• Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. White background<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Grey background.<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Black background<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. White background<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Black background<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Grey background.<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Grey background.<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Grey background.<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Black background<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. White background<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Grey background.<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Grey background.<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. White background<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Black background<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. White background<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Black background<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Grey background.<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Grey background.<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Grey background.<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161, White background<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Black background<br />
<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Grey background.<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Grey background.<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Grey background.<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Grey background.<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. White background<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Black background<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Grey background.<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161, White background<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Black background<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Grey background.<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Early classical ancient Greek bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, circa 450 BC. Athens National Arcjaeological Museum, cat no X15161. Grey background.<br />
<br />
This bronze statue was found in the sea off Cape Artemision in northern Euobea. Zeus or Poseidon is shown making a great stride. His lefy arm is extended forward and his righy arm extends back which would have held a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon. The identification of the statue is controversial though it ios more likely Zeus. <br />
<br />
It is one of the few preserved original statues of Severe Style, notable for the exuisite rendering of motion and anatomy. Iy is certainly the work of a great sculptor of the early ancient Greek Classical period
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Roman statue of Dioscur. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
The statue is one of the twin brothers that together are called the Dioscuri which means sons of the God Zeus. Their names are Castor and Pollux.
  • Roman statue of Dioscur. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
The statue is one of the twin brothers that together are called the Dioscuri which means sons of the God Zeus. Their names are Castor and Pollux.
  • Roman statue of The Three Graces. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 17.29.81. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
The Three Graces iRoamn statue is of the mythological three charites, daughters of Zeus,  Euphrosyne, Aglaea and Thalia , who were said to represent youth/beauty (Thalia), mirth (Euphrosyne), and elegance (Aglaea).
  • Roman statue of Dioscur. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The statue is one of the twin brothers that together are called the Dioscuri which means sons of the God Zeus. Their names are Castor and Pollux.
  • Roman statue of Dioscur. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
The statue is one of the twin brothers that together are called the Dioscuri which means sons of the God Zeus. Their names are Castor and Pollux.
  • Roman statue of Dioscur. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The statue is one of the twin brothers that together are called the Dioscuri which means sons of the God Zeus. Their names are Castor and Pollux.
  • Roman statue of The Three Graces. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 17.29.81. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
The Three Graces iRoamn statue is of the mythological three charites, daughters of Zeus,  Euphrosyne, Aglaea and Thalia , who were said to represent youth/beauty (Thalia), mirth (Euphrosyne), and elegance (Aglaea).
  • Roman statue of The Three Graces. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 17.29.81. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The Three Graces iRoamn statue is of the mythological three charites, daughters of Zeus,  Euphrosyne, Aglaea and Thalia , who were said to represent youth/beauty (Thalia), mirth (Euphrosyne), and elegance (Aglaea).
  • Roman statue of The Three Graces. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 17.29.81. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Three Graces iRoamn statue is of the mythological three charites, daughters of Zeus,  Euphrosyne, Aglaea and Thalia , who were said to represent youth/beauty (Thalia), mirth (Euphrosyne), and elegance (Aglaea).
  • Roman statue of The Three Graces. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 17.29.81. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
The Three Graces iRoamn statue is of the mythological three charites, daughters of Zeus,  Euphrosyne, Aglaea and Thalia , who were said to represent youth/beauty (Thalia), mirth (Euphrosyne), and elegance (Aglaea).  Against a grey background
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Tyche. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Tyche was the presiding tutelary deity who governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. In Classical Greek mythology, she is the daughter of Aphrodite and Zeus or Hermes.
  • Roman statue of Tyche. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Tyche was the presiding tutelary deity who governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. In Classical Greek mythology, she is the daughter of Aphrodite and Zeus or Hermes.
  • Roman statue of Tyche. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Tyche was the presiding tutelary deity who governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. In Classical Greek mythology, she is the daughter of Aphrodite and Zeus or Hermes.
  • Roman statue of Tyche. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Tyche was the presiding tutelary deity who governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. In Classical Greek mythology, she is the daughter of Aphrodite and Zeus or Hermes.
  • Roman statue of Tyche. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Tyche was the presiding tutelary deity who governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. In Classical Greek mythology, she is the daughter of Aphrodite and Zeus or Hermes.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Roman statue of Tyche. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 3062 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
A Tyche; was the presiding tutelary deity who governed the fortune and prosperity of a city; its destiny. In Classical Greek mythology; she is the daughter of Aphrodite and Zeus or Hermes.
  • Roman statue of Tyche. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 3062 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. <br />
<br />
A Tyche; was the presiding tutelary deity who governed the fortune and prosperity of a city; its destiny. In Classical Greek mythology; she is the daughter of Aphrodite and Zeus or Hermes.
