• Nail Varnish dripping from a nail varnish brush balanced on a nail varnish bottle. Pink colour against white with a reflection
  • 2 Nail varnish bottles balanced on each other in a fun way
  • 2 Nail varnish bottles balanced on each other in a fun way with a nail varnish brush balanced ontop dripping nail varnish.
  • 2 Nail varnish bottles balanced on each other in a fun way with a nail varnish brush balanced ontop dripping nail varnish.
  • Nail Varnish dripping from a nail varnish brush balanced on a nail varnish bottle. Pink colour against white with a reflection
  • Nail Varnish dripping from a nail varnish brush balanced on a nail varnish bottle. Pink colour against white with a reflection
  • Nail Varnish dripping from a nail varnish brush balanced on a nail varnish bottle. Pink colour against white with a reflection
  • Nail Varnish dripping from a nail varnish brush balanced on a nail varnish bottle. Peach colour against white with a reflection
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba delle Leonesse". A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design. Six painted columns divide the walls to give the tomb the appearance of a pavillion. In the typanium of the back wall are two lionesses below which is a large Krater used to mix water and wine, flanked by two musicians and a female dancer.  Circa 520 BC. Excavated 1874, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba delle Leonesse". A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design. Six painted columns divide the walls to give the tomb the appearance of a pavillion. In the typanium of the back wall are two lionesses below which is a large Krater used to mix water and wine, flanked by two musicians and a female dancer.  Circa 520 BC. Excavated 1874, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba delle Leonesse". A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design. Six painted columns divide the walls to give the tomb the appearance of a pavillion. In the typanium of the back wall are two lionesses below which is a large Krater used to mix water and wine, flanked by two musicians and a female dancer.  Circa 520 BC. Excavated 1874, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba delle Leonesse". A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design. Six painted columns divide the walls to give the tomb the appearance of a pavillion. In the typanium of the back wall are two lionesses below which is a large Krater used to mix water and wine, flanked by two musicians and a female dancer.  Circa 520 BC. Excavated 1874, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a bronze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a bronze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a bronze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a braze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a braze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a braze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba delle Leonesse". A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design. Six painted columns divide the walls to give the tomb the appearance of a pavillion. In the typanium of the back wall are two lionesses below which is a large Krater used to mix water and wine, flanked by two musicians and a female dancer.  Circa 520 BC. Excavated 1874, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba delle Leonesse". A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design. Six painted columns divide the walls to give the tomb the appearance of a pavillion. In the typanium of the back wall are two lionesses below which is a large Krater used to mix water and wine, flanked by two musicians and a female dancer.  Circa 520 BC. Excavated 1874, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a bronze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a braze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a braze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Interior of a chapel and Orthodox icons of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Ruins of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of the goddess Herma (day), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Goddess  Herma or Day steadies a dramatically billowing cloak that frames her head. The motif , also visible on the Okeanos relief, indicates flying, floating and divine epiphany - the appearance of gods to mortals. Day would be paired with night : together they signify the eternity of the Roman imperial order.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of the goddess Herma (day), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess  Herma or Day steadies a dramatically billowing cloak that frames her head. The motif , also visible on the Okeanos relief, indicates flying, floating and divine epiphany - the appearance of gods to mortals. Day would be paired with night : together they signify the eternity of the Roman imperial order.
  • Roman SSebasteion relief sculpture of the goddess Herma (day), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Goddess  Herma or Day steadies a dramatically billowing cloak that frames her head. The motif , also visible on the Okeanos relief, indicates flying, floating and divine epiphany - the appearance of gods to mortals. Day would be paired with night : together they signify the eternity of the Roman imperial order.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of the goddess Herma (day), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Goddess  Herma or Day steadies a dramatically billowing cloak that frames her head. The motif , also visible on the Okeanos relief, indicates flying, floating and divine epiphany - the appearance of gods to mortals. Day would be paired with night : together they signify the eternity of the Roman imperial order.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of the goddess Herma (day), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Goddess  Herma or Day steadies a dramatically billowing cloak that frames her head. The motif , also visible on the Okeanos relief, indicates flying, floating and divine epiphany - the appearance of gods to mortals. Day would be paired with night : together they signify the eternity of the Roman imperial order.
