• Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Two bull-men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull-like ears and legs have human bodies. <br />
<br />
On a black background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish). 900-700 BC . Stag. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. With his large and many branched antler, he walks towards the right. <br />
<br />
On a black background.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
 A portion of the body and the feet of the Sphinx. Its chest was processed as fish flakes. Parallel lines on its wings draw attention.  <br />
<br />
On a brown art background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Water Gate. Basalt, 900 - 700 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum. Ankara. Turkey.<br />
<br />
Fragment of Two bull men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull like ears and legs have human bodies.<br />
<br />
On a gray background.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Two bull-men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull-like ears and legs have human bodies. <br />
<br />
On a brown art background.
  • Cut baby red water melon
  • Pictures & Images of the Tortum Water Falls, Coruh Valley, Erzurum in the Eastern Anatolia, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The Tortum water falls are the largest in turkey with a drop of 164 feet (50 m) and 15 meters wide. Geologists believe they were formed in the Quaternary period by a massive landslide which blocked the deep steep sided Tortum Valley. This resulted in the formation of Tortum Lake which is 8 km long, 1 km wide and 100 meters deep.
  • Pictures & Images of the Tortum Water Falls, Coruh Valley, Erzurum in the Eastern Anatolia, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The Tortum water falls are the largest in turkey with a drop of 164 feet (50 m) and 15 meters wide. Geologists believe they were formed in the Quaternary period by a massive landslide which blocked the deep steep sided Tortum Valley. This resulted in the formation of Tortum Lake which is 8 km long, 1 km wide and 100 meters deep.
  • Pictures & Images of the Tortum Water Falls, Coruh Valley, Erzurum in the Eastern Anatolia, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The Tortum water falls are the largest in turkey with a drop of 164 feet (50 m) and 15 meters wide. Geologists believe they were formed in the Quaternary period by a massive landslide which blocked the deep steep sided Tortum Valley. This resulted in the formation of Tortum Lake which is 8 km long, 1 km wide and 100 meters deep.
  • Pictures & Images of the Tortum Water Falls, Coruh Valley, Erzurum in the Eastern Anatolia, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The Tortum water falls are the largest in turkey with a drop of 164 feet (50 m) and 15 meters wide. Geologists believe they were formed in the Quaternary period by a massive landslide which blocked the deep steep sided Tortum Valley. This resulted in the formation of Tortum Lake which is 8 km long, 1 km wide and 100 meters deep.
  • Autumn view of Fountains Abbey & Studley Royal water gardens, founded in 1132, is one of the largest and best preserved ruined Cistercian monasteries in England. The ruined monastery is a focal point of England's most important 18th century Water, the Studley Royal Water Garden which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Near Ripon, North Yorkshire, England
  • Cloisters of Fountains Abbey , founded in 1132, is one of the largest and best preserved ruined Cistercian monasteries in England. The ruined monastery is a focal point of England's most important 18th century Water, the Studley Royal Water Garden which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Near Ripon, North Yorkshire, England
  • Altar area of Fountains Abbey , founded in 1132, is one of the largest and best preserved ruined Cistercian monasteries in England. The ruined monastery is a focal point of England's most important 18th century Water, the Studley Royal Water Garden which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Near Ripon, North Yorkshire, England
  • Entrance at sunrise  of the ruins of Fountains Abbey , founded in 1132, is one of the largest and best preserved ruined Cistercian monasteries in England. The ruined monastery is a focal point of England's most important 18th century Water, the Studley Royal Water Garden which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Near Ripon, North Yorkshire, England
  • Side chapel & bell tower of Fountains Abbey , founded in 1132, is one of the largest and best preserved ruined Cistercian monasteries in England. The ruined monastery is a focal point of England's most important 18th century Water, the Studley Royal Water Garden which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Near Ripon, North Yorkshire, England
  • Bell tower at sunrise  of Fountains Abbey , founded in 1132, is one of the largest and best preserved ruined Cistercian monasteries in England. The ruined monastery is a focal point of England's most important 18th century Water, the Studley Royal Water Garden which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Near Ripon, North Yorkshire, England
  • Gothic arches of the great hall of Fountains Abbey , founded in 1132, is one of the largest and best preserved ruined Cistercian monasteries in England. The ruined monastery is a focal point of England's most important 18th century Water, the Studley Royal Water Garden which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Near Ripon, North Yorkshire, England
  • Gothic arches of the great hall of Fountains Abbey , founded in 1132, is one of the largest and best preserved ruined Cistercian monasteries in England. The ruined monastery is a focal point of England's most important 18th century Water, the Studley Royal Water Garden which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Near Ripon, North Yorkshire, England
  • Ruins of Fountains Abbey , founded in 1132, is one of the largest and best preserved ruined Cistercian monasteries in England. The ruined monastery is a focal point of England's most important 18th century Water, the Studley Royal Water Garden which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Near Ripon, North Yorkshire, England
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • View of the water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • Swimmers in the crystal clear sea water at an isolated cove beach at Riserva Naturale dello Zingaro [ Zingaro nature reserve ] Scopello, Castellammare Del Golfo , Sicily.
