• The Hungarian National Theatre, Budapest Hungary
  • The Hungarian National Theatre, Budapest Hungary
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  Three of the four compartments of the small altar front are dedicated to San Michael.  Top right shows Michael fighting a dragon, bottom left shows the psychostasia, where souls are weighed to determine whether they should go to heaven or hell on judgement day, bottom right shows a detail of the story of the miracle of Mont Gargano. Top left shows Grabriel and Rafael with the baby Jesus. The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  Three of the four compartments of the small altar front are dedicated to San Michael.  Top right shows Michael fighting a dragon, bottom left shows the psychostasia, where souls are weighed to determine whether they should go to heaven or hell on judgement day, bottom right shows a detail of the story of the miracle of Mont Gargano. Top left shows Grabriel and Rafael with the baby Jesus. The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  This panel shows the psychostasia, where souls are weighed to determine whether they should go to heaven or hell on judgement day.  The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  This panel shows Archangel Michael fighting a dragon. The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  This panel  shows a detail of the story of the miracle of Mont Gargano. Top left shows Grabriel and Rafael with the baby Jesus. The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  Three of the four compartments of the small altar front are dedicated to San Michael.  Top right shows Michael fighting a dragon, bottom left shows the psychostasia, where souls are weighed to determine whether they should go to heaven or hell on judgement day, bottom right shows a detail of the story of the miracle of Mont Gargano. Top left shows Grabriel and Rafael with the baby Jesus. The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  Three of the four compartments of the small altar front are dedicated to San Michael.  Top right shows Michael fighting a dragon, bottom left shows the psychostasia, where souls are weighed to determine whether they should go to heaven or hell on judgement day, bottom right shows a detail of the story of the miracle of Mont Gargano. Top left shows Grabriel and Rafael with the baby Jesus. The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  Three of the four compartments of the small altar front are dedicated to San Michael.  Top right shows Michael fighting a dragon, bottom left shows the psychostasia, where souls are weighed to determine whether they should go to heaven or hell on judgement day, bottom right shows a detail of the story of the miracle of Mont Gargano. Top left shows Grabriel and Rafael with the baby Jesus. The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  Three of the four compartments of the small altar front are dedicated to San Michael.  Top right shows Michael fighting a dragon, bottom left shows the psychostasia, where souls are weighed to determine whether they should go to heaven or hell on judgement day, bottom right shows a detail of the story of the miracle of Mont Gargano. Top left shows Grabriel and Rafael with the baby Jesus. The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  Three of the four compartments of the small altar front are dedicated to San Michael.  Top right shows Michael fighting a dragon, bottom left shows the psychostasia, where souls are weighed to determine whether they should go to heaven or hell on judgement day, bottom right shows a detail of the story of the miracle of Mont Gargano. Top left shows Grabriel and Rafael with the baby Jesus. The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  This panel  shows a detail of the story of the miracle of Mont Gargano. Top left shows Grabriel and Rafael with the baby Jesus. The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  This panel shows Archangel Michael fighting a dragon. The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  Three of the four compartments of the small altar front are dedicated to San Michael.  Top right shows Michael fighting a dragon, bottom left shows the psychostasia, where souls are weighed to determine whether they should go to heaven or hell on judgement day, bottom right shows a detail of the story of the miracle of Mont Gargano. Top left shows Grabriel and Rafael with the baby Jesus. The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  Three of the four compartments of the small altar front are dedicated to San Michael.  Top right shows Michael fighting a dragon, bottom left shows the psychostasia, where souls are weighed to determine whether they should go to heaven or hell on judgement day, bottom right shows a detail of the story of the miracle of Mont Gargano. Top left shows Grabriel and Rafael with the baby Jesus. The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  Three of the four compartments of the small altar front are dedicated to San Michael.  Top right shows Michael fighting a dragon, bottom left shows the psychostasia, where souls are weighed to determine whether they should go to heaven or hell on judgement day, bottom right shows a detail of the story of the miracle of Mont Gargano. Top left shows Grabriel and Rafael with the baby Jesus. The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  This panel shows the psychostasia, where souls are weighed to determine whether they should go to heaven or hell on judgement day.  