• Roman theatre of the Roman colony of Emerita Augusta (Mérida) dedicated by the consul Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa and built in 15BC, renovated late 1st Century AD, Merida, Estremadura, Spain
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman sculpted frieze blocks with garland relief sculptures, North Portico, Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman sculpted frieze blocks with garland relief sculptures, North Portico, Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman sculpted frieze blocks with garland relief sculptures, North Portico, Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman sculpted frieze blocks with garland relief sculptures, North Portico, Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman sculpted frieze blocks with garland relief sculptures, North Portico, Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman ruins of the circus stadium of Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman ruins of the circus stadium of Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman ruins of the circus stadium of Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman mosaic of a Young boy playing with snakes, possibly an early Christian mosaic. Syria or Lebanon, 5th century AD. Cubes of marble and limestone. Dressed in a long tunic, the child playing with two snakes could be illustrating a passage from the Book of Isai (11.6 to 8). This fragmented mosaic panel once continued in upper part, as indicated by the animal hoofs, and to the right of the mosaic are remains of a Greek inscription. inv 5094. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Odeon (Concert-hall) seating  around 1700 people. It was used also as the Bouleuterion for the meetings of the Senate and remained in this form until the early fifth century.<br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Odeon (Concert-hall) seating  around 1700 people. It was used also as the Bouleuterion for the meetings of the Senate and remained in this form until the early fifth century.<br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman remains in the centre of Thessaloniki, Greece
  • Roman remains in the centre of Thessaloniki, Greece
  • Sebasteion sanctuary building ruins and relief panels,  Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Sebasteion sanctuary building ruins and relief panels,  Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Sebasteion sanctuary building ruins and relief panels,  Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Sebasteion sanctuary building ruins and relief panels,  Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Sebasteion sanctuary building ruins and relief panels,  Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Sebasteion sanctuary building ruins and relief panels,  Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Theatre colonade of Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Close up of the pediments of the Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Close up of the pediments of the Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman mosaic of a Young boy playing with snakes, possibly an early Christian mosaic. Syria or Lebanon, 5th century AD. Cubes of marble and limestone. Dressed in a long tunic, the child playing with two snakes could be illustrating a passage from the Book of Isai (11.6 to 8). This fragmented mosaic panel once continued in upper part, as indicated by the animal hoofs, and to the right of the mosaic are remains of a Greek inscription. inv 5094. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of a Young boy playing with snakes, possibly an early Christian mosaic. Syria or Lebanon, 5th century AD. Cubes of marble and limestone. Dressed in a long tunic, the child playing with two snakes could be illustrating a passage from the Book of Isai (11.6 to 8). This fragmented mosaic panel once continued in upper part, as indicated by the animal hoofs, and to the right of the mosaic are remains of a Greek inscription. inv 5094. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of a Young boy playing with snakes, possibly an early Christian mosaic. Syria or Lebanon, 5th century AD. Cubes of marble and limestone. Dressed in a long tunic, the child playing with two snakes could be illustrating a passage from the Book of Isai (11.6 to 8). This fragmented mosaic panel once continued in upper part, as indicated by the animal hoofs, and to the right of the mosaic are remains of a Greek inscription. inv 5094. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of a Young boy playing with snakes, possibly an early Christian mosaic. Syria or Lebanon, 5th century AD. Cubes of marble and limestone. Dressed in a long tunic, the child playing with two snakes could be illustrating a passage from the Book of Isai (11.6 to 8). This fragmented mosaic panel once continued in upper part, as indicated by the animal hoofs, and to the right of the mosaic are remains of a Greek inscription. inv 5094. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Main hall of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls. The Greco Roman Bath Gymnasium stands behind.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Main hall of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls. The Greco Roman Bath Gymnasium stands behind.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Main hall of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls. The Greco Roman Bath Gymnasium stands behind.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Picture of A Roman Theatre reconstructed over an earlier Greek theatre under the reign of Hadrian after the earthquake of 60 AD. The facade is 300 feet (91 m) long, the full extent of which remains standingand the cavea has 50 rows of seats. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of A Roman Theatre reconstructed over an earlier Greek theatre under the reign of Hadrian after the earthquake of 60 AD. The facade is 300 feet (91 m) long, the full extent of which remains standingand the cavea has 50 rows of seats. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of A Roman Theatre reconstructed over an earlier Greek theatre under the reign of Hadrian after the earthquake of 60 AD. The facade is 300 feet (91 m) long, the full extent of which remains standingand the cavea has 50 rows of seats. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of A Roman Theatre reconstructed over an earlier Greek theatre under the reign of Hadrian after the earthquake of 60 AD. The facade is 300 feet (91 m) long, the full extent of which remains standingand the cavea has 50 rows of seats. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of A Roman Theatre reconstructed over an earlier Greek theatre under the reign of Hadrian after the earthquake of 60 AD. The facade is 300 feet (91 m) long, the full extent of which remains standingand the cavea has 50 rows of seats. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of A Roman Theatre reconstructed over an earlier Greek theatre under the reign of Hadrian after the earthquake of 60 AD. The facade is 300 feet (91 m) long, the full extent of which remains standingand the cavea has 50 rows of seats. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Main hall of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls. The Greco Roman Bath Gymnasium stands behind.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Main hall of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls. The Greco Roman Bath Gymnasium stands behind.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Forecourt of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • The remains of the grain stores showing underground heating piers,  Houseteads Roman Fort, Veronicum, Hadrians Wall, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Northumberland, England, UK