  • Stock photos of Hévíz [ Heves ] Thermal lake - Second largest thermal lake in the world with water at 35-36 degree C - Balaton - Hungary
  • Stock photos of Hévíz [ Heves ] Thermal lake - Second largest thermal lake in the world with water at 35-36 degree C - Balaton - Hungary
  • Stock photos of Hévíz [ Heves ] Thermal lake - Second largest thermal lake in the world with water at 35-36 degree C - Balaton - Hungary
  • Stock photos of Hévíz [ Heves ] Thermal lake - Second largest thermal lake in the world with water at 35-36 degree C - Balaton - Hungary
  • Stock photos of Hévíz [ Heves ] Thermal lake - Second largest thermal lake in the world with water at 35-36 degree C - Balaton - Hungary
  • Reflections In Water - Honfleur France
  • Reflections In Water - Honfleur France
  • Reflections In Water - Honfleur France
  • Reflections In Water - Honfleur France
  • Water Taxi on the Grand Canal - Venice Italy
  • Water Taxi on the Grand Canal - Venice Italy
  • Top Shot of salad in a salad basket and salad in water
  • Gondolas in the early morning sun - Vnice Italy.
  • Sailing boats in harbour with Italian style buildings & church. Piran , Slovenia
  • Harour entance with people relaxing and fishing off the harbour wall. Pirates ship.  Piran , Slovenia
  • Canale Della Guideca looking towards Church Rendentore - Venice Italy
  • Canale Della Guidecca - Venice ITALY
  • Gondolas in the early morning sun - Vnice Italy.
  • Arial view form St Mark's Campinale of St Mark's Square and the Doges with the island of San Giorgio Maggiore behind , with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • The island of San Giorgio Maggiore lying east of the Giudecca and south of the main island group, with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • The Grand Canal from Ponte dell'Accademia at sunset; in the foreground Palazzo Cavalli-Franchetti
  • The Grand Canal from Ponte dell'Accademia at sunset; in the foreground Palazzo Cavalli-Franchetti
  • Gondolas on a small Canal near Rialto , Venice, Italy
  • Gondolas on the Grand Canal near St Marks Square , Venice, Italy
  • Gondolas at St Mark's Square with the island of San Giorgio Maggiore behind , with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • Sunset view of gondolas at St Mark's Square with the island of San Giorgio Maggiore behind , with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • The island of San Giorgio Maggiore lying east of the Giudecca and south of the main island group, with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • The Palazzo Cavalli-Franchetti on the Grand Canal from Ponte dell'Accademia at sunset; in the foreground
  • Venetian Gothic Palaces on the Grand Canal Venice
  • Palazzo Ca'Rezzonico built in 1649 by Baldassarre Longhena in a Baroque style on the Grand Canal Venice
  • Gondolas on the Grand Canal near St Marks Square at sunset , Venice, Italy
  • Arial view form St Mark's Campinale of St Mark's Square and the Doges with the island of San Giorgio Maggiore behind , with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • The Grand Canal from Ponte dell'Accademia at sunset; in the foreground Palazzo Cavalli-Franchetti
  • The fountain of Aphrodite of Ephesus, Villa d'Este gardens, Tivoli
  • waterfall of The oval fountain, 1567, Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The Hundred Fountains, 1569, Villa d'Este gardens, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • . internal frescoes & decorations by Livio Agresti from Forlì (1550 to 1572)