  • The marble crown gate of the Sifaiye Medrese has a very rich decorative appearance, 1217. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. Sivas, Turkey
  • Door of Gök Medrese which has a very rich decorative appearance. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. The crown gate of Gök Medrese is one of the best examples of Sejuk architecture in Anatolia, Sivas, Turkey
  • Door of Gök Medrese which has a very rich decorative appearance. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. The crown gate of Gök Medrese is one of the best examples of Sejuk architecture in Anatolia, Sivas, Turkey
  • Door of Gök Medrese which has a very rich decorative appearance. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. The crown gate of Gök Medrese is one of the best examples of Sejuk architecture in Anatolia, Sivas, Turkey
  • Door of Gök Medrese which has a very rich decorative appearance. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. The crown gate of Gök Medrese is one of the best examples of Sejuk architecture in Anatolia, Sivas, Turkey
  • Door of Gök Medrese which has a very rich decorative appearance. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. The crown gate of Gök Medrese is one of the best examples of Sejuk architecture in Anatolia, Sivas, Turkey
  • Door of Gök Medrese which has a very rich decorative appearance. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. The crown gate of Gök Medrese is one of the best examples of Sejuk architecture in Anatolia, Sivas, Turkey
  • Door of Gök Medrese which has a very rich decorative appearance. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. The crown gate of Gök Medrese is one of the best examples of Sejuk architecture in Anatolia, Sivas, Turkey
  • The marble crown gate of Gök Medrese has a very rich decorative appearance. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. The crown gate of Gök Medrese is one of the best examples of Sejuk architecture in Anatolia, Sivas, Turkey
  • The marble crown gate of Gök Medrese has a very rich decorative appearance. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. The crown gate of Gök Medrese is one of the best examples of Sejuk architecture in Anatolia, Sivas, Turkey
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a bronze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Byzantine mosaics of of angels in Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Christ being baptised by John The Baptist in Byzantine mosaics of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Christ being baptised by John The Baptist in Byzantine mosaics of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Christ being baptised by John The Baptist in Byzantine mosaics of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The crusifiction Byzantine mosaic of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Byzantine mosaics of Christ i Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Interior of a chapel and Orthodox icons of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Interior of a chapel and Orthodox icons of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Interior of a chapel and Orthodox icons of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Interior of a chapel and Orthodox icons of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Ruins of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Ossary of Victims  of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance.  The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Ruins of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Ruins of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine chapel & Ossary of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Angels appearing to Abraham, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of God appearing to Noah, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind. . Against an white background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind.  . Against an black background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind. . Against a grey background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind. Against an art background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind.
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind. . Against an white background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind.  . Against an black background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind. Against an art background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind. . Against a grey background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind.
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind. . Against an white background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind. . Against an black background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind. . Against a grey background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind. Against an art background
  • Roman sarcophagus with relief sculptures from Hierapolis . Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey<br />
<br />
Columned Sarcophagus Sarcopinagu of Euthios Pyrrnon, Asian Archon (ruler), Roman Period First quarter of third century A.D. Loadicea. <br />
 <br />
Four sides of these sarcophagi are all in relief. They appear like a columned temple. The reliefs between the grooved columns are related to the private life of the individual. His/her education, heroic scenes and plant or mythological motifs are decorated in relief. The cover of the sarcophagus is arranged like a bed and it is depicted as the wife and the husband as lying on it. The name of the individual and some mythological reliefs are found in the surrounding of the cover. The two sarcophagi in the hall are of this kind.
  • Aurochs skulls covered in lime plaster to make waht appear to be seats. On the wall are frescoes of hand prints will a platererd bulls skull. A reconstruction of one of four Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Angels appearing to Abraham, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of God appearing to Noah, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Double sided Roman herm of Dionysus from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the via Sallustiani, Rome. This bust shows Dionysus with his traditional band around his head, he appears as a youthful man on one side and as a mature man with a beard on this sid.   The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Double sided Roman herm of Dionysus from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the via Sallustiani, Rome. This bust shows Dionysus with his traditional band around his head, he appears as a youthful man on one side and as a mature man with a beard on this sid.   The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Double sided Roman herm of Dionysus from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the via Sallustiani, Rome. This bust shows Dionysus with his traditional band around his head, he appears as a youthful man on one side and as a mature man with a beard on this sid.   The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 47  - sculpture of a a bald dancing female dressed in a tight filling tunic. The image is probably a warning against the sexual senses that can be aroused by dancing. The figure has her legs crossed and appears to be recoiling from an impending violation. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Double sided Roman herm of Dionysus from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the via Sallustiani, Rome. This bust shows Dionysus with his traditional band around his head, he appears as a youthful man on one side and as a mature man with a beard on this sid.   The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Double sided Roman herm of Dionysus from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the via Sallustiani, Rome. This bust shows Dionysus with his traditional band around his head, he appears as a youthful man on one side and as a mature man with a beard on this sid.   The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Double sided Roman herm of Dionysus from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the via Sallustiani, Rome. This bust shows Dionysus with his traditional band around his head, he appears as a youthful man on one side and as a mature man with a beard on this sid.   