• Garlic and coriander Indian Naan Bread food stock pictures, photos fotos & images
  • Peshwari naan bread
  • Fresh cut red cabbage
  • Corriander and Garlic Indian Naan bread
  • Fresh whole Curly Cabbage
  • Fresh whole Curly Cabbage
  • Fresh whole Curly Cabbage
  • Peshwari Naan. coconut sultanas and honey Bread - Indian Cuisine food stock pictures, photos fotos & images
  • Garlic and coriander Indian Naan Bread food stock pictures, photos fotos & images
  • Garlic and coriander Indian Naan Bread food stock pictures, photos fotos & images
  • Garlic and coriander Indian Naan Bread food stock pictures, photos fotos & images
  • Garlic and coriander Indian Naan Bread food stock pictures, photos fotos & images
  • Savoy Cabbage  market France
  • Savoy Cabbage  market France
  • Top shot of shredded red cabbage and apple salad on a grey leaf plate
  • Fresh cut red cabbage
  • Fresh whole Curly Cabbage
  • Fresh cut red cabbage
  • Fresh whole Curly Cabbage
  • Fresh whole Curly Cabbage
  • Whole and cut Savoy cabbage
  • Whole and cut Savoy cabbage
  • Garlic and coriander Indian Naan Bread food stock pictures, photos fotos & images
  • Peshwari Naan. coconut sultanas and honey Bread - Indian food stock pictures, photos fotos & images
  • Peshwari Naan. coconut sultanas and honey Bread - Indian Cuisine food stock pictures, photos fotos & images
  • Peshwari Naan. coconut sultanas and honey Bread - Indian Cuisine food stock pictures, photos fotos & images
  • Garlic and coriander Indian Naan Bread food stock pictures, photos fotos & images
  • Peshwari Naan. coconut sultanas and honey Bread - Indian Cuisine food stock pictures, photos fotos & images
  • Fresh whole Curly Cabbage
  • Peshwari Naan. coconut sultanas and honey Bread - Indian Cuisine food stock pictures, photos fotos & images
  • Garlic and coriander Indian Naan Bread food stock pictures, photos fotos & images
  • Garlic and coriander Indian Naan Bread food stock pictures, photos fotos & images
  • Garlic and coriander Indian Naan Bread food stock pictures, photos fotos & images
  • Peshwari Naan. coconut sultanas and honey Bread - Indian Cuisine food stock pictures, photos fotos & images
  • Garlic and coriander Indian Naan Bread food stock pictures, photos fotos & images
  • Painted colour verion of Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Painted colour verion of Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Painted colour verion of Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Painted colour verion of Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Painted colour verion of Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Detail of the Roman fresco wall painting of a Dionysus accompanied by Silenius and two cupids finds Ariadne in a deep sleep, he takes her to Olympus and marries her so giving her immortality ,Pompeii House of the Tragic Poet, inv 9271, Naples National Archaeological Museum,
  • Painted alabaster statue of the Virgin of the annunciation, made around 1495 by Tilman Riemenschneider of Heiligenstadt im Eichsfeld, Germany The statue would have originally bee accompanied by another of the  Gabriel and both would have formed part of an altarpiece. Inv RF 1384,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Poseidon and Amphitrite,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The two god-like tritons, Poseidon and Amphitrite, are seated on two sea horses accompanied by two fish legged tritons below. Between the tritons sits a sea-putto of baby triton. The male god is in the form of Poseidon crowned by his wife Amphitrite. Unusually he wears a military cloak and they might be an emperor and his wife (such as Claudius and Agrippina) in the guise of Poseidon and Amphitrite
  • Photo of the Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • The Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • Gothic Altarpiece of Madonna and Child enthroned with angels byPero di Giovanni known as "Lorenzo Monaco" of Sienna and Florence, circa 1415-1420, tempera and gold leaf on wood. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC 212808.<br />
<br />
The Virgin Mary is seated with the child standing on her lap, in an attitude of blessing, accompanied by angels with incentives. The composition is very simple and fuses Sienese and Florentine pictorial traditions in the style of Lorenzo Monaco, monk of the convent of Santa Maria degli Angeli in Florence and the last representative of the style of Giotto before the Renaissance revival of Fra Angelico.
