sculpted circa 161-169 AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis.   Against a grey background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Lucius Verus, excavated from Bulla Regia Theatre, sculpted circa 161-169 AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Gordian 1st, excavated from Carthage ( ruled 3 months in 238AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 3212
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Caracalla, excavated from Thuburbo-Majus, sculpted circa 211-217AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 1347.  Against a white background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Vitellius, excavated  from Althiburos sculpted circa 20 April 69-20 Dec 69AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.1784. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Vespesien, excavated  from Althiburos sculpted circa  69-79AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.1025.  Against a black background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated from Bulla Regia Theatre, sculpted circa late second century. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis.  Against a black background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Lucius Verus, excavated from Bulla Regia Theatre, sculpted circa 161-169 AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Gordian 1st, excavated from Carthage ( ruled 3 months in 238AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 3212. v
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Gordian 1st, excavated from Carthage ( ruled 3 months in 238AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 3212.   Against a grey background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Gordian 1st, excavated from Carthage ( ruled 3 months in 238AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 3212. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Caracalla, excavated from Thuburbo-Majus, sculpted circa 211-217AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 1347
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Caracalla, excavated from Thuburbo-Majus, sculpted circa 211-217AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 1347. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Augustus, excavated from El-Jem, sculpted circa 27BC-14AD The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 72.  Against a white background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Augustus, excavated from El-Jem, sculpted circa 27BC-14AD The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 72.  Against a black background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Augustus, excavated from El-Jem, sculpted circa 27BC-14AD The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 72
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Lucius Verus, excavated from Bulla Regia Theatre, sculpted circa 161-169 AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis.  Against a white background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Vitellius, excavated  from Althiburos sculpted circa 20 April 69-20 Dec 69AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.1784.  Against a white background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Vitellius, excavated  from Althiburos sculpted circa 20 April 69-20 Dec 69AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.1784.   Against a grey background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Vitellius, excavated  from Althiburos sculpted circa 20 April 69-20 Dec 69AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.1784
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Vespesien, excavated  from Althiburos sculpted circa  69-79AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.1025.   Against a grey background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Vespesien, excavated  from Althiburos sculpted circa  69-79AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.1025. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated from Bulla Regia Theatre, sculpted circa late second century. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis.  Against a white background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated from Bulla Regia Theatre, sculpted circa late second century. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis.   Against a grey background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated from Bulla Regia Theatre, sculpted circa late second century. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Lucius Verus, excavated from Bulla Regia Theatre, sculpted circa 161-169 AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis.  Against a black background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Gordian 1st, excavated from Carthage ( ruled 3 months in 238AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 3212.  Against a black background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Caracalla, excavated from Thuburbo-Majus, sculpted circa 211-217AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 1347.  Against a black background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Caracalla, excavated from Thuburbo-Majus, sculpted circa 211-217AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 1347.   Against a grey background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Augustus, excavated from El-Jem, sculpted circa 27BC-14AD The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 72
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Augustus, excavated from El-Jem, sculpted circa 27BC-14AD The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 72. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Vespesien, excavated  from Althiburos sculpted circa  69-79AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.1025.  Against a white background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated from Bulla Regia Theatre, sculpted circa late second century. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Septime Severe, excavated  from Choud El Battan sculpted circa 193-211AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.73
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated  from Carthage made circa 161-180 AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.965.  Against a white background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Septime Severe, excavated  from Choud El Battan sculpted circa 193-211AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.73.  Against a white background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated  from Carthage made circa 161-180 AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.965.   Against a grey background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Septime Severe, excavated  from Choud El Battan sculpted circa 193-211AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.73.   Against a grey background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Septime Severe, excavated  from Choud El Battan sculpted circa 193-211AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.73
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Septime Severe, excavated  from Choud El Battan sculpted circa 193-211AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.73. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated  from Carthage made circa 161-180 AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.965.  Against a black background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated  from Carthage made circa 161-180 AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.965
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated  from Carthage made circa 161-180 AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.965. Against a grey art background.
  • Second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939.   Against a grey background.
