• Roman sculptural decorations  on  The Arch Of Constantine built to celebrate victory over Maxentius . Rome. Rome
  • Roman sculptural decorations  on  The Arch Of Constantine built to celebrate victory over Maxentius . Rome. Rome
  • Roman sculptural decorations  on  The Arch Of Constantine built to celebrate victory over Maxentius . Rome. Rome
  • Roman sculptural decorations  on  The Arch Of Constantine built to celebrate victory over Maxentius . Rome. Rome
  • Roman sculptural decorations  on  The Arch Of Constantine built to celebrate victory over Maxentius . Rome. Rome
  • Roman sculptural decorations  on  The Arch Of Constantine built to celebrate victory over Maxentius . Rome. Rome
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • "Pan & Goat" Roman Mythical erotic sculpture from Pompeii. Naples Archaeological inv no: 27709
  • Alexander the Great from the Roman mosaic  of Battle beween Alexander the Great and Persian King Darius, 120-125 BC, Casa del Fauno, Pompeii, inv 10020, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • King Darius from the Roman mosaic  of Battle beween Alexander the Great and Persian King Darius, 120-125 BC, Casa del Fauno, Pompeii, inv 10020, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • King Darius from the Roman mosaic  of Battle beween Alexander the Great and Persian King Darius, 120-125 BC, Casa del Fauno, Pompeii, inv 10020, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Roman mosaic of Pan and Hamadryad, a Greek mythological being that lives in trees , found in Pompeii, from the Farnese Collection, inv no 227708, Naples Archaeological Museum
  • Erotic Roman Mosaic of Pigmies in boats fornicating on the River Nile from Rome, inv 122861,  Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum , grey background
  • Erotic Roman Mosaic of Pigmies in boats fornicating on the River Nile from Rome, inv 122861,  Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum , grey background
  • Erotic Roman Mosaic of Pigmies in boats fornicating on the River Nile from Rome, inv 122861,  Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum , white background
  • Erotic Roman Mosaic of Pigmies in boats fornicating on the River Nile from Rome, inv 122861,  Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum , grey background
  • Erotic Roman Mosaic of Pigmies in boats fornicating on the River Nile from Rome, inv 122861,  Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum , black background
  • Erotic Roman Mosaic of Pigmies in boats fornicating on the River Nile from Rome, inv 122861,  Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum , art background
  • A Roman erotic fresco painting from Pompeii form the venereum, a room for sexual activities, of Casa di Cecilio Giocondo 50-79 AD  , inv no 10569 , Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • A satyr caressing a maiden a Roman erotic fresco painting from Pompeii 1st cent AD , from the Casa di L Cecilio Giocondo, inv no 110590 , Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples Archaeological Museum
  • A satyr caressing a maiden a Roman erotic fresco painting from Pompeii 1st cent AD , from the Casa di L Cecilio Giocondo, inv no 110590 , Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples Archaeological Museum
  • A satyr caressing a maiden a Roman erotic fresco painting from Pompeii 1st cent AD , from the Casa di L Cecilio Giocondo, inv no 110590 , Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples Archaeological Museum
  • Satyr surprising a maiden, a Roman erotic fresco painting from Pompeii, 50-79 AD , inv no 27693 , Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Roman Erotic Fresco from Pompeii, 1st cent AD , workshop Banner showing Mercury with a massive phalus , Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Satyr being rejected by Hermaphrodite, a Roman erotic fresco painting from Pompeii, 50-79 AD , inv no 110878 , Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Pan and  Hermaphrodite, a Roman erotic fresco painting from Pompeii, 50-79 AD , inv no 27700 , Naples National Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Archaeological Museum
  • Satyr caressing Hermaphrodite, a Roman erotic fresco painting from Pompeii, 50-79 AD , from the tablium of the Casa di Epidio Sabino, inv no 27875 ,Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Roman Erotic Fresco from Pompeii, 1st cent AD , workshop Banner showing Mercury with a massive phalus , Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Roman erotic fresco painting of Hermaphrodite from Heraculeum, 1-50 AD , inv no 9224 , Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Polyphemus caressing Galatea, a Roman erotic fresco painting from Pompeii, 50-79 AD , from the Casa dei Capitelli colorati, inv no 27687 , Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Mars caressing Venus  a Roman erotic fresco painting from Pompeii 1st cent AD , from the Casa del Meleagro, inv no 9250 , Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • A Roman erotic fresco painting from Pompeii form a private house venereum, a room for sexual activities, 50-79 AD , , inv no 27696 , Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Mars caressing Venus  a Roman erotic fresco painting from Pompeii 1st cent AD , from the Casa del Meleagro, inv no 9250 , Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Polyphemus caressing Galatea, a Roman erotic fresco painting from Pompeii, 50-79 AD , from the Casa dei Capitelli colorati, inv no 27687 , Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Satyr caressing Hermaphrodite, a Roman erotic fresco painting from Pompeii, 50-79 AD , from the tablium of the Casa di Epidio Sabino, inv no 27875 ,Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Satyr caressing Hermaphrodite, a Roman erotic fresco painting from Pompeii, 50-79 AD , from the tablium of the Casa di Epidio Sabino, inv no 27875 ,Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Satyr being rejected by Hermaphrodite, a Roman erotic fresco painting from Pompeii, 50-79 AD , inv no 110878 , Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman relief sculpture panel decorated on both sides with masks from the second half of the 1st cent. AD excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Italy. The panel is sculpted on both sides; the front side depicts the half moon shaped face of a deity wearing a crown.  