  • First Tribune Room ( Prima stanza tribune). The room was probably decorated by Cesare Nebbia in 1569, and the depictions depict the first legendary accounts of Tivoli. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Salon of the Fountain( Sala della Fontana ), the banquet hall of Cardinal Ipollito d"Este. The trompe-l'?il frescoes were carried out by 6 assistants of Girolamo Muziano (1532-1592) were inspired by the "Solomonic" winding columns of the Vatican Basilica to create a loggia decorated by festoons of fruit, flowers & vegetables with a landscape beyond. The rustic fountain at the end of the salon was built by fountain maker Curzio Maccarone and was completed in 1568. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Room of Glory (Stanza della Gloria ). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-68. The frescoes in the vaulted ceiling depict the virtues which consent the fulfilment of "Glory" with allegorical panels depicting Magnanimity, Fortune, Time and Religion. Trompe-l'?il alcoves reveal the Cardinals hat of Ippolito d'Este  . Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Room of The Nobility (Stanza della Nobilta). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-67. Decorated with Trompe-l'?il Ionian Pillars & busts the figures in the panels depict "Virtue" and "Thee Liberal Arts". Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Room of The Nobility (Stanza della Nobilta). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-67. Decorated with Trompe-l'?il Ionian Pillars & busts the figures in the panels depict "Virtue" and "Thee Liberal Arts". Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Room of Hercules ( Sala di Ercole ) Celebrating the deeds of Hercules, the hero of Tivoli, the renaissance frecoes were carried out by 6 assistants of Girolamo Muziano (1532-1592). The central ceiling panel frescoes depict the epilogue of the myth, the Apotheosis of Hercules : the hero is welcomed by the 12 major divinities of Olympus in thanks for his labours. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The fountain of Aphrodite of Ephesus, Villa d'Este gardens, Tivoli
  • Old Pack horse trail well, Kea, Greek Cycaldes Islands
  • Gondola From Academia Bridge - Venice Italy
  • Traditional Sail Fishing Boats on Riva Vena canal - Chioggia - Venice - Italy
  • Fruit market on a boat - Campo San Barnarba - Venice Italy.
  • Fishing Boats outside the market on Riva Vena canal - Chioggia - Venice - Italy
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden with topiary maize - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden with topiary maize - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden with topiary maize - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden with topiary maize - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden and Fountain - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden and Fountain - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden and Fountain - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden and Fountain - England
  • Interlaken Bernese Alps Switzerland - River and wooden wier
  • Interlaken Bernese Alps Switzerland - River and wooden wier
  • Lake Balaton from Szigliget marina at sunset - Hungary
  • Lake Balaton from Szigliget marina at sunset - Hungary
  • rocky alpine foothills stream in the remote valley of Val Verzasca, near lavertezzo , Ticino
  • rocky alpine foothills stream in the remote valley of Val Verzasca, near lavertezzo , Ticino
  • rocky alpine foothills stream in the remote valley of Val Verzasca, near lavertezzo , Ticino
  • Harour entance with people relaxing and fishing off the harbour wall. Piran , Slovenia
  • Sunbathers preparing a sun bed on a sea terrace. Piran , Slovenia
  • Interlaken Bernese Alps Switzerland - Lake & houses with low clouds
  • French Cafe seen through a steamy window
  • Gondola At The Rialto Bridge - Venice Italy
  • Fruit market on a boat - Campo San Barnarba - Venice Italy.
  • Fruit market on a boat - Campo San Barnarba - Venice Italy.
  • Gondola at Campo San Barnarba - Venice Italy.
  • Gondola at Campo San Barnarba - Venice Italy.
  • Gondola at the Rialto Bridge - Venice Italy
  • Gondola at the Rialto Bridge - Venice Italy
  • Fishing Boats on Riva Vena canal - Chioggia - Venice - Italy
  • Fishing Boats on Riva Vena canal - Chioggia - Venice - Italy
  • Fishing Boats outside the market on Riva Vena canal - Chioggia - Venice - Italy
  • Fishing Boats on Riva Vena canal - Chioggia - Venice - Italy
  • Reflection of harbour buildings and yaughts. Honfleur, Normandy, France.