  • Second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939
  • Second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939. Against a grey art background.
  • Detail of a second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939. v
  • Detail of a second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939
  • Detail of a second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939. Against a white background.
  • Detail of a second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939. Against a grey art background.
  • Second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939.  Against a white background.
  • Second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939.  Against a black background.
  • Detail of a second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939. Against a black background.
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus better known as Caracalla, made between 210 and 213 AD and excavated from the via Cassia, Rome. The realism of this  sculpture of Caracalla captures cruelty of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Roman Empire. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla's reign was also notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana  granting Roman citizenship to all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. While travelling from Edessa to continue the war with Parthia, he was assassinated while urinating at a roadside near Carrhae on 8 April 217, by Julius Martialis, an officer of his personal bodyguard who was possibly resentful at not being promoted to the rank of centurion.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus better known as Caracalla, made between 210 and 213 AD and excavated from the via Cassia, Rome. The realism of this  sculpture of Caracalla captures cruelty of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Roman Empire. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla's reign was also notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana  granting Roman citizenship to all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. While travelling from Edessa to continue the war with Parthia, he was assassinated while urinating at a roadside near Carrhae on 8 April 217, by Julius Martialis, an officer of his personal bodyguard who was possibly resentful at not being promoted to the rank of centurion.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus better known as Caracalla, made between 210 and 213 AD and excavated from the via Cassia, Rome. The realism of this  sculpture of Caracalla captures cruelty of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Roman Empire. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla's reign was also notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana  granting Roman citizenship to all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. While travelling from Edessa to continue the war with Parthia, he was assassinated while urinating at a roadside near Carrhae on 8 April 217, by Julius Martialis, an officer of his personal bodyguard who was possibly resentful at not being promoted to the rank of centurion.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus better known as Caracalla, made between 210 and 213 AD and excavated from the via Cassia, Rome. The realism of this  sculpture of Caracalla captures cruelty of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Roman Empire. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla's reign was also notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana  granting Roman citizenship to all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. While travelling from Edessa to continue the war with Parthia, he was assassinated while urinating at a roadside near Carrhae on 8 April 217, by Julius Martialis, an officer of his personal bodyguard who was possibly resentful at not being promoted to the rank of centurion.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus better known as Caracalla, made between 210 and 213 AD and excavated from the via Cassia, Rome. The realism of this  sculpture of Caracalla captures cruelty of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Roman Empire. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla's reign was also notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana  granting Roman citizenship to all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. While travelling from Edessa to continue the war with Parthia, he was assassinated while urinating at a roadside near Carrhae on 8 April 217, by Julius Martialis, an officer of his personal bodyguard who was possibly resentful at not being promoted to the rank of centurion.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Vespasian, circa  69 to 79 AD excavated from Minturno. Vespasian was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years. Vespasian was from an equestrian family that rose into the senatorial rank under the Julio–Claudian emperors. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Vespasian, circa  69 to 79 AD excavated from Minturno. Vespasian was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years. Vespasian was from an equestrian family that rose into the senatorial rank under the Julio–Claudian emperors. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Vespasian, circa  69 to 79 AD excavated from Minturno. Vespasian was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years. Vespasian was from an equestrian family that rose into the senatorial rank under the Julio–Claudian emperors. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Vespasian, circa  69 to 79 AD excavated from Minturno. Vespasian was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years. Vespasian was from an equestrian family that rose into the senatorial rank under the Julio–Claudian emperors. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Vespasian, circa  69 to 79 AD excavated from Minturno. Vespasian was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years. Vespasian was from an equestrian family that rose into the senatorial rank under the Julio–Claudian emperors. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros son of zeus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros son of zeus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros son of zeus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros son of zeus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros son of zeus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman sculpture bust of Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus better known as Caracalla, made between 210 and 213 AD and excavated from the via Cassia, Rome. The realism of this  sculpture of Caracalla captures cruelty of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Roman Empire. