• Kayaköy (Kayakoy) or Karmylassos, an abandoned Greek Village 8km from Fethiye in Turkey whose inhabitants left as part of a  population exchange agreement between the Turkish and Greek governments in 1923 after the Greco Turkish War.
  • Kayaköy (Kayakoy) or Karmylassos, an abandoned Greek Village 8km from Fethiye in Turkey whose inhabitants left as part of a  population exchange agreement between the Turkish and Greek governments in 1923 after the Greco Turkish War.
  • Kayaköy (Kayakoy) or Karmylassos, an abandoned Greek Village 8km from Fethiye in Turkey whose inhabitants left as part of a  population exchange agreement between the Turkish and Greek governments in 1923 after the Greco Turkish War.
  • Kayaköy (Kayakoy) or Karmylassos, an abandoned Greek Village 8km from Fethiye in Turkey whose inhabitants left as part of a  population exchange agreement between the Turkish and Greek governments in 1923 after the Greco Turkish War.
  • Kayaköy (Kayakoy) or Karmylassos, an abandoned Greek Village 8km from Fethiye in Turkey whose inhabitants left as part of a  population exchange agreement between the Turkish and Greek governments in 1923 after the Greco Turkish War.
  • Interior of the 17th cent. Orthodox High Church of Kayaköy (Kayakoy) or Karmylassos, an abandoned Greek Village 8km from Fethiye in Turkey whose inhabitants left as part of a  population exchange agreement between the Turkish and Greek governments in 1923 after the Greco Turkish War.
  • Kayaköy (Kayakoy) or Karmylassos, an abandoned Greek Village 8km from Fethiye in Turkey whose inhabitants left as part of a  population exchange agreement between the Turkish and Greek governments in 1923 after the Greco Turkish War.
  • Kayaköy (Kayakoy) or Karmylassos, an abandoned Greek Village 8km from Fethiye in Turkey whose inhabitants left as part of a  population exchange agreement between the Turkish and Greek governments in 1923 after the Greco Turkish War.
  • Kayaköy (Kayakoy) or Karmylassos, an abandoned Greek Village 8km from Fethiye in Turkey whose inhabitants left as part of a  population exchange agreement between the Turkish and Greek governments in 1923 after the Greco Turkish War.
  • Interior of the 17th cent. Orthodox High Church of Kayaköy (Kayakoy) or Karmylassos, an abandoned Greek Village 8km from Fethiye in Turkey whose inhabitants left as part of a  population exchange agreement between the Turkish and Greek governments in 1923 after the Greco Turkish War.
  • Abandoned farm ruins on Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece
  • Kayaköy (Kayakoy) or Karmylassos, an abandoned Greek Village 8km from Fethiye in Turkey whose inhabitants left as part of a  population exchange agreement between the Turkish and Greek governments in 1923 after the Greco Turkish War.
  • Kayaköy (Kayakoy) or Karmylassos, an abandoned Greek Village 8km from Fethiye in Turkey whose inhabitants left as part of a  population exchange agreement between the Turkish and Greek governments in 1923 after the Greco Turkish War.
  • Kayaköy (Kayakoy) or Karmylassos, an abandoned Greek Village 8km from Fethiye in Turkey whose inhabitants left as part of a  population exchange agreement between the Turkish and Greek governments in 1923 after the Greco Turkish War.
  • Kayaköy (Kayakoy) or Karmylassos, an abandoned Greek Village 8km from Fethiye in Turkey whose inhabitants left as part of a  population exchange agreement between the Turkish and Greek governments in 1923 after the Greco Turkish War.
  • Kayaköy (Kayakoy) or Karmylassos, an abandoned Greek Village 8km from Fethiye in Turkey whose inhabitants left as part of a  population exchange agreement between the Turkish and Greek governments in 1923 after the Greco Turkish War.
  • Kayaköy (Kayakoy) or Karmylassos, an abandoned Greek Village 8km from Fethiye in Turkey whose inhabitants left as part of a  population exchange agreement between the Turkish and Greek governments in 1923 after the Greco Turkish War.
  • Kayaköy (Kayakoy) or Karmylassos, an abandoned Greek Village 8km from Fethiye in Turkey whose inhabitants left as part of a  population exchange agreement between the Turkish and Greek governments in 1923 after the Greco Turkish War.
  • Interior of the 17th cent. Orthodox High Church of Kayaköy (Kayakoy) or Karmylassos, an abandoned Greek Village 8km from Fethiye in Turkey whose inhabitants left as part of a  population exchange agreement between the Turkish and Greek governments in 1923 after the Greco Turkish War.
