• Roman bronze statue fragment of emperor Augustus, Circa 12-10 BC,  found in the Agean sea of  the Island of Euboea, Athens National Archaeological Museum. cat no X 23322. Against grey.<br />
<br />
The emperor Augustus is depicted in mature age mounting a horse. He wears a tunica with verivle purple stripes (clavus purpurea) fringed with a meander pattern. Icongraphic features of bthe Prima Porta and Actuim type of statue are incorporated in this brnze statue. The right hand is raised in a gesture of offical greeting and the left hand held the horses reigns. A ring on the finger gears has engraved the symbol of Pontifles Maximus assumed by Augustus in 12 BC
  • Roman bronze statue fragment of emperor Augustus, Circa 12-10 BC,  found in the Agean sea of  the Island of Euboea, Athens National Archaeological Museum. cat no X 23322. Against grey.<br />
<br />
The emperor Augustus is depicted in mature age mounting a horse. He wears a tunica with verivle purple stripes (clavus purpurea) fringed with a meander pattern. Icongraphic features of bthe Prima Porta and Actuim type of statue are incorporated in this brnze statue. The right hand is raised in a gesture of offical greeting and the left hand held the horses reigns. A ring on the finger gears has engraved the symbol of Pontifles Maximus assumed by Augustus in 12 BC
  • Roman bronze statue fragment of emperor Augustus, Circa 12-10 BC,  found in the Agean sea of  the Island of Euboea, Athens National Archaeological Museum. cat no X 23322.<br />
<br />
The emperor Augustus is depicted in mature age mounting a horse. He wears a tunica with verivle purple stripes (clavus purpurea) fringed with a meander pattern. Icongraphic features of bthe Prima Porta and Actuim type of statue are incorporated in this brnze statue. The right hand is raised in a gesture of offical greeting and the left hand held the horses reigns. A ring on the finger gears has engraved the symbol of Pontifles Maximus assumed by Augustus in 12 BC
  • Bronze statue of Roman empress Julia Aquilia Severa found at Sparta. circa 221-222 AD.  Athens National Archaeological Museum, Cat No X23321. Against white.<br />
<br />
The women in the Bronze statue wears a Chiton and himation and would have had a crwon on her head. The hair style is typical of the Severan dynisty. Julia Aquilia was the last wife of emperor Elagobalus (218-222 AD) and the damage to the statue is due to a building collapsing on it after a fire circa 221-222 AD
  • Bronze statue of Roman empress Julia Aquilia Severa found at Sparta. circa 221-222 AD.  Athens National Archaeological Museum, Cat No X23321. Against grey.<br />
<br />
The women in the Bronze statue wears a Chiton and himation and would have had a crwon on her head. The hair style is typical of the Severan dynisty. Julia Aquilia was the last wife of emperor Elagobalus (218-222 AD) and the damage to the statue is due to a building collapsing on it after a fire circa 221-222 AD
  • Bronze statue of Roman empress Julia Aquilia Severa found at Sparta. circa 221-222 AD.  Athens National Archaeological Museum, Cat No X23321. Against grey.<br />
<br />
The women in the Bronze statue wears a Chiton and himation and would have had a crwon on her head. The hair style is typical of the Severan dynisty. Julia Aquilia was the last wife of emperor Elagobalus (218-222 AD) and the damage to the statue is due to a building collapsing on it after a fire circa 221-222 AD
  • Bronze statue of Roman empress Julia Aquilia Severa found at Sparta. circa 221-222 AD.  Athens National Archaeological Museum, Cat No X23321.<br />
<br />
The women in the Bronze statue wears a Chiton and himation and would have had a crwon on her head. The hair style is typical of the Severan dynisty. Julia Aquilia was the last wife of emperor Elagobalus (218-222 AD) and the damage to the statue is due to a building collapsing on it after a fire circa 221-222 AD
  • Roman bronze statue fragment of emperor Augustus, Circa 12-10 BC,  found in the Agean sea of  the Island of Euboea, Athens National Archaeological Museum. cat no X 23322. Against black<br />
<br />
The emperor Augustus is depicted in mature age mounting a horse. He wears a tunica with verivle purple stripes (clavus purpurea) fringed with a meander pattern. Icongraphic features of bthe Prima Porta and Actuim type of statue are incorporated in this brnze statue. The right hand is raised in a gesture of offical greeting and the left hand held the horses reigns. A ring on the finger gears has engraved the symbol of Pontifles Maximus assumed by Augustus in 12 BC
  • Roman bronze statue fragment of emperor Augustus, Circa 12-10 BC,  found in the Agean sea of  the Island of Euboea, Athens National Archaeological Museum. cat no X 23322. Against white.<br />