  • Blenheim Palace - Italian Garden fountain
  • Blenheim Palace - Italian Garden fountain
  • Blenheim Palace - Italian Garden  and Palace
  • Blenheim Palace - Italian Garden  and Palace
  • Fresh water being poured into a glass
  • Fresh water being poured into a glass
  • Fresh water being poured into a glass
  • Photo & pictures  of Pamukkale Travetine Terrace, Turkey. Photography of the white Calcium carbonate rock formations. Buy as stock photos or as photo art prints. 4 Pamukkale travetine terrace water cascades, composed of white Calcium carbonate rock formations, Pamukkale, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Photo  of Pamukkale Travetine Terrace, Turkey. Images of the white Calcium carbonate rock formations. Buy as stock photos or as photo art prints. 12 Pamukkale travetine terrace water cascades, composed of white Calcium carbonate rock formations, Pamukkale, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Pictures & Image  of Pamukkale Travetine Terrace, Turkey. Images of the white Calcium carbonate rock formations. Buy as stock photos or as photo art prints. 4 Pamukkale travetine terrace water cascades, composed of white Calcium carbonate rock formations, Pamukkale, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Pictures & Image  of Pamukkale Travetine Terrace, Turkey. Images of the white Calcium carbonate rock formations. Buy as stock photos or as photo art prints. 3 Pamukkale travetine terrace water cascades, composed of white Calcium carbonate rock formations, Pamukkale, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Photo & Image  of Pamukkale Travetine Terrace, Turkey. Images of the white Calcium carbonate rock formations. Buy as stock photos or as photo art prints. 1 Pamukkale travetine terrace water cascades, composed of white Calcium carbonate rock formations, Pamukkale, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Photo & Image  of Pamukkale Travetine Terrace, Turkey. Picture of the white Calcium carbonate rock formations. Buy as stock photos or as photo art prints. 4 Pamukkale travetine terrace water cascades, composed of white Calcium carbonate rock formations, Pamukkale, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Photo & Image  of Pamukkale Travetine Terrace, Turkey. Picture of the white Calcium carbonate rock formations. Buy as stock photos or as photo art prints. 3 Pamukkale travetine terrace water cascades, composed of white Calcium carbonate rock formations, Pamukkale, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Photo & Image  of Pamukkale Travetine Terrace, Turkey, at sunset. Images of the white Calcium carbonate rock formations. Buy as stock photos or as photo art prints. 5 Pamukkale travetine terrace water cascades, composed of white Calcium carbonate rock formations, Pamukkale, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Photo & Image  of Pamukkale Travetine Terrace, Turkey, at sunset. Images of the white Calcium carbonate rock formations. Buy as stock photos or as photo art prints. 3 Pamukkale travetine terrace water cascades, composed of white Calcium carbonate rock formations, Pamukkale, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Hittite terra cotta water bottle carried by straps on the back. Hittite Old Period, 1650 - 1450 BC. Huseyindede. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey
  • Picture & image of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city water drain channel, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • steps amd paths leading to the Phrygian water cistern of Midas city cut deep into the underground rock. 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.
  • Roman Mosaic - The Oceanos & Tethys Mosaic, fom The House of Oceanos, Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The Oceanos and Tethys Mosaic is the floor mosaic of the shallow pool of the House of Oceanos. In this mosaic, which belongs to the Early Roman Empire Period, Oceanos, the river god who is the origin of life, and his wife Tethys are represented. At the middle of the mosaic which is surrounded by a geometric triple tress borders there are Oceanos and his wife Tethys. Around them there are Eros figures riding various species of fish and dolphins symbolising the abundance of the sea. The most represented attributes of Oceanos are snake and fish.<br />
<br />
 in the mosaic, Oceanos is seen with chelas. Those chelas are among his most characteristic attributes. Though the tail of an eel is represented as his feet in the figures on ceramics, within the scope of the art of mosaic he is represented as a bust and only with the chelas on his head such as this one. His wife Tethys is right by his side and represented with wings upon her forehead. Between them, there is the dragon called Cetos which is a mythological sea creature. As is seen in the coins of Zeugma, the Euphrates River is expressed as a dragon. Besides these two figures, on the top-right of the mosaic, there is a young male figure which is thought to be Pan, the patron of fishermen and shepherds. The fact that Eros figures and Pan which are the side figures are located outward implies that the pool is built to allow walking around. <br />
<br />
The expression of the Oceanos as not an ocean but a river surrounding the world: By that the water, which vapours with the heat of the sun and then gives life to the nature by becoming rain, and which after being used by the nature reaches again the sea via the rivers is expressed. The water becomes aware of itself and its function by that cycle. This phenomenon is represented in the mosaic panel as the diversification of Ocenaos through unification wit
  • Roman Mosaic - The Oceanos & Tethys Mosaic, fom The House of Oceanos, Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Oceanos and Tethys Mosaic is the floor mosaic of the shallow pool of the House of Oceanos. In this mosaic, which belongs to the Early Roman Empire Period, Oceanos, the river god who is the origin of life, and his wife Tethys are represented. At the middle of the mosaic which is surrounded by a geometric triple tress borders there are Oceanos and his wife Tethys. Around them there are Eros figures riding various species of fish and dolphins symbolising the abundance of the sea. The most represented attributes of Oceanos are snake and fish.<br />