  • The remains of the grain stores showing underground heating piers,  Houseteads Roman Fort, Veronicum, Hadrians Wall, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Northumberland, England, UK
  • The remains of the grain stores showing underground heating piers,  Houseteads Roman Fort, Veronicum, Hadrians Wall, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Northumberland, England, UK
  • The remains of the grain stores showing underground heating piers,  Houseteads Roman Fort, Veronicum, Hadrians Wall, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Northumberland, England, UK
  • The remains of the grain stores showing underground heating piers,  Houseteads Roman Fort, Veronicum, Hadrians Wall, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Northumberland, England, UK
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD eagle decorated column base of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Forecourt of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Remains of a Roman temple in the Plazza Navona region of  Rome
  • Remains of a Roman temple in the Plazza Navona region of  Rome
  • Remains of a Roman temple in the Plazza Navona region of  Rome
  • Remains of a Roman temple in the Plazza Navona region of  Rome
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Forecourt of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD eagle decorated column base of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric wall mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric wall mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Forecourt of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric wall mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides; Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg.; Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2; 300 to 1; 900 years ago; and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding; but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Remains of the Süleyman Mosque in the ancient citadel of Hasankeyf on the cliffs above the Tigris, Turkey
  • Remains of the Süleyman Mosque in the ancient citadel of Hasankeyf on the cliffs above the Tigris, Turkey 1
  • Remains of medieval Artukid Old Tigris Bridge – Built in 1116 by Artukid Fahrettin Karaaslan, the biggest in Anatolia at the time, with the old town Hasankeyf and its ruins on the cliffs abover the river Tigris. The minaret is of the El Rizk Mosque built 1409.  Turkey. 8
  • Remains of medieval Artukid Old Tigris Bridge – Built in 1116 by Artukid Fahrettin Karaaslan, the biggest in Anatolia at the time, with the old town Hasankeyf and its ruins on the cliffs abover the river Tigris. The minaret is of the El Rizk Mosque built 1409.  Turkey. 4
  • Remains of medieval Artukid Old Tigris Bridge – Built in 1116 by Artukid Fahrettin Karaaslan, the biggest in Anatolia at the time, with the old town Hasankeyf and its ruins on the cliffs abover the river Tigris. The minaret is of the El Rizk Mosque built 1409.  Turkey. 3
  • Remains of medieval Artukid Old Tigris Bridge – Built in 1116 by Artukid Fahrettin Karaaslan, the biggest in Anatolia at the time, with the old town Hasankeyf and its ruins on the cliffs abover the river Tigris. The minaret is of the El Rizk Mosque built 1409.  Turkey. 6
  • Remains of medieval Artukid Old Tigris Bridge – Built in 1116 by Artukid Fahrettin Karaaslan, the biggest in Anatolia at the time, with the old town Hasankeyf and its ruins on the cliffs abover the river Tigris. The minaret is of the El Rizk Mosque built 1409.  Turkey. 5
  • Remains of medieval Artukid Old Tigris Bridge – Built in 1116 by Artukid Fahrettin Karaaslan, the biggest in Anatolia at the time, with the old town Hasankeyf and its ruins on the cliffs abover the river Tigris. The minaret is of the El Rizk Mosque built 1409.  Turkey. 4
  • Remains of medieval Artukid Old Tigris Bridge – Built in 1116 by Artukid Fahrettin Karaaslan, the biggest in Anatolia at the time, with the old town Hasankeyf and its ruins on the cliffs abover the river Tigris. The minaret is of the El Rizk Mosque built 1409.  Turkey. 3
  • Remains of medieval Artukid Old Tigris Bridge – Built in 1116 by Artukid Fahrettin Karaaslan, the biggest in Anatolia at the time, with the old town Hasankeyf and its ruins on the cliffs abover the river Tigris. The minaret is of the El Rizk Mosque built 1409.  Turkey. 1
  • Remains of medieval Artukid Old Tigris Bridge – Built in 1116 by Artukid Fahrettin Karaaslan, the biggest in Anatolia at the time, with the old town Hasankeyf and its ruins on the cliffs abover the river Tigris. The minaret is of the El Rizk Mosque built 1409.  Turkey. 8
  • Remains of medieval Artukid Old Tigris Bridge – Built in 1116 by Artukid Fahrettin Karaaslan, the biggest in Anatolia at the time, with the old town Hasankeyf and its ruins on the cliffs abover the river Tigris. The minaret is of the El Rizk Mosque built 1409.  Turkey. 3
  • Remains of medieval Artukid Old Tigris Bridge – Built in 1116 by Artukid Fahrettin Karaaslan, the biggest in Anatolia at the time, with the old town Hasankeyf and its ruins on the cliffs abover the river Tigris. The minaret is of the El Rizk Mosque built 1409.  Turkey. 6
  • Remains of medieval Artukid Old Tigris Bridge – Built in 1116 by Artukid Fahrettin Karaaslan, the biggest in Anatolia at the time, with the old town Hasankeyf and its ruins on the cliffs abover the river Tigris. The minaret is of the El Rizk Mosque built 1409.  Turkey. 5
  • Remains of medieval Artukid Old Tigris Bridge – Built in 1116 by Artukid Fahrettin Karaaslan, the biggest in Anatolia at the time, with the old town Hasankeyf and its ruins on the cliffs abover the river Tigris. The minaret is of the El Rizk Mosque built 1409.  Turkey. 2
  • Remains of medieval Artukid Old Tigris Bridge – Built in 1116 by Artukid Fahrettin Karaaslan, the biggest in Anatolia at the time, with the old town Hasankeyf and its ruins on the cliffs abover the river Tigris. The minaret is of the El Rizk Mosque built 1409.  Turkey. 1
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides; Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg.; Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2; 300 to 1; 900 years ago; and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding; but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.

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