<br />
The emperor Augustus is depicted in mature age mounting a horse. He wears a tunica with verivle purple stripes (clavus purpurea) fringed with a meander pattern. Icongraphic features of bthe Prima Porta and Actuim type of statue are incorporated in this brnze statue. The right hand is raised in a gesture of offical greeting and the left hand held the horses reigns. A ring on the finger gears has engraved the symbol of Pontifles Maximus assumed by Augustus in 12 BC
  • Roman bronze statue fragment of emperor Augustus, Circa 12-10 BC,  found in the Agean sea of  the Island of Euboea, Athens National Archaeological Museum. cat no X 23322.<br />
<br />
The emperor Augustus is depicted in mature age mounting a horse. He wears a tunica with verivle purple stripes (clavus purpurea) fringed with a meander pattern. Icongraphic features of bthe Prima Porta and Actuim type of statue are incorporated in this brnze statue. The right hand is raised in a gesture of offical greeting and the left hand held the horses reigns. A ring on the finger gears has engraved the symbol of Pontifles Maximus assumed by Augustus in 12 BC
  • Roman bronze statue fragment of emperor Augustus, Circa 12-10 BC,  found in the Agean sea of  the Island of Euboea, Athens National Archaeological Museum. cat no X 23322. Against white.<br />
<br />
The emperor Augustus is depicted in mature age mounting a horse. He wears a tunica with verivle purple stripes (clavus purpurea) fringed with a meander pattern. Icongraphic features of bthe Prima Porta and Actuim type of statue are incorporated in this brnze statue. The right hand is raised in a gesture of offical greeting and the left hand held the horses reigns. A ring on the finger gears has engraved the symbol of Pontifles Maximus assumed by Augustus in 12 BC
  • Roman bronze statue fragment of emperor Augustus, Circa 12-10 BC,  found in the Agean sea of  the Island of Euboea, Athens National Archaeological Museum. cat no X 23322. Against black<br />
<br />
The emperor Augustus is depicted in mature age mounting a horse. He wears a tunica with verivle purple stripes (clavus purpurea) fringed with a meander pattern. Icongraphic features of bthe Prima Porta and Actuim type of statue are incorporated in this brnze statue. The right hand is raised in a gesture of offical greeting and the left hand held the horses reigns. A ring on the finger gears has engraved the symbol of Pontifles Maximus assumed by Augustus in 12 BC
  • Roman bronze statue fragment of emperor Augustus, Circa 12-10 BC,  found in the Agean sea of  the Island of Euboea, Athens National Archaeological Museum. cat no X 23322. Against grey.<br />
<br />
The emperor Augustus is depicted in mature age mounting a horse. He wears a tunica with verivle purple stripes (clavus purpurea) fringed with a meander pattern. Icongraphic features of bthe Prima Porta and Actuim type of statue are incorporated in this brnze statue. The right hand is raised in a gesture of offical greeting and the left hand held the horses reigns. A ring on the finger gears has engraved the symbol of Pontifles Maximus assumed by Augustus in 12 BC
  • Roman bronze statue fragment of emperor Augustus, Circa 12-10 BC,  found in the Agean sea of  the Island of Euboea, Athens National Archaeological Museum. cat no X 23322.<br />
<br />
The emperor Augustus is depicted in mature age mounting a horse. He wears a tunica with verivle purple stripes (clavus purpurea) fringed with a meander pattern. Icongraphic features of bthe Prima Porta and Actuim type of statue are incorporated in this brnze statue. The right hand is raised in a gesture of offical greeting and the left hand held the horses reigns. A ring on the finger gears has engraved the symbol of Pontifles Maximus assumed by Augustus in 12 BC
  • Roman bronze statue fragment of emperor Augustus, Circa 12-10 BC,  found in the Agean sea of  the Island of Euboea, Athens National Archaeological Museum. cat no X 23322. Against grey.<br />
<br />
The emperor Augustus is depicted in mature age mounting a horse. He wears a tunica with verivle purple stripes (clavus purpurea) fringed with a meander pattern. Icongraphic features of bthe Prima Porta and Actuim type of statue are incorporated in this brnze statue. The right hand is raised in a gesture of offical greeting and the left hand held the horses reigns. A ring on the finger gears has engraved the symbol of Pontifles Maximus assumed by Augustus in 12 BC
  • Roman bronze statue fragment of emperor Augustus, Circa 12-10 BC,  found in the Agean sea of  the Island of Euboea, Athens National Archaeological Museum. cat no X 23322. Against black<br />
<br />