<br />
 in the mosaic, Oceanos is seen with chelas. Those chelas are among his most characteristic attributes. Though the tail of an eel is represented as his feet in the figures on ceramics, within the scope of the art of mosaic he is represented as a bust and only with the chelas on his head such as this one. His wife Tethys is right by his side and represented with wings upon her forehead. Between them, there is the dragon called Cetos which is a mythological sea creature. As is seen in the coins of Zeugma, the Euphrates River is expressed as a dragon. Besides these two figures, on the top-right of the mosaic, there is a young male figure which is thought to be Pan, the patron of fishermen and shepherds. The fact that Eros figures and Pan which are the side figures are located outward implies that the pool is built to allow walking around. <br />
<br />
The expression of the Oceanos as not an ocean but a river surrounding the world: By that the water, which vapours with the heat of the sun and then gives life to the nature by becoming rain, and which after being used by the nature reaches again the sea via the rivers is expressed. The water becomes aware of itself and its function by that cycle. This phenomenon is represented in the mosaic panel as the diversification of Oc
  • Water storage vessel of Temple I, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Statue of Thetsis - a 2nd century AD Roman statue found in the city of Lavinia, Italy. Thetis (/ˈθɛtɪs/; Ancient Greek: Θέτις, [tʰétis]), is encountered in Greek mythology mostly as a sea nymph or known as the goddess of water, one of the fifty Nereids, daughters of the ancient sea god Nereus. he statue belonged to a set of ten divinities formerly presented in the portico hemicycle of the city. The Albani Collection Inv No. LL 19 (Usual No Ma 2244), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • 2nd century Roman marble torso copy of the statue of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture.  Inv Ma 2184 Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an African Acrobat from early Imperial period excavated from the Villa Patrizi, via Nomentana, Rome, Italy. A young African performs an acrobatic trick very similar to those performed by tribal members from an area of the Nile, the Tentyitae (described by Pliny in Naturalis Historia), where skilled divers dive into the water from the backs of crocodiles. The work is based on a hellenistic original and here has beed adapted for the Roman period as a fountain decoration. The hole in the acrobats mouth is a water spout.  Inv 40009, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Statue of Thetsis - a 2nd century AD Roman statue found in the city of Lavinia, Italy. Thetis is encountered in Greek mythology mostly as a sea nymph or known as the goddess of water, one of the fifty Nereids, daughters of the ancient sea god Nereus. he statue belonged to a set of ten divinities formerly presented in the portico hemicycle of the city. The Albani Collection Inv No. LL 19 (Usual No Ma 2244), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Thetsis - a 2nd century AD Roman statue found in the city of Lavinia, Italy. Thetis (/ˈθɛtɪs/; Ancient Greek: Θέτις, [tʰétis]), is encountered in Greek mythology mostly as a sea nymph or known as the goddess of water, one of the fifty Nereids, daughters of the ancient sea god Nereus. he statue belonged to a set of ten divinities formerly presented in the portico hemicycle of the city. The Albani Collection Inv No. LL 19 (Usual No Ma 2244), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Thetsis - a 2nd century AD Roman statue found in the city of Lavinia, Italy. Thetis (/ˈθɛtɪs/; Ancient Greek: Θέτις, [tʰétis]), is encountered in Greek mythology mostly as a sea nymph or known as the goddess of water, one of the fifty Nereids, daughters of the ancient sea god Nereus. he statue belonged to a set of ten divinities formerly presented in the portico hemicycle of the city. The Albani Collection Inv No. LL 19 (Usual No Ma 2244), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Ruins of the Roman Columned street which was lined with shops & stores. the troughs in the foreground were filled with running  water from the Fountain of the Acropolis. Perge (Perga) archaeological site, Turkey
  • Ruins of the Roman Columned street which was lined with shops & stores. the troughs in the foreground were filled formed a canal with running  water from the Fountain of the Acropolis that ran down the middle of the street. Perge (Perga) archaeological site, Turkey
  • Ruins of the Roman Columned street which was lined with shops & stores. Down the centre of the street runs a canal which was full of running water from the Fountain of the Acropolis in the foreground. Perge (Perga) archaeological site, Turkey
  • Entrance to Mycenae water cisterns for underground water storage. Excavated by the archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann in 1876.  Mycenae UNESCO World Heritage  Archaeological Site, Peloponnese, Greece
  • Entrance to Mycenae water cisterns for underground water storage. Excavated by the archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann in 1876.  Mycenae UNESCO World Heritage  Archaeological Site, Peloponnese, Greece
  • Entrance to Mycenae water cisterns for underground water storage. Excavated by the archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann in 1876.  Mycenae UNESCO World Heritage  Archaeological Site, Peloponnese, Greece
  • Entrance to Mycenae water cisterns for underground water storage. Excavated by the archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann in 1876.  Mycenae UNESCO World Heritage  Archaeological Site, Peloponnese, Greece
  • Ornamental water drinking water tap
  • Minoan  pottery bath tub  larnax decorated with stylised octopuses,  Episkopi-Lerapetra 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.<br />
<br />
To the Greeks, the Underworld was entered by water. As with many other Minoan bathtubs, this one was probably later used as a coffin to convey the deceased across the sea, where marine imagery would be equally appropriate. The two functions of bathtubs, bathing and burial, combine in the story of Agamemnon who, on return from Troy, was murdered by his wife and her lover in a silver bath.
