• The Romanesque Altar Front of Baltarga<br />
<br />
Around 1200, Tempera on wood with metalic ornamention from the church of Saint Andreu (Andrew) of Baltarga, Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona. MNAC 15804<br />
<br />
The Romanesque paintings depict scenes from the life and the martyrdom of St. Andrew. At its centre is a theophany with Christ Pantocrator (Majesty) surrounded by a Mandorla around which is a tetramorph with the symbols of the four evangelists, St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle.. Eastern influences are especially evident in this magnificent altar frontal, which has an elegant palette of colours, with sophisticated soft flesh tones. The work seems most  likely to have come from the workshop of  highly skilled Greek painters,  which was installed in the vicinity of the monastery of Sant Marti Canigo and signed at least one of their works (now defunct) as Magister Alexander.
  • The Romanesque Altar Front of Baltarga<br />
<br />
Around 1200, Tempera on wood with metalic ornamention from the church of Saint Andreu (Andrew) of Baltarga, Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona. MNAC 15804<br />
<br />
The Romanesque paintings depict scenes from the life and the martyrdom of St. Andrew. At its centre is a theophany with Christ Pantocrator (Majesty) surrounded by a Mandorla around which is a tetramorph with the symbols of the four evangelists, St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle.. Eastern influences are especially evident in this magnificent altar frontal, which has an elegant palette of colours, with sophisticated soft flesh tones. The work seems most  likely to have come from the workshop of  highly skilled Greek painters,  which was installed in the vicinity of the monastery of Sant Marti Canigo and signed at least one of their works (now defunct) as Magister Alexander.
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelius was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Discus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Assyrian wall painting fragments depicting a winged bull and a procession of priests from Til Barsip, called 'Kar Salmansar' by King Shalmaneser III in the 9th century BC, now Tell Ahmar, located on the Euphrates in north Syria. From the rule of Telgat-pileser III (774-727 BC) and Ashurbanipal (662-627BC).  Louvre Museum , Paris
  • Assyrian wall painting fragments depicting the king and a Genie from Til Barsip, called 'Kar Salmansar' by King Shalmaneser III in the 9th century BC, now Tell Ahmar, located on the Euphrates in north Syria. From the rule of Telgat-pileser III (774-727 BC) and Ashurbanipal (662-627BC).  Louvre Museum , Paris
  • Assyrian wall painting fragments depicting Assyrian Charits from Til Barsip, called 'Kar Salmansar' by King Shalmaneser III in the 9th century BC, now Tell Ahmar, located on the Euphrates in north Syria. From the rule of Telgat-pileser III (774-727 BC) and Ashurbanipal (662-627BC).  Louvre Museum , Paris
  • Assyrian wall painting fragments depicting Assyrian Charits from Til Barsip, called 'Kar Salmansar' by King Shalmaneser III in the 9th century BC, now Tell Ahmar, located on the Euphrates in north Syria. From the rule of Telgat-pileser III (774-727 BC) and Ashurbanipal (662-627BC).  Louvre Museum , Paris
  • Gothic Catalan painted panel of the Banquet of Herod (Banquet d'Herodes) by Pere Garcia de Benvarri of Barcelona, Circa 1470, tempera and gold leaf on wood, from the church of Sant Joan (John) del Mercat de Lleida, Spain, National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC  64060. <br />
<br />
Pere Garcia, one of the most outstanding representatives of the Aragonese school of influence of flamenco, works for several Aragonese and Catalan centres. From the church of Sant Joan del Mercat in Lleida there are some tables of the old high altarpiece, a large piece of furniture dedicated to Bautista, partially preserved and one of the narrative chambers, the Banquet of Herod. This scene, in which Salome presents the head of St. John to Herod. <br />
<br />
The styling of the scene allows us to imagine how a festive banquet took place in a noble Catalan house in the second half of the fifteenth century.<br />
<br />
SPANISH<br />
<br />
Pere Garcia, uno de los representantes mas destacados de la escuela gotica aragonesa de influence flamenca, trabajo para varios centros aragoneses y catalanes. De la iglesia de Sant Joan del Mercat de Lleida proviennen algunas tablas del antiguo retablo mayor, un mueble de grandes dimensiones dedicado a Bautista, conservado parcialmente y del que se expone uno de los compartientos narrativos, el Banquet de Herodes. Esta escena, en la que Salome presenta la cabeza de san juan a Herodidias y Herodes, permite imaginar como transcurria un banquete festivo en una casa noble en la esgunda mitad del siglo XV