The emperor Augustus is depicted in mature age mounting a horse. He wears a tunica with verivle purple stripes (clavus purpurea) fringed with a meander pattern. Icongraphic features of bthe Prima Porta and Actuim type of statue are incorporated in this brnze statue. The right hand is raised in a gesture of offical greeting and the left hand held the horses reigns. A ring on the finger gears has engraved the symbol of Pontifles Maximus assumed by Augustus in 12 BC
  • Roman bronze statue fragment of emperor Augustus, Circa 12-10 BC,  found in the Agean sea of  the Island of Euboea, Athens National Archaeological Museum. cat no X 23322. Against grey.<br />
<br />
The emperor Augustus is depicted in mature age mounting a horse. He wears a tunica with verivle purple stripes (clavus purpurea) fringed with a meander pattern. Icongraphic features of bthe Prima Porta and Actuim type of statue are incorporated in this brnze statue. The right hand is raised in a gesture of offical greeting and the left hand held the horses reigns. A ring on the finger gears has engraved the symbol of Pontifles Maximus assumed by Augustus in 12 BC
  • Roman bronze statue fragment of emperor Augustus, Circa 12-10 BC,  found in the Agean sea of  the Island of Euboea, Athens National Archaeological Museum. cat no X 23322. Against grey.<br />
<br />
The emperor Augustus is depicted in mature age mounting a horse. He wears a tunica with verivle purple stripes (clavus purpurea) fringed with a meander pattern. Icongraphic features of bthe Prima Porta and Actuim type of statue are incorporated in this brnze statue. The right hand is raised in a gesture of offical greeting and the left hand held the horses reigns. A ring on the finger gears has engraved the symbol of Pontifles Maximus assumed by Augustus in 12 BC
  • Bronze statue of Roman empress Julia Aquilia Severa found at Sparta. circa 221-222 AD.  Athens National Archaeological Museum, Cat No X23321. Against black<br />
<br />
The women in the Bronze statue wears a Chiton and himation and would have had a crwon on her head. The hair style is typical of the Severan dynisty. Julia Aquilia was the last wife of emperor Elagobalus (218-222 AD) and the damage to the statue is due to a building collapsing on it after a fire circa 221-222 AD
  • Roman bronze statue fragment of emperor Augustus, Circa 12-10 BC,  found in the Agean sea of  the Island of Euboea, Athens National Archaeological Museum. cat no X 23322. Against white.<br />
<br />
The emperor Augustus is depicted in mature age mounting a horse. He wears a tunica with verivle purple stripes (clavus purpurea) fringed with a meander pattern. Icongraphic features of bthe Prima Porta and Actuim type of statue are incorporated in this brnze statue. The right hand is raised in a gesture of offical greeting and the left hand held the horses reigns. A ring on the finger gears has engraved the symbol of Pontifles Maximus assumed by Augustus in 12 BC
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos with belted peplos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The matronly figure wears a belted classical dress (peplos) and held her long cloak up behind. The square hole above her shoulder with a corresponding hole in the back, was for lifting the finished relief into the ancient building by crane.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos with belted peplos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The matronly figure wears a belted classical dress (peplos) and held her long cloak up behind. The square hole above her shoulder with a corresponding hole in the back, was for lifting the finished relief into the ancient building by crane.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos with belted peplos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The matronly figure wears a belted classical dress (peplos) and held her long cloak up behind. The square hole above her shoulder with a corresponding hole in the back, was for lifting the finished relief into the ancient building by crane.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos with belted peplos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The matronly figure wears a belted classical dress (peplos) and held her long cloak up behind. The square hole above her shoulder with a corresponding hole in the back, was for lifting the finished relief into the ancient building by crane.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos with belted peplos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The matronly figure wears a belted classical dress (peplos) and held her long cloak up behind. The square hole above her shoulder with a corresponding hole in the back, was for lifting the finished relief into the ancient building by crane.