The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  Three of the four compartments of the small altar front are dedicated to San Michael.  Top right shows Michael fighting a dragon, bottom left shows the psychostasia, where souls are weighed to determine whether they should go to heaven or hell on judgement day, bottom right shows a detail of the story of the miracle of Mont Gargano. Top left shows Grabriel and Rafael with the baby Jesus. The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  This panel  shows a detail of the story of the miracle of Mont Gargano. Top left shows Grabriel and Rafael with the baby Jesus. The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture, an allegory of an athletic contest [ Agon ]  Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The pillar with a bearded head on it is Hermes the god of the gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victiry with a ribbon on a prize table. Two winged baby Eros figures are stuggling over a palm branch acting out the idea of a contest. The youthful figure is Agon himself who holds a palm of victory
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture, an allegory of an athletic contest [ Agon ]  Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The pillar with a bearded head on it is Hermes the god of the gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victiry with a ribbon on a prize table. Two winged baby Eros figures are stuggling over a palm branch acting out the idea of a contest. The youthful figure is Agon himself who holds a palm of victory
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture, an allegory of an athletic contest [ Agon ]  Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The pillar with a bearded head on it is Hermes the god of the gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victiry with a ribbon on a prize table. Two winged baby Eros figures are stuggling over a palm branch acting out the idea of a contest. The youthful figure is Agon himself who holds a palm of victory
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  Three of the four compartments of the small altar front are dedicated to San Michael.  Top right shows Michael fighting a dragon, bottom left shows the psychostasia, where souls are weighed to determine whether they should go to heaven or hell on judgement day, bottom right shows a detail of the story of the miracle of Mont Gargano. Top left shows Grabriel and Rafael with the baby Jesus. The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  Three of the four compartments of the small altar front are dedicated to San Michael.  Top right shows Michael fighting a dragon, bottom left shows the psychostasia, where souls are weighed to determine whether they should go to heaven or hell on judgement day, bottom right shows a detail of the story of the miracle of Mont Gargano. Top left shows Grabriel and Rafael with the baby Jesus. The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  This panel shows the psychostasia, where souls are weighed to determine whether they should go to heaven or hell on judgement day.  The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  Three of the four compartments of the small altar front are dedicated to San Michael.  Top right shows Michael fighting a dragon, bottom left shows the psychostasia, where souls are weighed to determine whether they should go to heaven or hell on judgement day, bottom right shows a detail of the story of the miracle of Mont Gargano. Top left shows Grabriel and Rafael with the baby Jesus. The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  Three of the four compartments of the small altar front are dedicated to San Michael.  Top right shows Michael fighting a dragon, bottom left shows the psychostasia, where souls are weighed to determine whether they should go to heaven or hell on judgement day, bottom right shows a detail of the story of the miracle of Mont Gargano. Top left shows Grabriel and Rafael with the baby Jesus. The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Altar of Archangels<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century<br />
Temple, stucco reliefs in metal on wood from the church of Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3913<br />
<br />
Archangels were prominent in Romanesque iconography, acting as intermediaries between God and Man or as agents of divine will.  This panel shows Archangel Michael fighting a dragon. The style of the painting is the similar to the mural decoration of St. Paul Casserres.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture, an allegory of an athletic contest [ Agon ]  Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The pillar with a bearded head on it is Hermes the god of the gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victiry with a ribbon on a prize table. Two winged baby Eros figures are stuggling over a palm branch acting out the idea of a contest. The youthful figure is Agon himself who holds a palm of victory