  • Medieval elephant ivory plaque with traces of paint made in Italy in the 13th or start of the 14th century.  The crucifixion is a rare example of a Gothic piece being inspired by 11th century Romanesque works.  inv 7268, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval gilded manuscript cover depicting the Crucifixion. 11th century from the treasury of the Cathedral of Maastricht. AD.  <br />
This gilded with relief panel with inlaid stones was originally a manuscript cover. Since 1677, it contained the 'documents of the oath of the Dukes of Brabant'. The back of the panel is covered with precious fabrics. On the front, in the central part, is depicted a crucifixion the style of which is reminiscent of the works of the goldsmiths of the Emperor Henry II. On the borders are small icons and emblems including those of the Carolingians. The main interest of this work lies in the four enamelled on gold symbols of the evangelists in the four corners, two being 'Enforced’ on a background of gold, the others being painted.<br />
<br />
One of Latin inscriptions states that 'Beatrice  ordered the execution ( of this work) in honour of Almighty God and his saints“. It could be Beatrice wife of Hermann II of Swabia and daughter Emperor's sister-Conrad II or, more likely, Beatrice of Tuscany who in 1036 was wife of Boniface III, Marquis of Tuscany, and second wife of Geoffrey the Bearded, Duke of Lower Lorraine and Brabant.<br />
 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval gilded manuscript cover depicting the Crucifixion. 11th century from the treasury of the Cathedral of Maastricht. AD.  <br />
This gilded with relief panel with inlaid stones was originally a manuscript cover. Since 1677, it contained the 'documents of the oath of the Dukes of Brabant'. The back of the panel is covered with precious fabrics. On the front, in the central part, is depicted a crucifixion the style of which is reminiscent of the works of the goldsmiths of the Emperor Henry II. On the borders are small icons and emblems including those of the Carolingians. The main interest of this work lies in the four enamelled on gold symbols of the evangelists in the four corners, two being 'Enforced’ on a background of gold, the others being painted.<br />
<br />
One of Latin inscriptions states that 'Beatrice  ordered the execution ( of this work) in honour of Almighty God and his saints“. It could be Beatrice wife of Hermann II of Swabia and daughter Emperor's sister-Conrad II or, more likely, Beatrice of Tuscany who in 1036 was wife of Boniface III, Marquis of Tuscany, and second wife of Geoffrey the Bearded, Duke of Lower Lorraine and Brabant.<br />
 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval gilded manuscript cover depicting the Crucifixion. 11th century from the treasury of the Cathedral of Maastricht. AD.  <br />
This gilded with relief panel with inlaid stones was originally a manuscript cover. Since 1677, it contained the 'documents of the oath of the Dukes of Brabant'. The back of the panel is covered with precious fabrics. On the front, in the central part, is depicted a crucifixion the style of which is reminiscent of the works of the goldsmiths of the Emperor Henry II. On the borders are small icons and emblems including those of the Carolingians. The main interest of this work lies in the four enamelled on gold symbols of the evangelists in the four corners, two being 'Enforced’ on a background of gold, the others being painted.<br />
<br />
One of Latin inscriptions states that 'Beatrice  ordered the execution ( of this work) in honour of Almighty God and his saints“. It could be Beatrice wife of Hermann II of Swabia and daughter Emperor's sister-Conrad II or, more likely, Beatrice of Tuscany who in 1036 was wife of Boniface III, Marquis of Tuscany, and second wife of Geoffrey the Bearded, Duke of Lower Lorraine and Brabant.<br />
 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval gilded manuscript cover depicting the Crucifixion. 11th century from the treasury of the Cathedral of Maastricht. AD.  <br />
This gilded with relief panel with inlaid stones was originally a manuscript cover. Since 1677, it contained the 'documents of the oath of the Dukes of Brabant'. The back of the panel is covered with precious fabrics. On the front, in the central part, is depicted a crucifixion the style of which is reminiscent of the works of the goldsmiths of the Emperor Henry II. On the borders are small icons and emblems including those of the Carolingians. The main interest of this work lies in the four enamelled on gold symbols of the evangelists in the four corners, two being 'Enforced’ on a background of gold, the others being painted.<br />
<br />
One of Latin inscriptions states that 'Beatrice  ordered the execution ( of this work) in honour of Almighty God and his saints“. It could be Beatrice wife of Hermann II of Swabia and daughter Emperor's sister-Conrad II or, more likely, Beatrice of Tuscany who in 1036 was wife of Boniface III, Marquis of Tuscany, and second wife of Geoffrey the Bearded, Duke of Lower Lorraine and Brabant.<br />