  • Roman marble statue of Hermes found at Aigion, Pelopenese. 27 BC - 14 AD. Athens Archaeological Museum Cat No 241.<br />
<br />
Hermes is depicted standing wearing a chalamys that is wound around his lest arm. In his right hand he holds a purse and in his left a 'caduceus'. Augustan Roman period
  • Roman funerary statue of a women in the Large Herculaneum style, Found in the cemetery of Stagiou Street, Athens, Athens Archaeological Museum, cat no 32622. Against black<br />
<br />
This statue is the typle known as the Large Herculaneum Wome. She wears a full length chiton and himation that covers her head and entire body. Dating from the 1st cent AD it is a copy of an earlier statue circa 320 BC, probably by Praxiteles
  • Roman funerary statue of a women in the Large Herculaneum style, Found in the cemetery of Stagiou Street, Athens, Athens Archaeological Museum, cat no 32622.  against grey<br />
<br />
This statue is the typle known as the Large Herculaneum Wome. She wears a full length chiton and himation that covers her head and entire body. Dating from the 1st cent AD it is a copy of an earlier statue circa 320 BC, probably by Praxiteles
  • The 'Atalante Hermes' Roman marble statue found at Atalante. 2nd Cemt AD copy of the 4th cent BC Lysippean Greek style. Athens Archaeological Museum, cat no 240. Against black<br />
<br />
Funserary statue of a youth depicted as Hermes. He is shown nude with his chlamys over his shoulder and wound around his right arm. In his left hand he holds a 'caduceus'.
  • The 'Atalante Hermes' Roman marble statue found at Atalante. 2nd Cemt AD copy of the 4th cent BC Lysippean Greek style. Athens Archaeological Museum, cat no 240. Against grey<br />
<br />
Funserary statue of a youth depicted as Hermes. He is shown nude with his chlamys over his shoulder and wound around his right arm. In his left hand he holds a 'caduceus'.
  • Roman marble statue of Hermes found at Aigion, Pelopenese. 27 BC - 14 AD. Athens Archaeological Museum Cat No 241. Against black<br />
<br />
Hermes is depicted standing wearing a chalamys that is wound around his lest arm. In his right hand he holds a purse and in his left a 'caduceus'. Augustan Roman period
  • Roman funerary statue of a women in the Large Herculaneum style, Found in the cemetery of Stagiou Street, Athens, Athens Archaeological Museum, cat no 32622. Against white, <br />
<br />
This statue is the typle known as the Large Herculaneum Wome. She wears a full length chiton and himation that covers her head and entire body. Dating from the 1st cent AD it is a copy of an earlier statue circa 320 BC, probably by Praxiteles
  • Roman funerary statue of a women in the Large Herculaneum style, Found in the cemetery of Stagiou Street, Athens, Athens Archaeological Museum, cat no 32622.<br />
<br />
This statue is the typle known as the Large Herculaneum Wome. She wears a full length chiton and himation that covers her head and entire body. Dating from the 1st cent AD it is a copy of an earlier statue circa 320 BC, probably by Praxiteles
  • Roman funerary statue of a women in the Large Herculaneum style, Found in the cemetery of Stagiou Street, Athens, Athens Archaeological Museum, cat no 32622.  against grey<br />
<br />
This statue is the typle known as the Large Herculaneum Wome. She wears a full length chiton and himation that covers her head and entire body. Dating from the 1st cent AD it is a copy of an earlier statue circa 320 BC, probably by Praxiteles
  • The 'Atalante Hermes' Roman marble statue found at Atalante. 2nd Cemt AD copy of the 4th cent BC Lysippean Greek style. Athens Archaeological Museum, cat no 240. Against white, <br />
<br />
Funserary statue of a youth depicted as Hermes. He is shown nude with his chlamys over his shoulder and wound around his right arm. In his left hand he holds a 'caduceus'.