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • Roman mosaic depicting Dionysus repelling pirates from his ship.  He is accompanied by Acoetes, the helmsman and his tutor Silenus, right. Dionysus, in the form a panther, centre,  is repelling pirates from his ship who turn into dolphins as they jump overboard . Dated from the reign of Emperor Gallienus, 260-280 AD from the the house of Dionysus and Ulysses, Dougga. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Inv 2884B Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting Dionysus repelling pirates from his ship.  He is accompanied by Acoetes, the helmsman and his tutor Silenus, right. Dionysus, in the form a panther, centre,  is repelling pirates from his ship who turn into dolphins as they jump overboard . Dated from the reign of Emperor Gallienus, 260-280 AD from the the house of Dionysus and Ulysses, Dougga. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Inv 2884B Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Painted alabaster statue of the Virgin of the annunciation, made around 1495 by Tilman Riemenschneider of Heiligenstadt im Eichsfeld, Germany The statue would have originally bee accompanied by another of the  Gabriel and both would have formed part of an altarpiece. Inv RF 1384,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Painted alabaster statue of the Virgin of the annunciation, made around 1495 by Tilman Riemenschneider of Heiligenstadt im Eichsfeld, Germany The statue would have originally bee accompanied by another of the  Gabriel and both would have formed part of an altarpiece. Inv RF 1384,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Artimis and Doe also known as the Diana of Versailles. A 1st- 2nd century Imperial Roman marble statue of the Greek Goddess Artimis ( Roman Diana) copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  Louvre Mueum, Paris. Cat No MA 589<br />
The slightly over life size Diana (goddess of the hunt)  is accompanied by a under life size doe with antlers. She wears a short Dorian chiton, a himation around her waist, and sandals. She is looking to the right and with her right hand is starting to take an arrow out of a quiver on her back. The bow used to be in her left hand which is holding the deers antlers and part of it can be seen in this hand. This was a popular statue with replicas being found at Leptis Magna (Libya) and at Antalya (Turkey).
  • Artimis and Doe also known as the Diana of Versailles. A 1st- 2nd century Imperial Roman marble statue of the Greek Goddess Artimis ( Roman Diana) copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  Louvre Mueum, Paris. Cat No MA 589<br />
The slightly over life size Diana (goddess of the hunt)  is accompanied by a under life size doe with antlers. She wears a short Dorian chiton, a himation around her waist, and sandals. She is looking to the right and with her right hand is starting to take an arrow out of a quiver on her back. The bow used to be in her left hand which is holding the deers antlers and part of it can be seen in this hand. This was a popular statue with replicas being found at Leptis Magna (Libya) and at Antalya (Turkey).
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Poseidon and Amphitrite,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The two god-like tritons, Poseidon and Amphitrite, are seated on two sea horses accompanied by two fish legged tritons below. Between the tritons sits a sea-putto of baby triton. The male god is in the form of Poseidon crowned by his wife Amphitrite. Unusually he wears a military cloak and they might be an emperor and his wife (such as Claudius and Agrippina) in the guise of Poseidon and Amphitrite
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Poseidon and Amphitrite,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The two god-like tritons, Poseidon and Amphitrite, are seated on two sea horses accompanied by two fish legged tritons below. Between the tritons sits a sea-putto of baby triton. The male god is in the form of Poseidon crowned by his wife Amphitrite. Unusually he wears a military cloak and they might be an emperor and his wife (such as Claudius and Agrippina) in the guise of Poseidon and Amphitrite
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Poseidon and Amphitrite,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The two god-like tritons, Poseidon and Amphitrite, are seated on two sea horses accompanied by two fish legged tritons below. Between the tritons sits a sea-putto of baby triton. The male god is in the form of Poseidon crowned by his wife Amphitrite. Unusually he wears a military cloak and they might be an emperor and his wife (such as Claudius and Agrippina) in the guise of Poseidon and Amphitrite
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Poseidon and Amphitrite,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The two god-like tritons, Poseidon and Amphitrite, are seated on two sea horses accompanied by two fish legged tritons below. Between the tritons sits a sea-putto of baby triton. The male god is in the form of Poseidon crowned by his wife Amphitrite. Unusually he wears a military cloak and they might be an emperor and his wife (such as Claudius and Agrippina) in the guise of Poseidon and Amphitrite
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the Trapedoizal Vestibule room, the so called Domina of the Villa, probably Eutropia the wife of Emperor Maximinianus, accompanied by her children, room no 16 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Trapedoizal Vestibule was probably a private entrance to the Villa Romana del Casale. The Roman mosaics of the Trapedoizal Vestibule depicts the Domina (mistress) of the house, wife of Emperor Maximianus, Eutropia at  its centre. To her right if Maxentius and to her left is Fausta