  • Abandoned farm ruins on Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece
  • A Lycian  marble pillar tomb from 480-470 B.C.  Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • A Lycian  marble pillar tomb from 480-470 B.C.  Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • A Lycian  marble pillar tomb from 480-470 B.C.  Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • Old Emery mine on Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Old Emery mine on Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Ampitheatre of Xanthos that has been modified by the Romans with a wall around what would have been the stage to make a pit for Gladitorial & animal events. Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • A Lycian  marble pillar tomb from 480-470 B.C.  Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • Mined Emery rocks on Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • La Nuda Abbandonate, the abandoned nude sleeping nymph statue, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • La Nuda Abbandonate, the abandoned nude sleeping nymph statue, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • La Nuda Abbandonate, the abandoned nude sleeping nymph statue, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Ariadne sleeping a 2nd century AD Marble Roman statue from Italy. The girl is lying asleep on a rock and is a variation of the famous Sleeping Ariadne of the Vatican museum whose composition is reversed. in Greek mythology Ariadne was the daughter of Minos, King of Crete  and his queen Pasiphaë, daughter of Helios . When Thesius was sent to Crete to be sacrificed to the Minateur Ariadne fell in love at first sight, and helped him by giving him a sword and a ball of thread, so that he could find his way out of the Minotaur's labyrinth. She eloped with Theseus after he achieved his goal, and in most accounts of the myth, Theseus abandoned Ariadne sleeping on Naxos, and Dionysus rediscovered and wedded her. This Roman  Sculpture was inspired  by a Greek original of the 2nd century AD. inv MR 311 ( or Ma 340 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Ariadne sleeping a 2nd century AD Marble Roman statue from Italy. The girl is lying asleep on a rock and is a variation of the famous Sleeping Ariadne of the Vatican museum whose composition is reversed. in Greek mythology Ariadne was the daughter of Minos, King of Crete  and his queen Pasiphaë, daughter of Helios . When Thesius was sent to Crete to be sacrificed to the Minateur Ariadne fell in love at first sight, and helped him by giving him a sword and a ball of thread, so that he could find his way out of the Minotaur's labyrinth. She eloped with Theseus after he achieved his goal, and in most accounts of the myth, Theseus abandoned Ariadne sleeping on Naxos, and Dionysus rediscovered and wedded her. This Roman  Sculpture was inspired  by a Greek original of the 2nd century AD. inv MR 311 ( or Ma 340 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Ariadne sleeping a 2nd century AD Marble Roman statue from Italy. The girl is lying asleep on a rock and is a variation of the famous Sleeping Ariadne of the Vatican museum whose composition is reversed. in Greek mythology Ariadne was the daughter of Minos, King of Crete  and his queen Pasiphaë, daughter of Helios . When Thesius was sent to Crete to be sacrificed to the Minateur Ariadne fell in love at first sight, and helped him by giving him a sword and a ball of thread, so that he could find his way out of the Minotaur's labyrinth. She eloped with Theseus after he achieved his goal, and in most accounts of the myth, Theseus abandoned Ariadne sleeping on Naxos, and Dionysus rediscovered and wedded her. This Roman  Sculpture was inspired  by a Greek original of the 2nd century AD. inv MR 311 ( or Ma 340 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Ariadne sleeping a 2nd century AD Marble Roman statue from Italy. The girl is lying asleep on a rock and is a variation of the famous Sleeping Ariadne of the Vatican museum whose composition is reversed. in Greek mythology Ariadne was the daughter of Minos, King of Crete  and his queen Pasiphaë, daughter of Helios . When Thesius was sent to Crete to be sacrificed to the Minateur Ariadne fell in love at first sight, and helped him by giving him a sword and a ball of thread, so that he could find his way out of the Minotaur's labyrinth. She eloped with Theseus after he achieved his goal, and in most accounts of the myth, Theseus abandoned Ariadne sleeping on Naxos, and Dionysus rediscovered and wedded her. This Roman  Sculpture was inspired  by a Greek original of the 2nd century AD. inv MR 311 ( or Ma 340 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Ariadne sleeping a 2nd century AD Marble Roman statue from Italy. The girl is lying asleep on a rock and is a variation of the famous Sleeping Ariadne of the Vatican museum whose composition is reversed. in Greek mythology Ariadne was the daughter of Minos, King of Crete  and his queen Pasiphaë, daughter of Helios . When Thesius was sent to Crete to be sacrificed to the Minateur Ariadne fell in love at first sight, and helped him by giving him a sword and a ball of thread, so that he could find his way out of the Minotaur's labyrinth. She eloped with Theseus after he achieved his goal, and in most accounts of the myth, Theseus abandoned Ariadne sleeping on Naxos, and Dionysus rediscovered and wedded her. This Roman  Sculpture was inspired  by a Greek original of the 2nd century AD. inv MR 311 ( or Ma 340 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Abandoned Synagogue, K?szeg Hungary