  • Minoan  pottery bath tub larnax decorated with a stylised crocus flower ,  Episkopi-Lerapetra 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.<br />
<br />
To the Greeks, the Underworld was entered by water. As with many other Minoan bathtubs, this one was probably later used as a coffin to convey the deceased across the sea, where marine imagery would be equally appropriate. The two functions of bathtubs, bathing and burial, combine in the story of Agamemnon who, on return from Troy, was murdered by his wife and her lover in a silver bath.
  • Minoan  pottery bath tub larnax decorated with a stylised crocus flower ,  Episkopi-Lerapetra 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.<br />
<br />
To the Greeks, the Underworld was entered by water. As with many other Minoan bathtubs, this one was probably later used as a coffin to convey the deceased across the sea, where marine imagery would be equally appropriate. The two functions of bathtubs, bathing and burial, combine in the story of Agamemnon who, on return from Troy, was murdered by his wife and her lover in a silver bath.
  • Minoan  pottery bath tub  larnax decorated with stylised octopuses,  Episkopi-Lerapetra 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, black background.<br />
<br />
To the Greeks, the Underworld was entered by water. As with many other Minoan bathtubs, this one was probably later used as a coffin to convey the deceased across the sea, where marine imagery would be equally appropriate. The two functions of bathtubs, bathing and burial, combine in the story of Agamemnon who, on return from Troy, was murdered by his wife and her lover in a silver bath.
  • Minoan  pottery bath tub  larnax decorated with stylised octopuses,  Episkopi-Lerapetra 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.<br />
<br />
To the Greeks, the Underworld was entered by water. As with many other Minoan bathtubs, this one was probably later used as a coffin to convey the deceased across the sea, where marine imagery would be equally appropriate. The two functions of bathtubs, bathing and burial, combine in the story of Agamemnon who, on return from Troy, was murdered by his wife and her lover in a silver bath.
  • Minoan  pottery bath tub  larnax decorated with a cow nursing a calf,  Episkopi-Lerapetra 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, black background.<br />
<br />
To the Greeks, the Underworld was entered by water. As with many other Minoan bathtubs, this one was probably later used as a coffin to convey the deceased across the sea, where marine imagery would be equally appropriate. The two functions of bathtubs, bathing and burial, combine in the story of Agamemnon who, on return from Troy, was murdered by his wife and her lover in a silver bath.
  • Minoan  pottery bath tub  larnax decorated with a cow nursing a calf,  Episkopi-Lerapetra 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.<br />
<br />
To the Greeks, the Underworld was entered by water. As with many other Minoan bathtubs, this one was probably later used as a coffin to convey the deceased across the sea, where marine imagery would be equally appropriate. The two functions of bathtubs, bathing and burial, combine in the story of Agamemnon who, on return from Troy, was murdered by his wife and her lover in a silver bath.