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture, an allegory of an athletic contest [ Agon ]  Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The pillar with a bearded head on it is Hermes the god of the gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victiry with a ribbon on a prize table. Two winged baby Eros figures are stuggling over a palm branch acting out the idea of a contest. The youthful figure is Agon himself who holds a palm of victory
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture, an allegory of an athletic contest [ Agon ]  Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The pillar with a bearded head on it is Hermes the god of the gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victiry with a ribbon on a prize table. Two winged baby Eros figures are stuggling over a palm branch acting out the idea of a contest. The youthful figure is Agon himself who holds a palm of victory
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture, an allegory of an athletic contest [ Agon ]  Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The pillar with a bearded head on it is Hermes the god of the gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victiry with a ribbon on a prize table. Two winged baby Eros figures are stuggling over a palm branch acting out the idea of a contest. The youthful figure is Agon himself who holds a palm of victory
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the life of Eustace . Central panel shows act 2 ?the Tragedy and Exile? , central diamond - After various disasters, Eustace and his family abandon their home. Top Right - possibly Eustace negotiating passage to Egypt , top right - Eustace and his family board a boat to Egypt.  Bottom left from act one ?the Conversion:?- Placidus hears the words of Christ coming from the mouth of a stag, right - Placidus is baptised and given the name 'Eustace'. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the life of Eustace . Central panel shows act 2 ?the Tragedy and Exile? , central diamond - After various disasters, Eustace and his family abandon their home. Top Right - possibly Eustace negotiating passage to Egypt , top right - Eustace and his family board a boat to Egypt.  Bottom left from act one ?the Conversion:?- Placidus hears the words of Christ coming from the mouth of a stag, right - Placidus is baptised and given the name 'Eustace'. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Ancient Egyptian Cat Sarcophagus conating cat mummy, Late to Plolomaic Period, (722-30 BC), Egyptian Museum, Turin.Old Fund Cat 2361. white background<br />
<br />
Animal mummification was common in ancient Egypt. They mummified various animals. It was an enormous part of Egyptian culture, not only in their role as food and pets, but also for religious reasons. They were typically mummified for four main purposes—to allow beloved pets to go on to the afterlife, to provide food in the afterlife, to act as offerings to a particular god, and because some were seen as physical manifestations of specific deities that the Egyptians worshipped. Bast, the cat goddess is an example of one such deity.
  • Ancient Egyptian Cat Sarcophagus conating cat mummy, Late to Plolomaic Period, (722-30 BC), Egyptian Museum, Turin.Old Fund Cat 2361. Grey background. <br />
<br />
Animal mummification was common in ancient Egypt. They mummified various animals. It was an enormous part of Egyptian culture, not only in their role as food and pets, but also for religious reasons. They were typically mummified for four main purposes—to allow beloved pets to go on to the afterlife, to provide food in the afterlife, to act as offerings to a particular god, and because some were seen as physical manifestations of specific deities that the Egyptians worshipped. Bast, the cat goddess is an example of one such deity.
  • Anciient Egyptian Book of the Dead papyrus - Spell 30 for stopping the heart betraying the deceased at the tribunal of Osiris, Iufankh's Book of the Dead, Ptolemai period (332-30BC).Turin Egyptian Museum. Grey Background<br />
<br />
the spell reads ' Stand not against me as a witness, oppose me not in the Council, act not against me before the gods, outweigh me not before the great God, the Lord os the West"<br />
<br />
The translation of  Iuefankh's Book of the Dead papyrus by Richard Lepsius marked a truning point in the studies of ancient Egyptian funereal studies.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Picture and image of the Realistic blind man stone funary monument sculpture commissioned by Enrico Amerigo for his sisters memory. beside the pedestal on which the sculptor set the deceased’s bust he placed, on the left, the figure of an old blind man, kneeling down and leaning on a stick; on the right he placed the figure of a young orphan girl, recognizable as such by her kindergarten uniform, portrayed in the act of making the sign of the cross. This work belongs to the Realism, a trend which was typical during the 1880s and 1890s, according to which the orphans, the poor, the sick and all those who benefited from somebody’s generosity had to be portrayed in a concrete fashion. Sculptor G Moreno 1890. Section A, no 53, The Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Ancient Egyptian Cat Sarcophagus conating cat mummy, Late to Plolomaic Period, (722-30 BC), Egyptian Museum, Turin.Old Fund Cat 2361. black background<br />
<br />