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • La Nuda Abbandonate, the abandoned nude sleeping nymph statue, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Ariadne sleeping a 2nd century AD Marble Roman statue from Italy. The girl is lying asleep on a rock and is a variation of the famous Sleeping Ariadne of the Vatican museum whose composition is reversed. in Greek mythology Ariadne was the daughter of Minos, King of Crete  and his queen Pasiphaë, daughter of Helios . When Thesius was sent to Crete to be sacrificed to the Minateur Ariadne fell in love at first sight, and helped him by giving him a sword and a ball of thread, so that he could find his way out of the Minotaur's labyrinth. She eloped with Theseus after he achieved his goal, and in most accounts of the myth, Theseus abandoned Ariadne sleeping on Naxos, and Dionysus rediscovered and wedded her. This Roman  Sculpture was inspired  by a Greek original of the 2nd century AD. inv MR 311 ( or Ma 340 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Ariadne sleeping a 2nd century AD Marble Roman statue from Italy. The girl is lying asleep on a rock and is a variation of the famous Sleeping Ariadne of the Vatican museum whose composition is reversed. in Greek mythology Ariadne was the daughter of Minos, King of Crete  and his queen Pasiphaë, daughter of Helios . When Thesius was sent to Crete to be sacrificed to the Minateur Ariadne fell in love at first sight, and helped him by giving him a sword and a ball of thread, so that he could find his way out of the Minotaur's labyrinth. She eloped with Theseus after he achieved his goal, and in most accounts of the myth, Theseus abandoned Ariadne sleeping on Naxos, and Dionysus rediscovered and wedded her. This Roman  Sculpture was inspired  by a Greek original of the 2nd century AD. inv MR 311 ( or Ma 340 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Ariadne sleeping a 2nd century AD Marble Roman statue from Italy. The girl is lying asleep on a rock and is a variation of the famous Sleeping Ariadne of the Vatican museum whose composition is reversed. in Greek mythology Ariadne was the daughter of Minos, King of Crete  and his queen Pasiphaë, daughter of Helios . When Thesius was sent to Crete to be sacrificed to the Minateur Ariadne fell in love at first sight, and helped him by giving him a sword and a ball of thread, so that he could find his way out of the Minotaur's labyrinth. She eloped with Theseus after he achieved his goal, and in most accounts of the myth, Theseus abandoned Ariadne sleeping on Naxos, and Dionysus rediscovered and wedded her. This Roman  Sculpture was inspired  by a Greek original of the 2nd century AD. inv MR 311 ( or Ma 340 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Ariadne sleeping a 2nd century AD Marble Roman statue from Italy. The girl is lying asleep on a rock and is a variation of the famous Sleeping Ariadne of the Vatican museum whose composition is reversed. in Greek mythology Ariadne was the daughter of Minos, King of Crete  and his queen Pasiphaë, daughter of Helios . When Thesius was sent to Crete to be sacrificed to the Minateur Ariadne fell in love at first sight, and helped him by giving him a sword and a ball of thread, so that he could find his way out of the Minotaur's labyrinth. She eloped with Theseus after he achieved his goal, and in most accounts of the myth, Theseus abandoned Ariadne sleeping on Naxos, and Dionysus rediscovered and wedded her. This Roman  Sculpture was inspired  by a Greek original of the 2nd century AD. inv MR 311 ( or Ma 340 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Ariadne sleeping a 2nd century AD Marble Roman statue from Italy. The girl is lying asleep on a rock and is a variation of the famous Sleeping Ariadne of the Vatican museum whose composition is reversed. in Greek mythology Ariadne was the daughter of Minos, King of Crete  and his queen Pasiphaë, daughter of Helios . When Thesius was sent to Crete to be sacrificed to the Minateur Ariadne fell in love at first sight, and helped him by giving him a sword and a ball of thread, so that he could find his way out of the Minotaur's labyrinth. She eloped with Theseus after he achieved his goal, and in most accounts of the myth, Theseus abandoned Ariadne sleeping on Naxos, and Dionysus rediscovered and wedded her. This Roman  Sculpture was inspired  by a Greek original of the 2nd century AD. inv MR 311 ( or Ma 340 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Roman fresco wall painting of Ariadne fast asleep on a bed of seaweed does not realise that Theseus is about to abandon her and sailaway on a ship to Athens, Pompeii House of colored Capitals, VII,31-51, inv 9052 , Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Roman fresco wall painting of Ariadne fast asleep on a bed of seaweed does not realise that Theseus is about to abandon her and sailaway on a ship to Athens, Pompeii House of colored Capitals, VII,31-51, inv 9052 , Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the life of Eustace . Central panel shows act 2 ?the Tragedy and Exile? , central diamond - After various disasters, Eustace and his family abandon their home. Top Right - possibly Eustace negotiating passage to Egypt , top right - Eustace and his family board a boat to Egypt.  Bottom left from act one ?the Conversion:?- Placidus hears the words of Christ coming from the mouth of a stag, right - Placidus is baptised and given the name 'Eustace'. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the life of Eustace . Central panel shows act 2 ?the Tragedy and Exile? , central diamond - After various disasters, Eustace and his family abandon their home. Top Right - possibly Eustace negotiating passage to Egypt , top right - Eustace and his family board a boat to Egypt.  Bottom left from act one ?the Conversion:?- Placidus hears the words of Christ coming from the mouth of a stag, right - Placidus is baptised and given the name 'Eustace'. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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