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture ”L’Angelo Nocchiero” (the Helmsman Angel). The sculpture depicts an angel, standing astride a small boat, beginning to secure the sails at the end of a journey. His garments are streaming behind him, suggesting a strong wind. The prow of the boat is the stoic face of a woman, and under the prow the water swirls. The Giacomo Carpaneto tomb  sculpted by Giovanni Scanzi in 1886. Section A, no 25, monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba delle Leonesse". A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design. Six painted columns divide the walls to give the tomb the appearance of a pavillion. In the typanium of the back wall are two lionesses below which is a large Krater used to mix water and wine, flanked by two musicians and a female dancer.  Circa 520 BC. Excavated 1874, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Eastern Roman Byzantine walk in baptismal font from the 6th century AD Parish Church of Demna near Kalibia, Cape Bon, Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The baptismal font was removed from the church and restored in the Bardo Museum Tunis in 1955. <br />
<br />
The mosaic iconographic decorations represent the salvation of the neophyte, newcomer, who by being baptised is admitted into the Church of Christ whilst being illuminated by faith, represented the mosaic lit candle illustrations.<br />
<br />
The P with a cross through it is the Chi Rho, a Christian symbol which represent the first two letters of Jesus Christ's name in Greek. The Christogram also has the Greek letters Alpha and Omega which represent the passage from the book of revelations: “I am the Alpha and Omega" Chapter 1 verse 8, which is clarified by "the beginning and the end" (Revelation 21:6, 22:13). <br />
<br />
In these type of baptismal fonts those being baptised would have been fully immersed in water as John the Baptist immersed Jesus. <br />
<br />
The font was paid for by donation by Iuliana and Aquinius who dedicated the font to St Cyprian, the martyed Bishop of Carthage, circa 258,  and the author of a treatise on baptism rites<br />
<br />
The Bardo Museum Tunis
  • Ruins of the Roman Columned street which was lined with shops & stores. the troughs in the foreground were filled with running  water from the Fountain of the Acropolis. Perge (Perga) archaeological site, Turkey
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a protective spirits,  from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room G, door e, panel 1.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 124586
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a protective spirits,  from Nimrud, Iraq. The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding.   865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room G, door e, panel 1.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 124586
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of an eagle headed protective spirit  from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room F, panel 3.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 124584-5
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of an eagle headed  protective spirit holding a symbolic cone and a bucket of holy water.  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace, room F, panel 8.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 118804.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King  Ashurnasirpal II dressed in Ritual robes, he is depicted twice on either side of the central sacred tree of life, flanked by winged protective spirits holding a bucket with holy water which they are sprinking with a symbolic pine cone. Above the tree of life is a winged disc with possible the sun god Shamash in it.  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Room B, panel 23.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124531.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 118921
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 118921
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • The Kaufmann Aphrodite head. 2nd century Roman marble copy modelled on the statue head of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture. Borghese Collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv no MR657 ( Usual No Ma 421)
  • The Kaufmann Aphrodite head. 2nd century Roman marble copy modelled on the statue head of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture. Borghese Collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv no MR657 ( Usual No Ma 421)
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Basilica Cisterns for water storage built in the 6th century during the reign of Byzantine (Eastern Roman)  Emperor Justinian I. Istanbul Turkey
  • Cascades of water running over the travetine deposits between the lakes of Plitvice. Plitvice ( Plitvika ) Lakes National Park, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Cascades of water running over the travetine deposits between the lakes of Plitvice. Plitvice ( Plitvika ) Lakes National Park, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Cascades of water running over the travetine deposits between the lakes of Plitvice. Plitvice ( Plitvika ) Lakes National Park, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Cascades of water running over the travetine deposits between the lakes of Plitvice. Plitvice ( Plitvika ) Lakes National Park, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Cascades of water running over the travetine deposits between the lakes of Plitvice. Plitvice ( Plitvika ) Lakes National Park, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • One of Plitvice mineral water lakes . Plitvice ( Plitvika ) Lakes National Park, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • One of Plitvice mineral water lakes . Plitvice ( Plitvika ) Lakes National Park, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . In the background is the silted up harbour.  Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • At The Fair - Water Splash  - Fine Art Photos & Photography black & white  Prints
  • Medieval Byzantine style mosaics of the Bible story of Rebecca watering the vcamels, Palatine Chapel, Cappella Palatina, Palermo, Italy
  • Medieval Byzantine style mosaics of the Bible story of Rebecca watering the vcamels, Palatine Chapel, Cappella Palatina, Palermo, Italy
  • statue of a tortoise, a symbol of the feminine power of the waters and their godess Aphrodite or Venus, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of a Nymphe, the spirit of the meadows, forest & waters, an early Roman marble sculpture, Ist cent B.C, from Tralles (Aydin) , west Turkey. Istanbul Archaeological museum Cat. Mendel 543.
  • Statue of a Nymphe, the spirit of the meadows, forest & waters, an early Roman marble sculpture, Ist cent B.C, from Tralles (Aydin) , west Turkey. Istanbul Archaeological museum Cat. Mendel 543.