  • Roman statue of Tyche. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 3062 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
A Tyche; was the presiding tutelary deity who governed the fortune and prosperity of a city; its destiny. In Classical Greek mythology; she is the daughter of Aphrodite and Zeus or Hermes.
  • Roman statue of Tyche. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 3062 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a black background.<br />
<br />
A Tyche; was the presiding tutelary deity who governed the fortune and prosperity of a city; its destiny. In Classical Greek mythology; she is the daughter of Aphrodite and Zeus or Hermes.
  • Roman statue of Tyche. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 3062 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
A Tyche; was the presiding tutelary deity who governed the fortune and prosperity of a city; its destiny. In Classical Greek mythology; she is the daughter of Aphrodite and Zeus or Hermes.
  • Statue head at sunset of Zeus & Antiocchus behind, in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunset, from left,  Eagle, Antiochus, Commagene, Zeus, Apollo, & Herekles with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.      Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebastian relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.      Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background. <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background. <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.      Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Statue head of Zeus in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head of from left, Zeus, Commagene, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunrise, from right, Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nysa and baby Dionysus Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The nymph Nysa has the baby Dionysus on her lap. He reaches out to a bunch of grapes held up by a satyr, one of his woodland followers. Dionysus was the son of Zeus by Semele, and was given the nymphs of Mt Nysa for an upbringing in the wilds, safe from the eyes of Hera, Zeus’s wife. Nysa was located in the Meander Valley, near Aphrodisias: the story was local.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nysa and baby Dionysus Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The nymph Nysa has the baby Dionysus on her lap. He reaches out to a bunch of grapes held up by a satyr, one of his woodland followers. Dionysus was the son of Zeus by Semele, and was given the nymphs of Mt Nysa for an upbringing in the wilds, safe from the eyes of Hera, Zeus’s wife. Nysa was located in the Meander Valley, near Aphrodisias: the story was local.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nysa and baby Dionysus Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The nymph Nysa has the baby Dionysus on her lap. He reaches out to a bunch of grapes held up by a satyr, one of his woodland followers. Dionysus was the son of Zeus by Semele, and was given the nymphs of Mt Nysa for an upbringing in the wilds, safe from the eyes of Hera, Zeus’s wife. Nysa was located in the Meander Valley, near Aphrodisias: the story was local.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nysa and baby Dionysus Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The nymph Nysa has the baby Dionysus on her lap. He reaches out to a bunch of grapes held up by a satyr, one of his woodland followers. Dionysus was the son of Zeus by Semele, and was given the nymphs of Mt Nysa for an upbringing in the wilds, safe from the eyes of Hera, Zeus’s wife. Nysa was located in the Meander Valley, near Aphrodisias: the story was local.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nysa and baby Dionysus Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The nymph Nysa has the baby Dionysus on her lap. He reaches out to a bunch of grapes held up by a satyr, one of his woodland followers. Dionysus was the son of Zeus by Semele, and was given the nymphs of Mt Nysa for an upbringing in the wilds, safe from the eyes of Hera, Zeus’s wife. Nysa was located in the Meander Valley, near Aphrodisias: the story was local.
  • Statue head of Zeus & Antiocchus behind, in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head of Zeus & Antiochus behind, the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunset, from right, Herekles, Apollo & Zeus, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right, Herekles, Apollo & Zeus, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunset, from right,  Lion, Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from left,  Eagle, Antiochus, Commagene, Zeus, Apollo, & Herekles with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from left,  Eagle, Antiochus, Commagene, Zeus, Apollo, & Herekles with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunset, from left,  Eagle, Antiochus, Commagene, Zeus, Apollo, & Herekles with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunset, from right,  Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right,  Lion, Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right,  Lion, Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from left, Zeus, Apollo,  Herekles Eagle, & Lion with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunset, from right,  Lion, Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right,  Lion, Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from left,  Eagle, Antiochus, Commagene, Zeus, Apollo, & Herekles with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunset, from right,  Lion, Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right,  Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right,  Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunset , from right, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture, Aphrodisias of Dionysus as a baby, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Baby Dionysus is handed from one nymph to another for suckling. A bearded Silenos gestures excitedly. The scene is set at Nysa in the Meander Valley, where Zeus had his gifted child Dionysos, born to him by Semele and brought up in the wilds out of the view of Hera.
