• Ruins of the Armenian City walls built by  King Smbat (977–989) of Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • Ruins of the Armenian City walls built by  King Smbat (977–989) of Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • Ruins of the Armenian City walls built by  King Smbat (977–989) of Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • Ruins of the Armenian City walls built by  King Smbat (977–989) of Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • North Walls & Ravine around Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • North Walls & Ravine with cave houses around Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • North Walls & Ravine with cave houses around Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • Ruins of the Armenian City walls built by  King Smbat (977–989) of Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Ruins of a bridge on the ancient Silk Road in the Ravine of Akhurian River,  Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • Ruins of a bridge on the ancient Silk Road in the Ravine of Akhurian River,  Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • Ruins of a bridge on the ancient Silk Road in the Ravine of Akhurian River,  Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • Armenian script on the outside of Ani Cathedral , Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • Interior The cathedral of Ani, Also known as Surp Asdvadzadzin (church of the Holy Mother of God), its construction was started in the year 989, under King Smbat II.  The Gothic clustered arches & pointed arches pre date the European Gothic and are thought to be an influence for Western European Gothic. Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The cathedral of Ani, Also known as Surp Asdvadzadzin (church of the Holy Mother of God), its construction was started in the year 989, under King Smbat II.  Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Seljuk Turk Mosque of Ebul Minuchihr (Minuchir) built in 1072, Ani archaelogical site on the ancient Silk Road  , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Seljuk Turk Mosque of Ebul Minuchihr (Minuchir) built in 1072, Ani archaelogical site on the ancient Silk Road  , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Seljuk Turk Mosque of Ebul Minuchihr (Minuchir) built in 1072, Ani archaelogical site on the ancient Silk Road  , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Seljuk Turk Mosque of Ebul Minuchihr (Minuchir) built in 1072, Ani archaelogical site on the ancient Silk Road  , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • Ruined Armenian Gothic doorway. The Gothic  pointed arches in Ani pre date the European Gothic and are thought to be an influence for Western European Gothic. Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Seljuk Turk Mosque of Ebul Minuchihr (Minuchir) built in 1072, Ani archaelogical site on the ancient Silk Road  , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • Armenian script on the outside of Ani Cathedral , Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • Armenian script on the outside of Ani Cathedral , Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • Interior The cathedral of Ani, Also known as Surp Asdvadzadzin (church of the Holy Mother of God), its construction was started in the year 989, under King Smbat II.  The Gothic clustered arches & pointed arches pre date the European Gothic and are thought to be an influence for Western European Gothic. Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • Ruins of a Zoroastrian Fire Temple at Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • Interior The cathedral of Ani, Also known as Surp Asdvadzadzin (church of the Holy Mother of God), its construction was started in the year 989, under King Smbat II.  The Gothic clustered arches & pointed arches pre date the European Gothic and are thought to be an influence for Western European Gothic. Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • Ruins of a Zoroastrian Fire Temple at Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The cathedral of Ani, Also known as Surp Asdvadzadzin (church of the Holy Mother of God), its construction was started in the year 989, under King Smbat II.  Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Seljuk Turk Mosque of Ebul Minuchihr (Minuchir) built in 1072, Ani archaelogical site on the ancient Silk Road  , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • Medieval Gothic Door Arch infront of The Seljuk Turk Mosque of Ebul Minuchihr (Minuchir) built in 1072, Ani archaelogical site on the ancient Silk Road  , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • King Gagik's church of St Gregory, constructed between the years 1001 and 1005, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • King Gagik's church of St Gregory, constructed between the years 1001 and 1005, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Seljuk Turk Mosque of Ebul Minuchihr (Minuchir) built in 1072, Ani archaelogical site on the ancient Silk Road  , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • King Gagik's church of St Gregory, constructed between the years 1001 and 1005, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Seljuk Turk Mosque of Ebul Minuchihr (Minuchir) built in 1072, Ani archaelogical site on the ancient Silk Road  , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Seljuk Turk Mosque of Ebul Minuchihr (Minuchir) built in 1072, Ani archaelogical site on the ancient Silk Road  , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Seljuk Turk Mosque of Ebul Minuchihr (Minuchir) built in 1072, Ani archaelogical site on the ancient Silk Road  , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Seljuk Turk Mosque of Ebul Minuchihr (Minuchir) built in 1072, Ani archaelogical site on the ancient Silk Road  , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Seljuk Turk Mosque of Ebul Minuchihr (Minuchir) built in 1072, Ani archaelogical site on the ancient Silk Road  , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Seljuk Turk Mosque of Ebul Minuchihr (Minuchir) built in 1072, Ani archaelogical site on the ancient Silk Road  , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • Interior of the Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • Interior of the Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Kars , Anatolia, Turkey
  • Hattusa city walls & towers reconstruction. Pictures of Hattusa Hittite Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • Pictures of the Arabic astrological observation tower of the 8th century University of  of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 52
  • Pictures of the the ruins of the 8th century University of  Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 50
  • Pictures of the the ruins of the 8th century University of  Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 49
  • Pictures of the the ruins of the 8th century University of  Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 48