Inv 112158, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panel of Medusa from a Roman ship, the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The head of the medusa is an example of refined craftsmanship. The detail of the hair, the scales, the snakes and the nostrils were made using hand held tools . the work is at its most frightening when viewed from a low anyle suggesting that it was designed to be places high up on the ship .  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • South Porch, Right Portal, Tympanum- General View.This portal is dedicated to the Confessors. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Tympanum and Lintel: Miracles by two very popular saints, Martin and Nicholas, are shown on the tympanum and lintel. Both saints have figures on the jambs below and several windows in the interior lower level and clerestory..On the left is the Miracle of Martin's cloak. In the lower left panel, Martin, a young Roman stationed in Amiens, met a beggar at the city gate one cold day. Moved by the man's suffering, Martin cut his cloak in half and gave him one of the pieces. In the upper left panel, Martin is shown sleeping. His dream is shown on the tympanum; Christ appears wearing the piece of the cloak he gave to the beggar, who had really been Christ..On the right are miracles of Nicholas. In the bottom panel, Nicholas anonymously gives dowries to three indigent girls. On the upper right, pilgrims at Nicholas's tomb, which supposedly gave off a miraculous healing fluid. .Archivolts: .On the lower register of archivolts are miracles of Gilles, including the Mass of St. Gilles (right). The other archivolts show various Confessors.A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • South Porch, Right Portal, Tympanum- General View.This portal is dedicated to the Confessors. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Tympanum and Lintel: Miracles by two very popular saints, Martin and Nicholas, are shown on the tympanum and lintel. Both saints have figures on the jambs below and several windows in the interior lower level and clerestory..On the left is the Miracle of Martin's cloak. In the lower left panel, Martin, a young Roman stationed in Amiens, met a beggar at the city gate one cold day. Moved by the man's suffering, Martin cut his cloak in half and gave him one of the pieces. In the upper left panel, Martin is shown sleeping. His dream is shown on the tympanum; Christ appears wearing the piece of the cloak he gave to the beggar, who had really been Christ..On the right are miracles of Nicholas. In the bottom panel, Nicholas anonymously gives dowries to three indigent girls. On the upper right, pilgrims at Nicholas's tomb, which supposedly gave off a miraculous healing fluid. .Archivolts: .On the lower register of archivolts are miracles of Gilles, including the Mass of St. Gilles (right). The other archivolts show various Confessors.A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • South Porch, Right Portal, Tympanum- General View.This portal is dedicated to the Confessors. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Tympanum and Lintel: Miracles by two very popular saints, Martin and Nicholas, are shown on the tympanum and lintel. Both saints have figures on the jambs below and several windows in the interior lower level and clerestory..On the left is the Miracle of Martin's cloak. In the lower left panel, Martin, a young Roman stationed in Amiens, met a beggar at the city gate one cold day. Moved by the man's suffering, Martin cut his cloak in half and gave him one of the pieces. In the upper left panel, Martin is shown sleeping. His dream is shown on the tympanum; Christ appears wearing the piece of the cloak he gave to the beggar, who had really been Christ..On the right are miracles of Nicholas. In the bottom panel, Nicholas anonymously gives dowries to three indigent girls. On the upper right, pilgrims at Nicholas's tomb, which supposedly gave off a miraculous healing fluid. .Archivolts: .On the lower register of archivolts are miracles of Gilles, including the Mass of St. Gilles (right). The other archivolts show various Confessors.A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • South Porch, Right Portal, Tympanum- General View.This portal is dedicated to the Confessors. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Tympanum and Lintel: Miracles by two very popular saints, Martin and Nicholas, are shown on the tympanum and lintel. Both saints have figures on the jambs below and several windows in the interior lower level and clerestory..On the left is the Miracle of Martin's cloak. In the lower left panel, Martin, a young Roman stationed in Amiens, met a beggar at the city gate one cold day. Moved by the man's suffering, Martin cut his cloak in half and gave him one of the pieces. In the upper left panel, Martin is shown sleeping. His dream is shown on the tympanum; Christ appears wearing the piece of the cloak he gave to the beggar, who had really been Christ..On the right are miracles of Nicholas. In the bottom panel, Nicholas anonymously gives dowries to three indigent girls. On the upper right, pilgrims at Nicholas's tomb, which supposedly gave off a miraculous healing fluid. .Archivolts: .On the lower register of archivolts are miracles of Gilles, including the Mass of St. Gilles (right). The other archivolts show various Confessors.A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roman relief sculpture panel decorated on both sides with masks from the second half of the 1st cent. AD excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Italy. The panel is sculpted on both sides; the front side depicts the half moon shaped face of a deity wearing a crown.  