  • Statue head of from left, Zeus, Commagene, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture, Aphrodisias of Dionysus as a baby, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Baby Dionysus is handed from one nymph to another for suckling. A bearded Silenos gestures excitedly. The scene is set at Nysa in the Meander Valley, where Zeus had his gifted child Dionysos, born to him by Semele and brought up in the wilds out of the view of Hera.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture, Aphrodisias of Dionysus as a baby, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Baby Dionysus is handed from one nymph to another for suckling. A bearded Silenos gestures excitedly. The scene is set at Nysa in the Meander Valley, where Zeus had his gifted child Dionysos, born to him by Semele and brought up in the wilds out of the view of Hera.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros son of zeus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros son of zeus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros son of zeus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros son of zeus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros son of zeus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture, Aphrodisias of Dionysus as a baby, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.      Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Baby Dionysus is handed from one nymph to another for suckling. A bearded Silenos gestures excitedly. The scene is set at Nysa in the Meander Valley, where Zeus had his gifted child Dionysos, born to him by Semele and brought up in the wilds out of the view of Hera.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture, Aphrodisias of Dionysus as a baby, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Baby Dionysus is handed from one nymph to another for suckling. A bearded Silenos gestures excitedly. The scene is set at Nysa in the Meander Valley, where Zeus had his gifted child Dionysos, born to him by Semele and brought up in the wilds out of the view of Hera.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture, Aphrodisias of Dionysus as a baby, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Baby Dionysus is handed from one nymph to another for suckling. A bearded Silenos gestures excitedly. The scene is set at Nysa in the Meander Valley, where Zeus had his gifted child Dionysos, born to him by Semele and brought up in the wilds out of the view of Hera.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture, Aphrodisias of Dionysus as a baby, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Baby Dionysus is handed from one nymph to another for suckling. A bearded Silenos gestures excitedly. The scene is set at Nysa in the Meander Valley, where Zeus had his gifted child Dionysos, born to him by Semele and brought up in the wilds out of the view of Hera.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture, Aphrodisias of Dionysus as a baby, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Baby Dionysus is handed from one nymph to another for suckling. A bearded Silenos gestures excitedly. The scene is set at Nysa in the Meander Valley, where Zeus had his gifted child Dionysos, born to him by Semele and brought up in the wilds out of the view of Hera.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture, Aphrodisias of Dionysus as a baby, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.      Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Baby Dionysus is handed from one nymph to another for suckling. A bearded Silenos gestures excitedly. The scene is set at Nysa in the Meander Valley, where Zeus had his gifted child Dionysos, born to him by Semele and brought up in the wilds out of the view of Hera.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture, Aphrodisias of Dionysus as a baby, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Baby Dionysus is handed from one nymph to another for suckling. A bearded Silenos gestures excitedly. The scene is set at Nysa in the Meander Valley, where Zeus had his gifted child Dionysos, born to him by Semele and brought up in the wilds out of the view of Hera.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture, Aphrodisias of Dionysus as a baby, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Baby Dionysus is handed from one nymph to another for suckling. A bearded Silenos gestures excitedly. The scene is set at Nysa in the Meander Valley, where Zeus had his gifted child Dionysos, born to him by Semele and brought up in the wilds out of the view of Hera.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture, Aphrodisias of Dionysus as a baby, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Baby Dionysus is handed from one nymph to another for suckling. A bearded Silenos gestures excitedly. The scene is set at Nysa in the Meander Valley, where Zeus had his gifted child Dionysos, born to him by Semele and brought up in the wilds out of the view of Hera.
  • Statue heads, from right, Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right,  Lion, Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle,  62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle,  62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head of from left, Antiochus, Zeus, Commagene, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head of from left, Antiochus, Zeus, Commagene, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head of from left, Zeus, Commagene, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head at sunset of from left, Zeus, Commagene, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head at sunset, from left, Antiochus, Commenge , Zeus, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle, in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head, from left, Antiochus, Commenge , Zeus, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle, in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head, from left, Antiochus, Commenge , Zeus, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle, in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head, from froint, of an eagle, Herakles & Apollo, & Zeus (left), in front of the stone pyramid  62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head, from front, of an eagle, Herakles & Apollo, & Zeus (left), in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunset, from froint, of an eagle, Herakles & Apollo, & Zeus (left), in front of the stone pyramid  62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head, from froint, of an eagle, Herakles & Apollo, & Zeus (left), in front of the stone pyramid  62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head, from froint, of an eagle (or Zeus), Herakles & Apollo (behind) in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Statue head at sunset, from left, Antiochus, Commenge , Zeus, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle, in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head, from left, Antiochus, Commenge & Zeus, in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Relief sculpture called Les Trois Tyches, a Roman relief sculpture circa 160 AD found on the Appia Way, Rome, Italy. A Tyche was the deity of luck or fotune and brought prosperity to a city. She is the daughter of Aphrodite and Zeus or Hermes. From the Borghese Collection  Inv MR 873   (or Ma 590), The Louvre Mueum, Paris
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris

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