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the Trapedoizal Vestibule room, the so called Domina of the Villa, probably Eutropia the wife of Emperor Maximinianus, accompanied by her children, room no 16 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Trapedoizal Vestibule was probably a private entrance to the Villa Romana del Casale. The Roman mosaics of the Trapedoizal Vestibule depicts the Domina (mistress) of the house, wife of Emperor Maximianus, Eutropia at  its centre. To her right if Maxentius and to her left is Fausta
  • Image of the Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • The Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a gray background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • Picture of the Hittite Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a grey art background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • The Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a brown art background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • Close up of the Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • Fifth century AD Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian  funerary mosaic of of a little girl The fragmentary inscription is at the top: (name of the deceased) who lived 4 years 11 months, 3 days 7 hours. The deceased is featured in a praying attitude, wearing an embroidered dalmatic. A monogrammed cross and a lit candle accompany the funerary idealised portrait. <br />
Christian necropolis of the Mezghani mounds in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis  (present day Sfax, Tunisia) Fifth c. A.D. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Detail of a fifth century AD Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian  funerary mosaic of of a little girl The fragmentary inscription is at the top: (name of the deceased) who lived 4 years 11 months, 3 days 7 hours. The deceased is featured in a praying attitude, wearing an embroidered dalmatic. A monogrammed cross and a lit candle accompany the funerary idealised portrait. <br />
Christian necropolis of the Mezghani mounds in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis  (present day Sfax, Tunisia) Fifth c. A.D. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • Fifth century AD Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian  funerary mosaic of of a little girl The fragmentary inscription is at the top: (name of the deceased) who lived 4 years 11 months, 3 days 7 hours. The deceased is featured in a praying attitude, wearing an embroidered dalmatic. A monogrammed cross and a lit candle accompany the funerary idealised portrait. <br />
Christian necropolis of the Mezghani mounds in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis  (present day Sfax, Tunisia) Fifth c. A.D. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Fifth century AD Roman Christian  funerary mosaic of of a little girl The fragmentary inscription is at the top: (name of the deceased) who lived 4 years 11 months, 3 days 7 hours. The deceased is featured in a praying attitude, wearing an embroidered dalmatic. A monogrammed cross and a lit candle accompany the funerary idealised portrait. <br />
Christian necropolis of the Mezghani mounds in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis  (present day Sfax, Tunisia) Fifth c. A.D. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Fifth century AD Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian  funerary mosaic of of a little girl The fragmentary inscription is at the top: (name of the deceased) who lived 4 years 11 months, 3 days 7 hours. The deceased is featured in a praying attitude, wearing an embroidered dalmatic. A monogrammed cross and a lit candle accompany the funerary idealised portrait. <br />
Christian necropolis of the Mezghani mounds in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis  (present day Sfax, Tunisia) Fifth c. A.D. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • Fifth century AD Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian  funerary mosaic of of a little girl The fragmentary inscription is at the top: (name of the deceased) who lived 4 years 11 months, 3 days 7 hours. The deceased is featured in a praying attitude, wearing an embroidered dalmatic. A monogrammed cross and a lit candle accompany the funerary idealised portrait. <br />
Christian necropolis of the Mezghani mounds in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis  (present day Sfax, Tunisia) Fifth c. A.D. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • Late 4th century AD Roman mosaic panel of  Venus, Aphrodite, on a boat crowning herself accompanied by six dwarfs. From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • Late 4th century AD Roman mosaic panel of  Venus, Aphrodite, on a boat crowning herself accompanied by six dwarfs. From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • Late 4th century AD Roman mosaic panel of  Venus, Aphrodite, on a boat crowning herself accompanied by six dwarfs. From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • Late 4th century AD Roman mosaic panel of  Venus, Aphrodite, on a boat crowning herself accompanied by six dwarfs. From Cathage, Tunisia.  The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia Grey background