Inv 112158, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman relief sculpture panel decorated on both sides with masks from the second half of the 1st cent. AD excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Italy. The panel is sculpted on both sides; the front side depicts the half moon shaped face of a deity wearing a crown.  Inv 112158, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman relief sculpture panel decorated on both sides with masks from the second half of the 1st cent. AD excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Italy. The panel is sculpted on both sides; the front side depicts the half moon shaped face of a deity wearing a crown.  Inv 112158, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman relief sculpture panel decorated on both sides with masks from the second half of the 1st cent. AD excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Italy. The panel is sculpted on both sides; the front side depicts the half moon shaped face of a deity wearing a crown.  Inv 112158, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman relief sculpture panel decorated on both sides with masks from the second half of the 1st cent. AD excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Italy. The panel is sculpted on both sides; the front side depicts the half moon shaped face of a deity wearing a crown.  Inv 112158, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman relief sculpture panel decorated on both sides with masks from the second half of the 1st cent. AD excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Italy. The panel is sculpted on both sides; the front side depicts the half moon shaped face of a deity wearing a crown.  Inv 112158, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman relief sculpture panel decorated on both sides with masks from the second half of the 1st cent. AD excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Italy. The panel is sculpted on both sides; the front side depicts the half moon shaped face of a deity wearing a crown.  Inv 112158, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman relief sculpture panel decorated on both sides with masks from the second half of the 1st cent. AD excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Italy. The panel is sculpted on both sides; the front side depicts the half moon shaped face of a deity wearing a crown.  Inv 112158, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman relief sculpture panel decorated on both sides with masks from the second half of the 1st cent. AD excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Italy. The panel is sculpted on both sides; the front side depicts the half moon shaped face of a deity wearing a crown.  Inv 112158, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Roman decoration panel of Medusa from a Roman ship, the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The head of the medusa is an example of refined craftsmanship. The detail of the hair, the scales, the snakes and the nostrils were made using hand held tools . the work is at its most frightening when viewed from a low anyle suggesting that it was designed to be places high up on the ship .  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panel of Medusa from a Roman ship, the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The head of the medusa is an example of refined craftsmanship. The detail of the hair, the scales, the snakes and the nostrils were made using hand held tools . the work is at its most frightening when viewed from a low anyle suggesting that it was designed to be places high up on the ship .  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panel of Medusa from a Roman ship, the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The head of the medusa is an example of refined craftsmanship. The detail of the hair, the scales, the snakes and the nostrils were made using hand held tools . the work is at its most frightening when viewed from a low anyle suggesting that it was designed to be places high up on the ship .  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panel of Medusa from a Roman ship, the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The head of the medusa is an example of refined craftsmanship. The detail of the hair, the scales, the snakes and the nostrils were made using hand held tools . the work is at its most frightening when viewed from a low anyle suggesting that it was designed to be places high up on the ship .  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panel of Medusa from a Roman ship, the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The head of the medusa is an example of refined craftsmanship. The detail of the hair, the scales, the snakes and the nostrils were made using hand held tools . the work is at its most frightening when viewed from a low anyle suggesting that it was designed to be places high up on the ship .  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panel of Medusa from a Roman ship, the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The head of the medusa is an example of refined craftsmanship. The detail of the hair, the scales, the snakes and the nostrils were made using hand held tools . the work is at its most frightening when viewed from a low anyle suggesting that it was designed to be places high up on the ship .  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panel of Medusa from a Roman ship, the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The head of the medusa is an example of refined craftsmanship. The detail of the hair, the scales, the snakes and the nostrils were made using hand held tools . the work is at its most frightening when viewed from a low anyle suggesting that it was designed to be places high up on the ship .  