The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Double sided Roman herm of Dionysus from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the via Sallustiani, Rome. This bust shows Dionysus with his traditional band around his head, he appears as a youthful man on one side and as a mature man with a beard on this sid.   The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • South Porch, Right Portal, Left Jambs. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statue of the four ?Confessors? important intellectual and spiritual leaders, most of whom lived during the early centuries of the Church. They stand on historiated socles- there are canopies offer their heads with architectural motifs. From left to right they are .1) Laumer (also called Lomer or Laudomarus), a local saint who was founder and Abbot of the nearby monastery of Corbion in the 6th century..2) Pope Leo I, an influential early Pope.3) a figure that is either Ambrose or Thomas Becket .4) Nicholas, bishop of Myra (two of his miracles appear in the tympanum).The figure of Laumer was added after the rest of the portal was created. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • South Porch, Right Portal, Left Jambs. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statue of the four ?Confessors? important intellectual and spiritual leaders, most of whom lived during the early centuries of the Church. They stand on historiated socles- there are canopies offer their heads with architectural motifs. From left to right they are .1) Laumer (also called Lomer or Laudomarus), a local saint who was founder and Abbot of the nearby monastery of Corbion in the 6th century..2) Pope Leo I, an influential early Pope.3) a figure that is either Ambrose or Thomas Becket .4) Nicholas, bishop of Myra (two of his miracles appear in the tympanum).The figure of Laumer was added after the rest of the portal was created. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • South Porch, Right Portal, Left Jambs. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statue of the four ?Confessors? important intellectual and spiritual leaders, most of whom lived during the early centuries of the Church. They stand on historiated socles- there are canopies offer their heads with architectural motifs. From left to right they are .1) Laumer (also called Lomer or Laudomarus), a local saint who was founder and Abbot of the nearby monastery of Corbion in the 6th century..2) Pope Leo I, an influential early Pope.3) a figure that is either Ambrose or Thomas Becket .4) Nicholas, bishop of Myra (two of his miracles appear in the tympanum).The figure of Laumer was added after the rest of the portal was created. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Orthodox church tower of Panagia of Langouvarda at the foot of which The Virgin Mary's Snakes appear between August 5 and August 15.  Kefalonia, Greek Ionian Islands
  • The Orthodox church tower of Panagia of Langouvarda at the foot of which The Virgin Mary's Snakes appear between August 5 and August 15.  Kefalonia, Greek Ionian Islands
  • The Orthodox church tower of Panagia of Langouvarda at the foot of which The Virgin Mary's Snakes appear between August 5 and August 15.  Kefalonia, Greek Ionian Islands
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.      Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebastian relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.      Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background. <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background. <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.      Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Fresco of human figures around a deer. None of the figures carry weapons and some a dressed in leopard costumes. The figures seem to be trying to hold on or touch the deer amd one figure appears to be holding its tongue. 6000 BC, Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara.
  • Fresco of human figures around a deer. None of the figures carry weapons and some a dressed in leopard costumes. The figures seem to be trying to hold on or touch the deer amd one figure appears to be holding its tongue. 6000 BC, Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara.
  • Fresco of human figures around a deer. None of the figures carry weapons and some a dressed in leopard costumes. The figures seem to be trying to hold on or touch the deer amd one figure appears to be holding its tongue. 6000 BC, Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara.
  • Fresco of human figures around a deer. None of the figures carry weapons and some a dressed in leopard costumes. The figures seem to be trying to hold on or touch the deer amd one figure appears to be holding its tongue. 6000 BC, Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara.
  • Fresco of human figures around a deer. None of the figures carry weapons and some a dressed in leopard costumes. The figures seem to be trying to hold on or touch the deer amd one figure appears to be holding its tongue. 6000 BC, Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara.
  • Fresco of human figures around a deer. None of the figures carry weapons and some a dressed in leopard costumes. The figures seem to be trying to hold on or touch the deer amd one figure appears to be holding its tongue. 6000 BC, Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a white background
  • Fresco of human figures around a deer. None of the figures carry weapons and some a dressed in leopard costumes. The figures seem to be trying to hold on or touch the deer amd one figure appears to be holding its tongue. 6000 BC, Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a black background
  • Fresco of human figures around a deer. None of the figures carry weapons and some a dressed in leopard costumes. The figures seem to be trying to hold on or touch the deer amd one figure appears to be holding its tongue. 6000 BC, Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a grey background
  • Fresco of human figures around a deer. None of the figures carry weapons and some a dressed in leopard costumes. The figures seem to be trying to hold on or touch the deer amd one figure appears to be holding its tongue. 6000 BC, Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara.
  • Fresco of human figures around a deer. None of the figures carry weapons and some a dressed in leopard costumes. The figures seem to be trying to hold on or touch the deer amd one figure appears to be holding its tongue. 6000 BC, Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a gray mottled background
  • Wall fresco of geometric red and black triangles which appears to be a rug pattern copy. 6000 BC. . Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a white background
  • Wall fresco of geometric red and black triangles which appears to be a rug pattern copy. 6000 BC. . Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a grey background
  • Wall fresco of geometric red and black triangles which appears to be a rug pattern copy. 6000 BC. . Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara
  • Wall fresco of geometric red and black triangles which appears to be a rug pattern copy. 6000 BC. . Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a gray mottled background
  • Image of the Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • Photo of the Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • The Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a gray background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • Picture of the Hittite Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a grey art background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • The Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a brown art background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • The Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .    Against a grey background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a white background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   Against an art background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a grey background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against an art background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a white background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a black background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a grey background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a white background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).

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