• Roof tops of the Medieval city of Split from the bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Medieval sculptures of a lion on the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Medieval sculptures   of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Exterior Wall of Diocletian's, palace,  with the bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • The Porta Aurea (Golden Gate) of Roman Emperor  Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Medieval sculptures of a lion on the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Medieval sculptures of a lion on the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Medieval sculptures of a lion on the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Exterior Wall of Diocletian's, palace,  with the bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Exterior Wall of Diocletian's, palace,  with the bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Exterior Wall of Diocletian's, palace,  with the bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Exterior Wall an reconstruction illustration of Diocletian's, palace,  with the bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Bell tower  of the Cathedral of St Doimus dedicated to the Virgin mary, originally built onto the octagonal 4th cent AD mausoleum of  Roman Emperor Diocletian. Diocletian's, palace, Split, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Ship anchored outside Split Harbour, Croatia.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C.  King and queen in front of the altar. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Left Panel - The king carries the kingdom sceptre - lituus in his right hand, and extends his left hand forward for worship. The queen wears a fancy dress hanging down to the floor; both figures wear earrings with a large ring.<br />
<br />
Right Panel - Bull. It is the sacred animal of the Storm God. It is over a pedestal which is split from top to bottom. It is stocky and short-legged. With a huge horn, the bull has schematic muscles. In the orthostats on the left side, there is a procession moving towards this bull.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C.  King and queen in front of the altar. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Left Panel - The king carries the kingdom sceptre - lituus in his right hand, and extends his left hand forward for worship. The queen wears a fancy dress hanging down to the floor; both figures wear earrings with a large ring.<br />
<br />
Right Panel - Bull. It is the sacred animal of the Storm God. It is over a pedestal which is split from top to bottom. It is stocky and short-legged. With a huge horn, the bull has schematic muscles. In the orthostats on the left side, there is a procession moving towards this bull. <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C.  King and queen in front of the altar. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Left Panel - The king carries the kingdom sceptre - lituus in his right hand, and extends his left hand forward for worship. The queen wears a fancy dress hanging down to the floor; both figures wear earrings with a large ring.<br />
<br />
Right Panel - Bull. It is the sacred animal of the Storm God. It is over a pedestal which is split from top to bottom. It is stocky and short-legged. With a huge horn, the bull has schematic muscles. In the orthostats on the left side, there is a procession moving towards this bull. <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C.  King and queen in front of the altar. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Left Panel - The king carries the kingdom sceptre - lituus in his right hand, and extends his left hand forward for worship. The queen wears a fancy dress hanging down to the floor; both figures wear earrings with a large ring.<br />
<br />
Right Panel - Bull. It is the sacred animal of the Storm God. It is over a pedestal which is split from top to bottom. It is stocky and short-legged. With a huge horn, the bull has schematic muscles. In the orthostats on the left side, there is a procession moving towards this bull. <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C.  King and queen in front of the altar. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Left Panel - The king carries the kingdom sceptre - lituus in his right hand, and extends his left hand forward for worship. The queen wears a fancy dress hanging down to the floor; both figures wear earrings with a large ring.<br />
<br />
Right Panel - Bull. It is the sacred animal of the Storm God. It is over a pedestal which is split from top to bottom. It is stocky and short-legged. With a huge horn, the bull has schematic muscles. In the orthostats on the left side, there is a procession moving towards this bull. <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Excavations of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Excavations of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • Excavations of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic pillar base of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Excavations of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • Ionic pillar base of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • Romaesque doorway with sculptures of Eve by the Croatian architect Master Radovan. Saint Lawrence Cathedral - Trogir - Croatia<br />
<br />
One of the most beautiful towns on the Croatian coast is Trogir. Surrounded by water Trogir is an unspoiled medieval city with narrow streets leading to its medieval Cathedral of St Lawrence. The Romanesque porch has wonderful early medieval sculptures by the Croatian architect Master Radovan. From the Cathedral tower there is a picturesque view across the pan tiled roof tops of Trogir. <br />
<br />
In the 3rd century BC, Tragurion was founded by Greek colonists from the island of Vis, and it developed into a major port until the Roman period. The name comes from the Greek "tragos" (male goat). Similarly, the name of the neighbouring island of Bua comes from the Greek "voua" (herd of cattle). The sudden prosperity of Salona deprived Trogir of its importance. During the migration of Slavs the citizens of the destroyed Salona escaped to Trogir. From the 9th century on, Trogir paid tribute to Croatian rulers. The diocese of Trogir was established in the 11th century (abolished in 1828; it is now part of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Split-Makarska) and in 1107 it was chartered by the Hungarian-Croatian king Coloman, gaining thus its autonomy as a town.<br />
<br />
Trogir should be high on any visit to Croatia

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