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panel of Medusa from a Roman ship, the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The head of the medusa is an example of refined craftsmanship. The detail of the hair, the scales, the snakes and the nostrils were made using hand held tools . the work is at its most frightening when viewed from a low anyle suggesting that it was designed to be places high up on the ship .  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panel of Medusa from a Roman ship, the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The head of the medusa is an example of refined craftsmanship. The detail of the hair, the scales, the snakes and the nostrils were made using hand held tools . the work is at its most frightening when viewed from a low anyle suggesting that it was designed to be places high up on the ship .  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind. . Against an white background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind.  . Against an black background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind. . Against a grey background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind. Against an art background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind. Against an art background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind. . Against a grey background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind. Against an art background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind.
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind. . Against an white background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind.  . Against an black background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind.
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind. . Against an white background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind. . Against an black background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind. . Against a grey background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind.
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • 13th century Medieval Romanesque Sculptures from the above the central door of the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice, depicting sculptures on the theme Virtues and Beatitudes .
  • Medieval Oriental style Sculptures from the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice
  • Medieval Oriental style Sculptures from the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice
  • Medieval Oriental style Sculptures from the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice
  • Medieval Sculptures from the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice
  • Medieval Oriental style Sculptures from the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice
  • Medieval Sculptures from the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice
  • 13th century Medieval Romanesque Sculptures from the introdos of the second arch of the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice, depicting November from the Months of the Zodiac .
  • 13th century Medieval Romanesque Sculptures from the introdos of the second arch of the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice, depicting December from the Months of the Zodiac .
  • 13th century Medieval Romanesque Sculptures from the above the central door of the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice, depicting fortitude from the theme Virtues and Beatitudes .
  • 13th century Medieval Romanesque Sculptures from the introdos of the second arch of the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice, depicting January from the Months of the Zodiac .
  • 13th century Medieval Romanesque Sculptures from the introdos of the second arch of the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice, depicting October from the Months of the Zodiac .
  • 13th century Medieval Romanesque Sculptures from the above the central door of the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice, depicting Constancy from the theme Virtues and Beatitudes .
  • 13th century Medieval Romanesque Sculptures from the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice, depicting a youth sitting on a bovine.
  • 13th century Medieval Romanesque Sculptures from the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice, depicting a women sitting on a lion below Cain & Abel.
  • 13th century Medieval Romanesque Sculptures from the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice, depicting "Lust" .
  • 13th century Medieval Romanesque Sculptures from the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice, depicting "Lust" and Samson killing the lion cubs.
  • 13th century Medieval Romanesque Sculptures from the introdos of the second arch of the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice, depicting December from the Months of the Zodiac .
  • 13th century Medieval Romanesque Sculptures from the introdos of the second arch of the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice, depicting December from the Months of the Zodiac .
  • 13th century Medieval Romanesque Sculptures from the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice, depicting "Lust" and Samson killing the lion cubs.
  • 13th century Medieval Romanesque Sculptures from the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice, depicting a women sitting on a lion below Cain & Abel.
  • 13th century Medieval Romanesque Sculptures from the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice, depicting "Lust" and Samson killing the lion cubs.
  • 13th century Medieval Romanesque Sculptures from the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice, depicting "Lust".

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