  • Antinous Mondragone, A Roman marble bust from circa 130 AD. Antinous was the young Bithynian favoured by the emperor Hadrian who was deified after drowning under mysterious circumstances in the waters of the Nile circa 130AD. Thanks to the promotion of the cult Antinous portraits can be found throughout the Empire in the places most frequented by Hadrian. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 412 or Ma 1205, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Antinous Mondragone, A Roman marble bust from circa 130 AD. Antinous was the young Bithynian favoured by the emperor Hadrian who was deified after drowning under mysterious circumstances in the waters of the Nile circa 130AD. Thanks to the promotion of the cult Antinous portraits can be found throughout the Empire in the places most frequented by Hadrian. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 412 or Ma 1205, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue known as Antonius as Aristaeus. Antinous was the young Bithynian favoured by the emperor Hadrian who was deified after drowning under mysterious circumstances in the waters of the Nile circa 130AD. Thanks to the promotion of the cult Antinous portraits can be found throughout the Empire in the places most frequented by Hadrian. This statue was part of the collection of ancient sculptors bought in Rome by Cardinal Richelieu (1585-1642) for his chateau in Poitou. The favourite of the Emperor Hadrian (117-138 AD) Antonius  is depicted here as Aristaeus, a minor Greek God of fruit trees and bee keeping. The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 73 or Ma 5781, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue known as Antonius as Aristaeus. Antinous was the young Bithynian favoured by the emperor Hadrian who was deified after drowning under mysterious circumstances in the waters of the Nile circa 130AD. Thanks to the promotion of the cult Antinous portraits can be found throughout the Empire in the places most frequented by Hadrian. This statue was part of the collection of ancient sculptors bought in Rome by Cardinal Richelieu (1585-1642) for his chateau in Poitou. The favourite of the Emperor Hadrian (117-138 AD) Antonius  is depicted here as Aristaeus, a minor Greek God of fruit trees and bee keeping. The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 73 or Ma 5781, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue known as Antonius as Aristaeus. Antinous was the young Bithynian favoured by the emperor Hadrian who was deified after drowning under mysterious circumstances in the waters of the Nile circa 130AD. Thanks to the promotion of the cult Antinous portraits can be found throughout the Empire in the places most frequented by Hadrian. This statue was part of the collection of ancient sculptors bought in Rome by Cardinal Richelieu (1585-1642) for his chateau in Poitou. The favourite of the Emperor Hadrian (117-138 AD) Antonius  is depicted here as Aristaeus, a minor Greek God of fruit trees and bee keeping. The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 73 or Ma 5781, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Bust of Antinous - late Hadrianic period circa 130-138AD. Antinous was the young Bithynian favoured by the emperor Hadrian who was deified after drowning under mysterious circumstances in the waters of the Nile circa 130AD. Thanks to the promotion of the cult Antinous portraits can be found throughout the Empire in the places most frequented by Hadrian. National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Bust of Antinous - late Hadrianic period circa 130-138AD. Antinous was the young Bithynian favoured by the emperor Hadrian who was deified after drowning under mysterious circumstances in the waters of the Nile circa 130AD. Thanks to the promotion of the cult Antinous portraits can be found throughout the Empire in the places most frequented by Hadrian. National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Antinous Mondragone, A Roman marble bust from circa 130 AD. Antinous was the young Bithynian favoured by the emperor Hadrian who was deified after drowning under mysterious circumstances in the waters of the Nile circa 130AD. Thanks to the promotion of the cult Antinous portraits can be found throughout the Empire in the places most frequented by Hadrian. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 412 or Ma 1205, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Antinous Mondragone, A Roman marble bust from circa 130 AD. Antinous was the young Bithynian favoured by the emperor Hadrian who was deified after drowning under mysterious circumstances in the waters of the Nile circa 130AD. Thanks to the promotion of the cult Antinous portraits can be found throughout the Empire in the places most frequented by Hadrian. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 412 or Ma 1205, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue known as Antonius as Aristaeus. Antinous was the young Bithynian favoured by the emperor Hadrian who was deified after drowning under mysterious circumstances in the waters of the Nile circa 130AD. Thanks to the promotion of the cult Antinous portraits can be found throughout the Empire in the places most frequented by Hadrian. This statue was part of the collection of ancient sculptors bought in Rome by Cardinal Richelieu (1585-1642) for his chateau in Poitou. The favourite of the Emperor Hadrian (117-138 AD) Antonius  is depicted here as Aristaeus, a minor Greek God of fruit trees and bee keeping. The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 73 or Ma 5781, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The famous Turquoise waters of Myrtos Beach (??????? ??????), Kefalonia, Greek Ionian Islands

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