 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval gilded manuscript cover depicting the Crucifixion. 11th century from the treasury of the Cathedral of Maastricht. AD.  <br />
This gilded with relief panel with inlaid stones was originally a manuscript cover. Since 1677, it contained the 'documents of the oath of the Dukes of Brabant'. The back of the panel is covered with precious fabrics. On the front, in the central part, is depicted a crucifixion the style of which is reminiscent of the works of the goldsmiths of the Emperor Henry II. On the borders are small icons and emblems including those of the Carolingians. The main interest of this work lies in the four enamelled on gold symbols of the evangelists in the four corners, two being 'Enforced’ on a background of gold, the others being painted.<br />
<br />
One of Latin inscriptions states that 'Beatrice  ordered the execution ( of this work) in honour of Almighty God and his saints“. It could be Beatrice wife of Hermann II of Swabia and daughter Emperor's sister-Conrad II or, more likely, Beatrice of Tuscany who in 1036 was wife of Boniface III, Marquis of Tuscany, and second wife of Geoffrey the Bearded, Duke of Lower Lorraine and Brabant.<br />
 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval gilded manuscript cover depicting the Crucifixion. 11th century from the treasury of the Cathedral of Maastricht. AD.  <br />
This gilded with relief panel with inlaid stones was originally a manuscript cover. Since 1677, it contained the 'documents of the oath of the Dukes of Brabant'. The back of the panel is covered with precious fabrics. On the front, in the central part, is depicted a crucifixion the style of which is reminiscent of the works of the goldsmiths of the Emperor Henry II. On the borders are small icons and emblems including those of the Carolingians. The main interest of this work lies in the four enamelled on gold symbols of the evangelists in the four corners, two being 'Enforced’ on a background of gold, the others being painted.<br />
<br />
One of Latin inscriptions states that 'Beatrice  ordered the execution ( of this work) in honour of Almighty God and his saints“. It could be Beatrice wife of Hermann II of Swabia and daughter Emperor's sister-Conrad II or, more likely, Beatrice of Tuscany who in 1036 was wife of Boniface III, Marquis of Tuscany, and second wife of Geoffrey the Bearded, Duke of Lower Lorraine and Brabant.<br />
 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval gilded manuscript cover depicting the Crucifixion. 11th century from the treasury of the Cathedral of Maastricht. AD.  <br />
This gilded with relief panel with inlaid stones was originally a manuscript cover. Since 1677, it contained the 'documents of the oath of the Dukes of Brabant'. The back of the panel is covered with precious fabrics. On the front, in the central part, is depicted a crucifixion the style of which is reminiscent of the works of the goldsmiths of the Emperor Henry II. On the borders are small icons and emblems including those of the Carolingians. The main interest of this work lies in the four enamelled on gold symbols of the evangelists in the four corners, two being 'Enforced’ on a background of gold, the others being painted.<br />
<br />
One of Latin inscriptions states that 'Beatrice  ordered the execution ( of this work) in honour of Almighty God and his saints“. It could be Beatrice wife of Hermann II of Swabia and daughter Emperor's sister-Conrad II or, more likely, Beatrice of Tuscany who in 1036 was wife of Boniface III, Marquis of Tuscany, and second wife of Geoffrey the Bearded, Duke of Lower Lorraine and Brabant.<br />
 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval gilded manuscript cover depicting the Crucifixion. 11th century from the treasury of the Cathedral of Maastricht. AD.  <br />
This gilded with relief panel with inlaid stones was originally a manuscript cover. Since 1677, it contained the 'documents of the oath of the Dukes of Brabant'. The back of the panel is covered with precious fabrics. On the front, in the central part, is depicted a crucifixion the style of which is reminiscent of the works of the goldsmiths of the Emperor Henry II. On the borders are small icons and emblems including those of the Carolingians. The main interest of this work lies in the four enamelled on gold symbols of the evangelists in the four corners, two being 'Enforced’ on a background of gold, the others being painted.<br />
<br />
One of Latin inscriptions states that 'Beatrice  ordered the execution ( of this work) in honour of Almighty God and his saints“. It could be Beatrice wife of Hermann II of Swabia and daughter Emperor's sister-Conrad II or, more likely, Beatrice of Tuscany who in 1036 was wife of Boniface III, Marquis of Tuscany, and second wife of Geoffrey the Bearded, Duke of Lower Lorraine and Brabant.<br />