  • The 'Atalante Hermes' Roman marble statue found at Atalante. 2nd Cemt AD copy of the 4th cent BC Lysippean Greek style. Athens Archaeological Museum, cat no 240.<br />
<br />
Funserary statue of a youth depicted as Hermes. He is shown nude with his chlamys over his shoulder and wound around his right arm. In his left hand he holds a 'caduceus'.
  • Roman marble statue of Hermes found at Aigion, Pelopenese. 27 BC - 14 AD. Athens Archaeological Museum Cat No 241. Against white, <br />
<br />
Hermes is depicted standing wearing a chalamys that is wound around his lest arm. In his right hand he holds a purse and in his left a 'caduceus'. Augustan Roman period
  • Roman marble statue of Hermes found at Aigion, Pelopenese. 27 BC - 14 AD. Athens Archaeological Museum Cat No 241. Against grey<br />
<br />
Hermes is depicted standing wearing a chalamys that is wound around his lest arm. In his right hand he holds a purse and in his left a 'caduceus'. Augustan Roman period
  • Roman marble statue of Hermes found at Aigion, Pelopenese. 27 BC- 14AD. Athens Archaeological Museum Cat No 241. Against grey<br />
<br />
Hermes is depicted standing wearing a chalamys that is wound around his lest arm. In his right hand he holds a purse and in his left a 'caduceus'. Augustan Roman period
  • The 'Atalante Hermes' Roman marble statue found at Atalante. 2nd Cemt AD copy of the 4th cent BC Lysippean Greek style. Athens Archaeological Museum, cat no 240. Against grey<br />
<br />
Funserary statue of a youth depicted as Hermes. He is shown nude with his chlamys over his shoulder and wound around his right arm. In his left hand he holds a 'caduceus'.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Asklepios. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.  Against a grey background
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Asklepios. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Dionysus. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Dionysus  is the god of the grape-harvest, winemaking and wine, of fertility, ritual madness, religious ecstasy, and theatre in ancient Greek religion and myth.
  • Roman statue of Dionysus. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Dionysus  is the god of the grape-harvest, winemaking and wine, of fertility, ritual madness, religious ecstasy, and theatre in ancient Greek religion and myth.
  • Roman statue of Asclepius. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no .Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, one of his his daughters is Hygieia
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/196. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/196. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Modest Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Modest Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery. Against a grey background
  • Roman statue of Asklepios. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology.
  • Roman statue of Asklepios. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology.
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Asklepios. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology.
  • Roman statue of Asklepios. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Dionysus. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Dionysus  is the god of the grape-harvest, winemaking and wine, of fertility, ritual madness, religious ecstasy, and theatre in ancient Greek religion and myth.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Asclepius. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no .Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, one of his his daughters is Hygieia
  • Roman statue of Asclepius. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no .Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, one of his his daughters is Hygieia
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/196. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/196. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/196. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Modest Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Modest Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Asklepios. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology.
  • Roman statue of Asklepios. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology.
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Asklepios. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology.