  • Pictures of the the ruins of the 8th century University of  Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 47
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 46
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 45
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 44
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 42
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 41
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 38
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 37
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 36
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 35
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 33
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran with a summer outdoor bed,  south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 32
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 30
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 29
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 28
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 27
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 26
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 25
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 24
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 23
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 22
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 20
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 19
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 18
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 17
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 16
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 15
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 14
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 12
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 11
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 10
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 9
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 8
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 7
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside.  6
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 5
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 4
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 3
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 2
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 1
  • Pictures of the Arabic astrological observation tower of the 8th century University of  of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 51
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 43
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran, south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 40
  • Pictures of the beehive adobe buildings of Harran with a summer outdoor bed,  south west Anatolia, Turkey.  Harran was a major ancient city in Upper Mesopotamia whose site is near the modern village of Altınbaşak, Turkey, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of Şanlıurfa. The location is in a district of Şanlıurfa Province that is also named "Harran". Harran is famous for its traditional 'beehive' adobe houses, constructed entirely without wood. The design of these makes them cool inside. 31
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Picture & image of cave dwellings, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of cave dwellings, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of cave dwellings, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of cave dwellings, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of rock caves of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of rock caves of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of rock caves of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of rock caves of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of rock caves of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of rock caves of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Queen Tamar's Hall interior, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Queen Tamar's Hall interior, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Queen Tamar's Hall interior, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Queen Tamar's Hall, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the Theatron vaulted ceiling, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the Theatron vaulted ceiling, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the Theatron vaulted ceiling, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) Theatron. A cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) Theatron. A cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the medieval Christian Basilica, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the medieval Christian Basilica, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city water drain channel, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, rock storage Pit, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city water drain channel, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, rock storage Pit, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, wine press, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, rock storage Pit, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, rock storage Pit, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, house stone shelves, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of cave dwellings, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of cave dwellings, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of cave dwellings, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of cave dwellings, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of cave dwellings, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of cave dwellings, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of cave dwellings, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of cave dwellings, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of  Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of rock hall interiors with decorated ceilings Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of rock hall interiors with decorated ceilings Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the Red Hall interior, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the interior of the one pillar hall Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the interior of the one pillar hall Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the interior of the one pillar hall Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the interior of the one pillar hall Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the interior of the one pillar hall Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of rock caves of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of rock caves of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of rock caves of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of rock caves of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of rock caves of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of