 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval gilded manuscript cover depicting the Crucifixion. 11th century from the treasury of the Cathedral of Maastricht. AD.  <br />
This gilded with relief panel with inlaid stones was originally a manuscript cover. Since 1677, it contained the 'documents of the oath of the Dukes of Brabant'. The back of the panel is covered with precious fabrics. On the front, in the central part, is depicted a crucifixion the style of which is reminiscent of the works of the goldsmiths of the Emperor Henry II. On the borders are small icons and emblems including those of the Carolingians. The main interest of this work lies in the four enamelled on gold symbols of the evangelists in the four corners, two being 'Enforced’ on a background of gold, the others being painted.<br />
<br />
One of Latin inscriptions states that 'Beatrice  ordered the execution ( of this work) in honour of Almighty God and his saints“. It could be Beatrice wife of Hermann II of Swabia and daughter Emperor's sister-Conrad II or, more likely, Beatrice of Tuscany who in 1036 was wife of Boniface III, Marquis of Tuscany, and second wife of Geoffrey the Bearded, Duke of Lower Lorraine and Brabant.<br />
 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval gilded manuscript cover depicting the Crucifixion. 11th century from the treasury of the Cathedral of Maastricht. AD.  <br />
This gilded with relief panel with inlaid stones was originally a manuscript cover. Since 1677, it contained the 'documents of the oath of the Dukes of Brabant'. The back of the panel is covered with precious fabrics. On the front, in the central part, is depicted a crucifixion the style of which is reminiscent of the works of the goldsmiths of the Emperor Henry II. On the borders are small icons and emblems including those of the Carolingians. The main interest of this work lies in the four enamelled on gold symbols of the evangelists in the four corners, two being 'Enforced’ on a background of gold, the others being painted.<br />
<br />
One of Latin inscriptions states that 'Beatrice  ordered the execution ( of this work) in honour of Almighty God and his saints“. It could be Beatrice wife of Hermann II of Swabia and daughter Emperor's sister-Conrad II or, more likely, Beatrice of Tuscany who in 1036 was wife of Boniface III, Marquis of Tuscany, and second wife of Geoffrey the Bearded, Duke of Lower Lorraine and Brabant.<br />
 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • 16th century flamboyant gothic Astrological Clock in the choir screen  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. The chancel screen includes, on the south side, an impressive astrological clock dating from the 16th century. It told not only the time but the day of the week, the month of the year, the time of sunrise and sunset, the phase of the moon and the current sign of the zodiac. Its inner works were partially destroyed in 1793.
  • 16th century flamboyant gothic Astrological Clock in the choir screen  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. The chancel screen includes, on the south side, an impressive astrological clock dating from the 16th century. It told not only the time but the day of the week, the month of the year, the time of sunrise and sunset, the phase of the moon and the current sign of the zodiac. Its inner works were partially destroyed in 1793.
  • 16th century flamboyant gothic Astrological Clock in the choir screen  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. The chancel screen includes, on the south side, an impressive astrological clock dating from the 16th century. It told not only the time but the day of the week, the month of the year, the time of sunrise and sunset, the phase of the moon and the current sign of the zodiac. Its inner works were partially destroyed in 1793.
  • 16th century flamboyant gothic Astrological Clock in the choir screen  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. The chancel screen includes, on the south side, an impressive astrological clock dating from the 16th century. It told not only the time but the day of the week, the month of the year, the time of sunrise and sunset, the phase of the moon and the current sign of the zodiac. Its inner works were partially destroyed in 1793.
  • 16th century flamboyant gothic Astrological Clock in the choir screen  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. The chancel screen includes, on the south side, an impressive astrological clock dating from the 16th century. It told not only the time but the day of the week, the month of the year, the time of sunrise and sunset, the phase of the moon and the current sign of the zodiac. Its inner works were partially destroyed in 1793.