Animal mummification was common in ancient Egypt. They mummified various animals. It was an enormous part of Egyptian culture, not only in their role as food and pets, but also for religious reasons. They were typically mummified for four main purposes—to allow beloved pets to go on to the afterlife, to provide food in the afterlife, to act as offerings to a particular god, and because some were seen as physical manifestations of specific deities that the Egyptians worshipped. Bast, the cat goddess is an example of one such deity.
  • Ancient Egyptian Cat Sarcophagus conating cat mummy, Late to Plolomaic Period, (722-30 BC), Egyptian Museum, Turin.Old Fund Cat 2361. Grey background. <br />
<br />
Animal mummification was common in ancient Egypt. They mummified various animals. It was an enormous part of Egyptian culture, not only in their role as food and pets, but also for religious reasons. They were typically mummified for four main purposes—to allow beloved pets to go on to the afterlife, to provide food in the afterlife, to act as offerings to a particular god, and because some were seen as physical manifestations of specific deities that the Egyptians worshipped. Bast, the cat goddess is an example of one such deity.
  • Ancient Egyptian Cat Sarcophagus conating cat mummy, Late to Plolomaic Period, (722-30 BC), Egyptian Museum, Turin.Old Fund Cat 2361.<br />
<br />
Animal mummification was common in ancient Egypt. They mummified various animals. It was an enormous part of Egyptian culture, not only in their role as food and pets, but also for religious reasons. They were typically mummified for four main purposes—to allow beloved pets to go on to the afterlife, to provide food in the afterlife, to act as offerings to a particular god, and because some were seen as physical manifestations of specific deities that the Egyptians worshipped. Bast, the cat goddess is an example of one such deity.
  • Anciient Egyptian Book of the Dead papyrus - Spell 30 for stopping the heart betraying the deceased at the tribunal of Osiris, Iufankh's Book of the Dead, Ptolemai period (332-30BC).Turin Egyptian Museum. White Background<br />
<br />
the spell reads ' Stand not against me as a witness, oppose me not in the Council, act not against me before the gods, outweigh me not before the great God, the Lord os the West"<br />
<br />
The translation of  Iuefankh's Book of the Dead papyrus by Richard Lepsius marked a truning point in the studies of ancient Egyptian funereal studies.
  • Anciient Egyptian Book of the Dead papyrus - Spell 30 for stopping the heart betraying the deceased at the tribunal of Osiris, Iufankh's Book of the Dead, Ptolemai period (332-30BC).Turin Egyptian Museum.  Black background<br />
<br />
the spell reads ' Stand not against me as a witness, oppose me not in the Council, act not against me before the gods, outweigh me not before the great God, the Lord os the West"<br />
<br />
The translation of  Iuefankh's Book of the Dead papyrus by Richard Lepsius marked a truning point in the studies of ancient Egyptian funereal studies.
  • Anciient Egyptian Book of the Dead papyrus - Spell 30 for stopping the heart betraying the deceased at the tribunal of Osiris, Iufankh's Book of the Dead, Ptolemai period (332-30BC).Turin Egyptian Museum. Grey Background<br />
<br />
the spell reads ' Stand not against me as a witness, oppose me not in the Council, act not against me before the gods, outweigh me not before the great God, the Lord os the West"<br />
<br />
The translation of  Iuefankh's Book of the Dead papyrus by Richard Lepsius marked a truning point in the studies of ancient Egyptian funereal studies.
  • Anciient Egyptian Book of the Dead papyrus - Spell 30 for stopping the heart betraying the deceased at the tribunal of Osiris, Iufankh's Book of the Dead, Ptolemai period (332-30BC).Turin Egyptian Museum. <br />
<br />
the spell reads ' Stand not against me as a witness, oppose me not in the Council, act not against me before the gods, outweigh me not before the great God, the Lord os the West"<br />
<br />
The translation of  Iuefankh's Book of the Dead papyrus by Richard Lepsius marked a truning point in the studies of ancient Egyptian funereal studies.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Picture and image  of the Realistic young grieving girl stone funary monument sculpture  commissioned by Enrico Amerigo for his sisters memory. beside the pedestal on which the sculptor set the deceased’s bust he placed, on the left, the figure of an old blind man, kneeling down and leaning on a stick; on the right he placed the figure of a young orphan girl, recognizable as such by her kindergarten uniform, portrayed in the act of making the sign of the cross. This work belongs to the Realism, a trend which was typical during the 1880s and 1890s, according to which the orphans, the poor, the sick and all those who benefited from somebody’s generosity had to be portrayed in a concrete fashion. Sculptor G Moreno 1890. Section A, no 53, The Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image  of the Realistic young grieving girl stone funary monument sculpture  commissioned by Enrico Amerigo for his sisters memory. beside the pedestal on which the sculptor set the deceased’s bust he placed, on the left, the figure of an old blind man, kneeling down and leaning on a stick; on the right he placed the figure of a young orphan girl, recognizable as such by her kindergarten uniform, portrayed in the act of making the sign of the cross. This work