rock caves of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of rock caves of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of rock caves of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of rock caves of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of rock caves of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of rock caves of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of rock caves of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of rock caves of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Queen Tamar's Hall, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Queen Tamar's Hall, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Queen Tamar's Hall, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Queen Tamar's Hall, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Queen Tamar's Hall, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the Theatron vaulted ceiling, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the Theatron vaulted ceiling, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) Theatron. A cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the medieval Christian Basilica, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) Theatron. A cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the medieval Christian Basilica, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the medieval Christian Basilica, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the medieval Christian Basilica, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the medieval Christian Basilica, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the medieval Christian Basilica, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the medieval Christian Basilica, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the medieval Christian Basilica, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the medieval Christian Basilica, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the medieval Christian Basilica, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the medieval Christian Basilica, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the medieval Christian Basilica, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the medieval Christian Basilica, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the medieval Christian Basilica, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) walls. A cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of the medieval Christian Basilica, Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Picture & image of Uplistsikhe (Lords Fortress) troglodyte cave city, near Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia. UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the early Iron age to the late middle ages Uplistsikhe cave city eas, during the Roman & Hellenistic period, home to around 20,000 people.
  • Pictures & images of Guzelyurt cave city across the the Vadisi Monastery Valley, "Manastır Vadisi”,  Ihlara Valley, Guzelyurt , Aksaray Province, Turkey.
  • Pictures & images of Guzelyurt cave city across the the Vadisi Monastery Valley, "Manastır Vadisi”,  Ihlara Valley, Guzelyurt , Aksaray Province, Turkey.
  • Pictures & images of Guzelyurt cave city across the the Vadisi Monastery Valley, "Manastır Vadisi”,  Ihlara Valley, Guzelyurt , Aksaray Province, Turkey.
  • Pictures & images of Guzelyurt cave city across the the Vadisi Monastery Valley, "Manastır Vadisi”,  Ihlara Valley, Guzelyurt , Aksaray Province, Turkey.
  • Pictures & images of Guzelyurt cave city across the the Vadisi Monastery Valley, "Manastır Vadisi”,  Ihlara Valley, Guzelyurt , Aksaray Province, Turkey.
  • Pictures & images of Guzelyurt cave city across the the Vadisi Monastery Valley, "Manastır Vadisi”,  Ihlara Valley, Guzelyurt , Aksaray Province, Turkey.
  • Pictures & images of Guzelyurt cave city across the the Vadisi Monastery Valley, "Manastır Vadisi”,  Ihlara Valley, Guzelyurt , Aksaray Province, Turkey.
  • Pictures & images of Guzelyurt cave city across the the Vadisi Monastery Valley, "Manastır Vadisi”,  Ihlara Valley, Guzelyurt , Aksaray Province, Turkey.
  • Pictures & images of Guzelyurt cave city across the the Vadisi Monastery Valley, "Manastır Vadisi”,  Ihlara Valley, Guzelyurt , Aksaray Province, Turkey.
  • Pictures & images of Guzelyurt cave city across the the Vadisi Monastery Valley, "Manastır Vadisi”,  Ihlara Valley, Guzelyurt , Aksaray Province, Turkey.
  • Pictures & images of Guzelyurt cave city across the the Vadisi Monastery Valley, "Manastır Vadisi”,  Ihlara Valley, Guzelyurt , Aksaray Province, Turkey.
  • Ruins of the Armenian City walls built by  King Smbat (977–989) of Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road ,Turkey
  • Ruins of the Armenian City walls built by  King Smbat (977–989) of Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road ,Turkey
  • Ruins of the Armenian City walls built by  King Smbat (977–989) of Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road ,Turkey
  • Ruins of the Armenian City walls built by  King Smbat (977–989) of Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road ,Turkey
  • Ruins of a Zoroastrian Fire Temple at Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road ,  Anatolia, Turkey
  • Armenian script over thr door of the cathedral of Ani, Also known as Surp Asdvadzadzin (church of the Holy Mother of God), its construction was started in the year 989, under King Smbat II.  Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road ,  Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road ,  Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road ,  Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road ,  Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road ,  Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road ,  Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road ,  Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road ,  Anatolia, Turkey

FunkyStock Picture Library Resource

Picture The Past

ABOUT

FunkyStock Picture Library free resource for professional editorial picture editors, picture researchers, historical scholars and students and enthusiasts who want to browse some of the best pictures and images of historic countries, historical places, archaeological sites and the very best museum antiquities and artefacts exhibits in Europe and the Middle East.

Pictures and Images can be downloaded or bought as stock photos or photo art prints.

COUNTRIES

Browse travel pictures and images of historic places and archaeological sites of countries in Europe and the Middle East.

VIEW COUNTRIES INDEX....

HISTORICAL

Explore the past through pictures and images of its historic places. See the great palaces, castles and cities of antiquity as well as the great archaeological sites where our ancestors made history.

EXPLORE HISTORICAL PLACES...

MUSEUMS

Browse pictures & images the treasured artefacts and antiquities exhibits from the great Museum of Europe and the Middle East. See the art and objects made by our ancestors.

SEE MUESEUM ANTIQUITIES....