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla's reign was also notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana  granting Roman citizenship to all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. While travelling from Edessa to continue the war with Parthia, he was assassinated while urinating at a roadside near Carrhae on 8 April 217, by Julius Martialis, an officer of his personal bodyguard who was possibly resentful at not being promoted to the rank of centurion.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus better known as Caracalla, made between 210 and 213 AD and excavated from the via Cassia, Rome. The realism of this  sculpture of Caracalla captures cruelty of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Roman Empire. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla's reign was also notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana  granting Roman citizenship to all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. While travelling from Edessa to continue the war with Parthia, he was assassinated while urinating at a roadside near Carrhae on 8 April 217, by Julius Martialis, an officer of his personal bodyguard who was possibly resentful at not being promoted to the rank of centurion.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus better known as Caracalla, made between 210 and 213 AD and excavated from the via Cassia, Rome. The realism of this  sculpture of Caracalla captures cruelty of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Roman Empire. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla's reign was also notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana  granting Roman citizenship to all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. While travelling from Edessa to continue the war with Parthia, he was assassinated while urinating at a roadside near Carrhae on 8 April 217, by Julius Martialis, an officer of his personal bodyguard who was possibly resentful at not being promoted to the rank of centurion.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus better known as Caracalla, made between 210 and 213 AD and excavated from the via Cassia, Rome. The realism of this  sculpture of Caracalla captures cruelty of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Roman Empire. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla's reign was also notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana  granting Roman citizenship to all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. While travelling from Edessa to continue the war with Parthia, he was assassinated while urinating at a roadside near Carrhae on 8 April 217, by Julius Martialis, an officer of his personal bodyguard who was possibly resentful at not being promoted to the rank of centurion.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus better known as Caracalla, made between 210 and 213 AD and excavated from the via Cassia, Rome. The realism of this  sculpture of Caracalla captures cruelty of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Roman Empire. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla's reign was also notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana  granting Roman citizenship to all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. While travelling from Edessa to continue the war with Parthia, he was assassinated while urinating at a roadside near Carrhae on 8 April 217, by Julius Martialis, an officer of his personal bodyguard who was possibly resentful at not being promoted to the rank of centurion.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelius was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Emperors Trajan's Market ( Mercati Trajanei) . Rome
  • Columns of Emperors Trajan's Forum and Trajans Column . Rome
  • Columns of Emperors Trajan's Forum and Trajans Column . Rome
  • Columns of Emperors Trajan's Forum and Trajans Column . Rome
  • Columns of Emperors Trajan's Forum and Trajans Column . Rome
  • Columns of Emperors Trajan's Forum and Trajans Column . Rome
  • Emperors Trajan's Market ( Mercati Trajanei) . Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD.Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death.. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death.. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Byzantine mosaic of the Virgin and Child was the first of the post-iconoclastic mosaics inaugurated on 29 March 867 by Patriarch Photius and the emperors Michael III and Basil I.  Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Byzantine mosaic of the Virgin and Child was the first of the post-iconoclastic mosaics inaugurated on 29 March 867 by Patriarch Photius and the emperors Michael III and Basil I.  Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Byzantine mosaic of the Virgin and Child was the first of the post-iconoclastic mosaics inaugurated on 29 March 867 by Patriarch Photius and the emperors Michael III and Basil I.  Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Byzantine mosaic of the Virgin and Child was the first of the post-iconoclastic mosaics inaugurated on 29 March 867 by Patriarch Photius and the emperors Michael III and Basil I.  Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Portrait head sculpture of the Roman emperor Lucius Verus ( AD 161-169). Pentalic marble found in Athens.
  • Roman portrait head of a women wearing a priestess crown. Found in Aphrodisias Theatre. First Century AD. Aphrodisias Archaeology Museum Turkey
  • Roman portrait head of a women wearing a priestess crown. Found in Aphrodisias Theatre. First Century AD. Aphrodisias Archaeology Museum Turkey
  • Roman portrait head of a women wearing a priestess crown. Found in Aphrodisias Theatre. First Century AD. Aphrodisias Archaeology Museum Turkey
  • Medieval sculptures of a lion on the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Exterior Wall of Diocletian's, palace,  with the bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Exterior Wall of Diocletian's, palace,  with the bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • The Porta Aurea (Golden Gate) of Roman Emperor  Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Medieval sculptures of a lion on the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Medieval sculptures of a lion on the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Medieval sculptures   of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Medieval sculptures of a lion on the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Exterior Wall of Diocletian's, palace,  with the bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Exterior Wall of Diocletian's, palace,  with the bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Trajans Market  . Rome
  • Trajan's forum and market . Rome
  • Trajans Column . Rome
  • Portrait head sculpture of the Roman emperor Lucius Verus ( AD 161-169). Pentalic marble found in Athens.