belongs to the Realism, a trend which was typical during the 1880s and 1890s, according to which the orphans, the poor, the sick and all those who benefited from somebody’s generosity had to be portrayed in a concrete fashion. Sculptor G Moreno 1890. Section A, no 53, The Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image  of the Realistic young grieving girl stone funary monument sculpture  commissioned by Enrico Amerigo for his sisters memory. beside the pedestal on which the sculptor set the deceased’s bust he placed, on the left, the figure of an old blind man, kneeling down and leaning on a stick; on the right he placed the figure of a young orphan girl, recognizable as such by her kindergarten uniform, portrayed in the act of making the sign of the cross. This work belongs to the Realism, a trend which was typical during the 1880s and 1890s, according to which the orphans, the poor, the sick and all those who benefited from somebody’s generosity had to be portrayed in a concrete fashion. Sculptor G Moreno 1890. Section A, no 53, The Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image  of the Realistic young grieving girl stone funary monument sculpture  commissioned by Enrico Amerigo for his sisters memory. beside the pedestal on which the sculptor set the deceased’s bust he placed, on the left, the figure of an old blind man, kneeling down and leaning on a stick; on the right he placed the figure of a young orphan girl, recognizable as such by her kindergarten uniform, portrayed in the act of making the sign of the cross. This work belongs to the Realism, a trend which was typical during the 1880s and 1890s, according to which the orphans, the poor, the sick and all those who benefited from somebody’s generosity had to be portrayed in a concrete fashion. Sculptor G Moreno 1890. The Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image  of the Realistic young grieving girl stone funary monument sculpture  commissioned by Enrico Amerigo for his sisters memory. beside the pedestal on which the sculptor set the deceased’s bust he placed, on the left, the figure of an old blind man, kneeling down and leaning on a stick; on the right he placed the figure of a young orphan girl, recognizable as such by her kindergarten uniform, portrayed in the act of making the sign of the cross. This work belongs to the Realism, a trend which was typical during the 1880s and 1890s, according to which the orphans, the poor, the sick and all those who benefited from somebody’s generosity had to be portrayed in a concrete fashion. Sculptor G Moreno 1890. Section A, no 53, The Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the Realistic blind man stone funary monument sculpture commissioned by Enrico Amerigo for his sisters memory. beside the pedestal on which the sculptor set the deceased’s bust he placed, on the left, the figure of an old blind man, kneeling down and leaning on a stick; on the right he placed the figure of a young orphan girl, recognizable as such by her kindergarten uniform, portrayed in the act of making the sign of the cross. This work belongs to the Realism, a trend which was typical during the 1880s and 1890s, according to which the orphans, the poor, the sick and all those who benefited from somebody’s generosity had to be portrayed in a concrete fashion. Sculptor G Moreno 1890. Section A, no 53, The Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the life of Eustace . Central panel shows act 2 ?the Tragedy and Exile? , central diamond -   The sailors kidnap Eustace's wife, casting him overboard , below left - possibly Eustace negotiating passage to Egypt, below right Eustace and his family board a boat to Egypt . Above left - Before Eustace can reach land, a lion snatches away his eldest son, above right -  Shepherds rescue Eustace's younger son from the jaws of a wolf. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death.. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death.. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • South Porch, Left Portal (Martyrs). Archivolts - Stephen Disputes with the Jews (Acts 6:9). Cathedral of Chartres, France.  A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD.Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome

FunkyStock Picture Library Resource

Picture The Past

ABOUT

FunkyStock Picture Library free resource for professional editorial picture editors, picture researchers, historical scholars and students and enthusiasts who want to browse some of the best pictures and images of historic countries, historical places, archaeological sites and the very best museum antiquities and artefacts exhibits in Europe and the Middle East.

Pictures and Images can be downloaded or bought as stock photos or photo art prints.

COUNTRIES

Browse travel pictures and images of historic places and archaeological sites of countries in Europe and the Middle East.

VIEW COUNTRIES INDEX....

HISTORICAL

Explore the past through pictures and images of its historic places. See the great palaces, castles and cities of antiquity as well as the great archaeological sites where our ancestors made history.

EXPLORE HISTORICAL PLACES...

MUSEUMS

Browse pictures & images the treasured artefacts and antiquities exhibits from the great Museum of Europe and the Middle East. See the art and objects made by our ancestors.

SEE MUESEUM ANTIQUITIES....