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • 4th century Roman mosaic panel of the Goddess Venus from Ulules (Elles), Tunisia. Venus of Aphrodite is accompanied by 2 female centaurs, half women half horse creatures, known as Am(azoniu) and Titonius. The are crowning Venus The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • Roman mosaic depicting Dionysus repelling pirates from his ship.  He is accompanied by Acoetes, the helmsman and his tutor Silenus, right. Dionysus, in the form a panther, centre,  is repelling pirates from his ship who turn into dolphins as they jump overboard . Dated from the reign of Emperor Gallienus, 260-280 AD from the the house of Dionysus and Ulysses, Dougga. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Inv 2884B Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • The so called Domina of the Villa, probably Eutropia the wife of Emperor Maximinianus, accompanied by her children from the Trapedoizal Vestibule room no 16. Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed  in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. . MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. . MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. . MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. . MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. . MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Painted alabaster statue of the Virgin of the annunciation, made around 1495 by Tilman Riemenschneider of Heiligenstadt im Eichsfeld, Germany The statue would have originally bee accompanied by another of the  Gabriel and both would have formed part of an altarpiece. Inv RF 1384,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted alabaster statue of the Virgin of the annunciation, made around 1495 by Tilman Riemenschneider of Heiligenstadt im Eichsfeld, Germany The statue would have originally bee accompanied by another of the  Gabriel and both would have formed part of an altarpiece. Inv RF 1384,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted alabaster statue of the Virgin of the annunciation, made around 1495 by Tilman Riemenschneider of Heiligenstadt im Eichsfeld, Germany The statue would have originally bee accompanied by another of the  Gabriel and both would have formed part of an altarpiece. Inv RF 1384,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD.Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death.. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death.. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Painted alabaster statue of the Virgin of the annunciation, made around 1495 by Tilman Riemenschneider of Heiligenstadt im Eichsfeld, Germany The statue would have originally bee accompanied by another of the  Gabriel and both would have formed part of an altarpiece. Inv RF 1384,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted alabaster statue of the Virgin of the annunciation, made around 1495 by Tilman Riemenschneider of Heiligenstadt im Eichsfeld, Germany The statue would have originally bee accompanied by another of the  Gabriel and both would have formed part of an altarpiece. Inv RF 1384,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted alabaster statue of the Virgin of the annunciation, made around 1495 by Tilman Riemenschneider of Heiligenstadt im Eichsfeld, Germany The statue would have originally bee accompanied by another of the  Gabriel and both would have formed part of an altarpiece. Inv RF 1384,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted alabaster statue of the Virgin of the annunciation, made around 1495 by Tilman Riemenschneider of Heiligenstadt im Eichsfeld, Germany The statue would have originally bee accompanied by another of the  Gabriel and both would have formed part of an altarpiece. Inv RF 1384,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • The Roman Sculpture Venus of Italica or Diosa Venus, found in 1940 near the theatre.  A famous Roman statue,  the "Venus of Itálica", dates from the time of Hadrian (117-138 A.D.). Unlike the other Venus statues of the Era the Venus of Itálica does not try to hide her nudity but rather displays it. The state has rounded proportions with clearly defined anatomical features thanks to the exquisitely skilled carving, and the excellent quality of the marble. She is shown accompanied by a dolphin, and has a colocasia leaf in her left hand. <br />
Archaeological Museum, Seville, Spain<br />
<br />
Against a Grey background
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Artimis and Doe also known as the Diana of Versailles. A 1st- 2nd century Imperial Roman marble statue of the Greek Goddess Artimis ( Roman Diana) copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  Louvre Mueum, Paris. Cat No MA 589<br />
The slightly over life size Diana (goddess of the hunt)  is accompanied by a under life size doe with antlers. She wears a short Dorian chiton, a himation around her waist, and sandals. She is looking to the right and with her right hand is starting to take an arrow out of a quiver on her back. The bow used to be in her left hand which is holding the deers antlers and part of it can be seen in this hand. This was a popular statue with replicas being found at Leptis Magna (Libya) and at Antalya (Turkey).
  • Artimis and Doe also known as the Diana of Versailles. A 1st- 2nd century Imperial Roman marble statue of the Greek Goddess Artimis ( Roman Diana) copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  Louvre Mueum, Paris. Cat No MA 589<br />
The slightly over life size Diana (goddess of the hunt)  is accompanied by a under life size doe with antlers. She wears a short Dorian chiton, a himation around her waist, and sandals. She is looking to the right and with her right hand is starting to take an arrow out of a quiver on her back. The bow used to be in her left hand which is holding the deers antlers and part of it can be seen in this hand. This was a popular statue with replicas being found at Leptis Magna (Libya) and at Antalya (Turkey).

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