  • Portrait head sculpture of the Roman emperor Lucius Verus ( AD 161-169). Pentalic marble found in Athens.
  • Portrait head sculpture of the Roman emperor Lucius Verus ( AD 161-169). Pentalic marble found in Athens.
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Alexander Severus made between 222 and 235 AD and excavated from Ostia. Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. As emperor, Alexander's peace time reign was prosperous. However militarily Rome was confronted with the rising Sassanid Empire. He managed to check the threat of the Sassanids, but when campaigning against Germanic tribes of Germania, Alexander attempted to bring peace by engaging in diplomacy and bribery. This alienated many in the legions and led to a conspiracy to assassinate and replace him. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Alexander Severus made between 222 and 235 AD and excavated from Ostia. Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. As emperor, Alexander's peace time reign was prosperous. However militarily Rome was confronted with the rising Sassanid Empire. He managed to check the threat of the Sassanids, but when campaigning against Germanic tribes of Germania, Alexander attempted to bring peace by engaging in diplomacy and bribery. This alienated many in the legions and led to a conspiracy to assassinate and replace him. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Alexander Severus made between 222 and 235 AD and excavated from Ostia. Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. As emperor, Alexander's peace time reign was prosperous. However militarily Rome was confronted with the rising Sassanid Empire. He managed to check the threat of the Sassanids, but when campaigning against Germanic tribes of Germania, Alexander attempted to bring peace by engaging in diplomacy and bribery. This alienated many in the legions and led to a conspiracy to assassinate and replace him. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Alexander Severus made between 222 and 235 AD and excavated from Ostia. Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. As emperor, Alexander's peace time reign was prosperous. However militarily Rome was confronted with the rising Sassanid Empire. He managed to check the threat of the Sassanids, but when campaigning against Germanic tribes of Germania, Alexander attempted to bring peace by engaging in diplomacy and bribery. This alienated many in the legions and led to a conspiracy to assassinate and replace him. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Alexander Severus made between 222 and 235 AD and excavated from Ostia. Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. As emperor, Alexander's peace time reign was prosperous. However militarily Rome was confronted with the rising Sassanid Empire. He managed to check the threat of the Sassanids, but when campaigning against Germanic tribes of Germania, Alexander attempted to bring peace by engaging in diplomacy and bribery. This alienated many in the legions and led to a conspiracy to assassinate and replace him. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from the ancient market, Rome. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from the ancient market, Rome. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from the ancient market, Rome. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from Albano Laziale. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from Albano Laziale. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from Albano Laziale. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from Albano Laziale. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from the ancient market, Rome. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from the ancient market, Rome. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from Albano Laziale. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue in the nude hero style of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Septimius Severus made between 196 and 197 AD and excavated from Ostia. Severus became Roman emperor in 193 AD After deposing and killing the incumbent emperor Didius Julianus. In 202, he campaigned in Africa and Mauretania against the Garamantes; capturing their capital Garama and expanding the Limes Tripolitanus along the southern frontier of the empire. Late in his reign he travelled to Britain, strengthening Hadrian's Wall and reoccupying the Antonine Wall. Severus died in early 211 at Eboracum (today York, England), succeeded by his sons Caracalla and Geta who fought constantly until Caracalla had Geta murdered. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Septimius Severus made between 196 and 197 AD and excavated from Ostia. Severus became Roman emperor in 193 AD After deposing and killing the incumbent emperor Didius Julianus. In 202, he campaigned in Africa and Mauretania against the Garamantes; capturing their capital Garama and expanding the Limes Tripolitanus along the southern frontier of the empire. Late in his reign he travelled to Britain, strengthening Hadrian's Wall and reoccupying the Antonine Wall. Severus died in early 211 at Eboracum (today York, England), succeeded by his sons Caracalla and Geta who fought constantly until Caracalla had Geta murdered. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Septimius Severus made between 196 and 197 AD and excavated from Ostia. Severus became Roman emperor in 193 AD After deposing and killing the incumbent emperor Didius Julianus. In 202, he campaigned in Africa and Mauretania against the Garamantes; capturing their capital Garama and expanding the Limes Tripolitanus along the southern frontier of the empire. Late in his reign he travelled to Britain, strengthening Hadrian's Wall and reoccupying the Antonine Wall. Severus died in early 211 at Eboracum (today York, England), succeeded by his sons Caracalla and Geta who fought constantly until Caracalla had Geta murdered. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Septimius Severus made between 196 and 197 AD and excavated from Ostia. Severus became Roman emperor in 193 AD After deposing and killing the incumbent emperor Didius Julianus. In 202, he campaigned in Africa and Mauretania against the Garamantes; capturing their capital Garama and expanding the Limes Tripolitanus along the southern frontier of the empire. Late in his reign he travelled to Britain, strengthening Hadrian's Wall and reoccupying the Antonine Wall. Severus died in early 211 at Eboracum (today York, England), succeeded by his sons Caracalla and Geta who fought constantly until Caracalla had Geta murdered. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Septimius Severus made between 196 and 197 AD and excavated from Ostia. Severus became Roman emperor in 193 AD After deposing and killing the incumbent emperor Didius Julianus. In 202, he campaigned in Africa and Mauretania against the Garamantes; capturing their capital Garama and expanding the Limes Tripolitanus along the southern frontier of the empire. Late in his reign he travelled to Britain, strengthening Hadrian's Wall and reoccupying the Antonine Wall. Severus died in early 211 at Eboracum (today York, England), succeeded by his sons Caracalla and Geta who fought constantly until Caracalla had Geta murdered. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Sculpture of Roman Emperor Tiberius and a barbarian captive. Aphrodisias Archaeological museum, Turkey
  • Sculpture of Roman Emperor being crowned with a barbarian captive. Aphrodisias Archaeological museum, Turkey
  • Roman portrait bust of a flavian women possibly Domita, circa 69-96 AD excavated from Terracina. This portrait can be dated from the typical hairstyle made popular by Flavian women. It may be of Domitia Longina who was  wife to the Roman Emperor Domitian. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Publius Septimius Antoninus Geta better known as Geta brother of Caracalla, made between 209 and 212 AD and excavated from the via XX Septembre, Rome. Geta was the younger son of Septimius Severus by his second wife Julia Domna. Geta  was a Roman emperor who ruled with his father Septimius Severus and his older brother Caracalla from 209 until his death, when he was murdered on Caracalla's orders.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Sculpture of Roman Emperor being crowned with a barbarian captive. Aphrodisias Archaeological museum, Turkey
  • Sculpture of Roman Emperor Tiberius and a barbarian captive. Aphrodisias Archaeological museum, Turkey
  • Sculpture of Roman Emperor being crowned with a barbarian captive. Aphrodisias Archaeological museum, Turkey
  • Roof tops of the Medieval city of Split from the bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Sculpture of Roman Emperor being crowned with a barbarian captive. Aphrodisias Archaeological museum, Turkey
  • Exterior Wall an reconstruction illustration of Diocletian's, palace,  with the bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Alexander Severus made between 222 and 235 AD and excavated from Ostia. Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. As emperor, Alexander's peace time reign was prosperous. However militarily Rome was confronted with the rising Sassanid Empire. He managed to check the threat of the Sassanids, but when campaigning against Germanic tribes of Germania, Alexander attempted to bring peace by engaging in diplomacy and bribery. This alienated many in the legions and led to a conspiracy to assassinate and replace him. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Alexander Severus made between 222 and 235 AD and excavated from Ostia. Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. As emperor, Alexander's peace time reign was prosperous. However militarily Rome was confronted with the rising Sassanid Empire. He managed to check the threat of the Sassanids, but when campaigning against Germanic tribes of Germania, Alexander attempted to bring peace by engaging in diplomacy and bribery. This alienated many in the legions and led to a conspiracy to assassinate and replace him. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Alexander Severus made between 222 and 235 AD and excavated from Ostia. Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. As emperor, Alexander's peace time reign was prosperous. However militarily Rome was confronted with the rising Sassanid Empire. He managed to check the threat of the Sassanids, but when campaigning against Germanic tribes of Germania, Alexander attempted to bring peace by engaging in diplomacy and bribery. This alienated many in the legions and led to a conspiracy to assassinate and replace him. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Alexander Severus made between 222 and 235 AD and excavated from Ostia. Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. As emperor, Alexander's peace time reign was prosperous. However militarily Rome was confronted with the rising Sassanid Empire. He managed to check the threat of the Sassanids, but when campaigning against Germanic tribes of Germania, Alexander attempted to bring peace by engaging in diplomacy and bribery. This alienated many in the legions and led to a conspiracy to assassinate and replace him. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Alexander Severus made between 222 and 235 AD and excavated from Ostia. Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. As emperor, Alexander's peace time reign was prosperous. However militarily Rome was confronted with the rising Sassanid Empire. He managed to check the threat of the Sassanids, but when campaigning against Germanic tribes of Germania, Alexander attempted to bring peace by engaging in diplomacy and bribery. This alienated many in the legions and led to a conspiracy to assassinate and replace him. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from the ancient market, Rome. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from the ancient market, Rome. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from the ancient market, Rome. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from the ancient market, Rome. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from Albano Laziale. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from Albano Laziale. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from Albano Laziale. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from the ancient market, Rome. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from Albano Laziale. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from Albano Laziale. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Emperor Caracalla. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no  2014/194. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Caracalla Roman emperor from 198 to 217 AD. He was a member of the Severan Dynasty, the elder son of Septimius Severus and Julia Domna. Co-ruler with his father from 198, he continued to rule with his brother Geta, emperor from 209, after their father's death in 211. He had his brother murdered later that year, and reigned afterwards as sole ruler of the Roman Empire.
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Vespasian, circa 69-79 AD excavated from Ostia. Titus Flavius Caesar Vespasianus Augustus was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Emperor Caracalla. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no  2014/194. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Caracalla Roman emperor from 198 to 217 AD. He was a member of the Severan Dynasty, the elder son of Septimius Severus and Julia Domna. Co-ruler with his father from 198, he continued to rule with his brother Geta, emperor from 209, after their father's death in 211. He had his brother murdered later that year, and reigned afterwards as sole ruler of the Roman Empire.
  • Roman statue of Emperor Caracalla. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no  2014/194. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Caracalla Roman emperor from 198 to 217 AD. He was a member of the Severan Dynasty, the elder son of Septimius Severus and Julia Domna. Co-ruler with his father from 198, he continued to rule with his brother Geta, emperor from 209, after their father's death in 211. He had his brother murdered later that year, and reigned afterwards as sole ruler of the Roman Empire.
  • Roman statue of Emperor Caracalla. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no  2014/194. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Caracalla Roman emperor from 198 to 217 AD. He was a member of the Severan Dynasty, the elder son of Septimius Severus and Julia Domna. Co-ruler with his father from 198, he continued to rule with his brother Geta, emperor from 209, after their father's death in 211. He had his brother murdered later that year, and reigned afterwards as sole ruler of the Roman Empire.
  • Roman statue in the nude hero style of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Vespasian, circa 69-79 AD excavated from Ostia. Titus Flavius Caesar Vespasianus Augustus was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Vespasian, circa 69-79 AD excavated from Ostia. Titus Flavius Caesar Vespasianus Augustus was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Vespasian, circa 69-79 AD excavated from Ostia. Titus Flavius Caesar Vespasianus Augustus was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Vespasian, circa 69-79 AD excavated from Ostia. Titus Flavius Caesar Vespasianus Augustus was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue in the nude hero style of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue in the nude hero style of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy

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