  • Roman statue of Asklepios. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Hermes. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Hermes is the god of trade, heraldry, merchants, commerce, roads, sports, travelers, and athletes in Ancient Greek religion and mythology; the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, he was the second youngest of the Olympian gods
  • Roman statue of Dionysus. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Dionysus  is the god of the grape-harvest, winemaking and wine, of fertility, ritual madness, religious ecstasy, and theatre in ancient Greek religion and myth.
  • Roman statue of Dionysus. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Dionysus  is the god of the grape-harvest, winemaking and wine, of fertility, ritual madness, religious ecstasy, and theatre in ancient Greek religion and myth.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Hecate. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2010/541. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
 Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • Roman statue of Asclepius. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no .Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, one of his his daughters is Hygieia
  • Roman statue of Asclepius. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no .Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, one of his his daughters is Hygieia
  • Roman statue of Modest Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Statue of a female inj the Small Herculaneum Style, Athens Archaeological Museum, Cat no 242. Pentelic marble. <br />
<br />
Copy of earlier famous Greek statue dated 300 BC. The women is depicted wearing a full length chiton and a himation that covers her entire body.
  • Statue of a female inj the Small Herculaneum Style, Athens Archaeological Museum, Cat no 242. Pentelic marble.  Against grey<br />
<br />
Copy of earlier famous Greek statue dated 300 BC. The women is depicted wearing a full length chiton and a himation that covers her entire body.
  • Marble statue of Pan found in Sparta, Pelopenese, 1st Cent AD copy of 4th Cent BC Greek original. Athens Archaeological Museum Cat No 252. Against black<br />
<br />
Pan, the goat footed god wears an animal pelt from which protrude only his jhairy legs. In his left hand he is holding pan pipes. The expression on his bestial featured face is softened by a broad smile.
  • Statue of a female inj the Small Herculaneum Style, Athens Archaeological Museum, Cat no 242. Pentelic marble.  Against white, <br />
<br />
Copy of earlier famous Greek statue dated 300 BC. The women is depicted wearing a full length chiton and a himation that covers her entire body.
  • Statue of a female inj the Small Herculaneum Style, Athens Archaeological Museum, Cat no 242. Pentelic marble. Against black<br />
<br />
Copy of earlier famous Greek statue dated 300 BC. The women is depicted wearing a full length chiton and a himation that covers her entire body.
  • Marble statue of Pan found in Sparta, Pelopenese, 1st Cent AD copy of 4th Cent BC Greek original. Athens Archaeological Museum Cat No 252. Against grey<br />
<br />
Pan, the goat footed god wears an animal pelt from which protrude only his jhairy legs. In his left hand he is holding pan pipes. The expression on his bestial featured face is softened by a broad smile.
  • Marble statue of Pan found in Sparta, Pelopenese, 1st Cent AD copy of 4th Cent BC Greek original. Athens Archaeological Museum Cat No 252. Against grey<br />
<br />
Pan, the goat footed god wears an animal pelt from which protrude only his jhairy legs. In his left hand he is holding pan pipes. The expression on his bestial featured face is softened by a broad smile.
  • Statue of a female inj the Small Herculaneum Style, Athens Archaeological Museum, Cat no 242. Pentelic marble. Against grey<br />
<br />
Copy of earlier famous Greek statue dated 300 BC. The women is depicted wearing a full length chiton and a himation that covers her entire body.
  • Marble statue of Pan found in Sparta, Pelopenese, 1st Cent AD copy of 4th Cent BC Greek original. Athens Archaeological Museum Cat No 252. Against white, <br />
<br />
Pan, the goat footed god wears an animal pelt from which protrude only his jhairy legs. In his left hand he is holding pan pipes. The expression on his bestial featured face is softened by a broad smile.
  • Marble statue of Pan found in Sparta, Pelopenese, 1st Cent AD copy of 4th Cent BC Greek original. Athens Archaeological Museum Cat No 252.<br />
<br />
Pan, the goat footed god wears an animal pelt from which protrude only his jhairy legs. In his left hand he is holding pan pipes. The expression on his bestial featured face is softened by a broad smile.
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy

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