  • 16th century flamboyant gothic Astrological Clock in the choir screen  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. The chancel screen includes, on the south side, an impressive astrological clock dating from the 16th century. It told not only the time but the day of the week, the month of the year, the time of sunrise and sunset, the phase of the moon and the current sign of the zodiac. Its inner works were partially destroyed in 1793.
  • Limestone Sculpted relief Stele with inscription to King Sennacherib. The relief shows Assyrian King Sennacherib  praying in front of divine symbols. 705 - 681 B.C Nineveh ( Kuyunjik ) . The inscription tells of King Sennacherib's great feats of war and the building works in Nineveh. It starts " Sennacheribs, the great king, mighty king, king of the universe, king of the Assyria, king of the four regions of the wold, favourite of the great gods". It continues " I led my armies from one end of the earth to the other and brought in submission at my feet all princes, dwelling in palaces, of the four quarters of the world". of his great worked " I enlarged the site of Nineveh, my royal city, I made its market streets wider". further " The wall and outer wall I caused skilfully constructed and raised them mountain high. I widened them to 100 cubits ( 50m )". Istanbul Archaeological Exhibit no. 1.
  • The Romanesque Altar Front of Baltarga<br />
<br />
Around 1200, Tempera on wood with metalic ornamention from the church of Saint Andreu (Andrew) of Baltarga, Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona. MNAC 15804<br />
<br />
The Romanesque paintings depict scenes from the life and the martyrdom of St. Andrew. At its centre is a theophany with Christ Pantocrator (Majesty) surrounded by a Mandorla around which is a tetramorph with the symbols of the four evangelists, St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle.. Eastern influences are especially evident in this magnificent altar frontal, which has an elegant palette of colours, with sophisticated soft flesh tones. The work seems most  likely to have come from the workshop of  highly skilled Greek painters,  which was installed in the vicinity of the monastery of Sant Marti Canigo and signed at least one of their works (now defunct) as Magister Alexander.
  • The Romanesque Altar Front of Baltarga<br />
<br />
Around 1200, Tempera on wood with metalic ornamention from the church of Saint Andreu (Andrew) of Baltarga, Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona. MNAC 15804<br />
<br />
The Romanesque paintings depict scenes from the life and the martyrdom of St. Andrew. At its centre is a theophany with Christ Pantocrator (Majesty) surrounded by a Mandorla around which is a tetramorph with the symbols of the four evangelists, St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle.. Eastern influences are especially evident in this magnificent altar frontal, which has an elegant palette of colours, with sophisticated soft flesh tones. The work seems most  likely to have come from the workshop of  highly skilled Greek painters,  which was installed in the vicinity of the monastery of Sant Marti Canigo and signed at least one of their works (now defunct) as Magister Alexander.
  • The Romanesque Altar Front of Baltarga<br />
<br />
Around 1200, Tempera on wood with metalic ornamention from the church of Saint Andreu (Andrew) of Baltarga, Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona. MNAC 15804<br />
<br />
The Romanesque paintings depict scenes from the life and the martyrdom of St. Andrew. At its centre is a theophany with Christ Pantocrator (Majesty) surrounded by a Mandorla around which is a tetramorph with the symbols of the four evangelists, St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle.. Eastern influences are especially evident in this magnificent altar frontal, which has an elegant palette of colours, with sophisticated soft flesh tones. The work seems most  likely to have come from the workshop of  highly skilled Greek painters,  which was installed in the vicinity of the monastery of Sant Marti Canigo and signed at least one of their works (now defunct) as Magister Alexander.
  • The Romanesque Altar Front of Baltarga<br />
<br />
Around 1200, Tempera on wood with metalic ornamention from the church of Saint Andreu (Andrew) of Baltarga, Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona. MNAC 15804<br />
<br />
The Romanesque paintings depict scenes from the life and the martyrdom of St. Andrew. At its centre is a theophany with Christ Pantocrator (Majesty) surrounded by a Mandorla around which is a tetramorph with the symbols of the four evangelists, St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle.. Eastern influences are especially evident in this magnificent altar frontal, which has an elegant palette of colours, with sophisticated soft flesh tones. The work seems most  likely to have come from the workshop of  highly skilled Greek painters,  which was installed in the vicinity of the monastery of Sant Marti Canigo and signed at least one of their works (now defunct) as Magister Alexander.
  • The Romanesque Altar Front of Baltarga<br />
<br />
Around 1200, Tempera on wood with metalic ornamention from the church of Saint Andreu (Andrew) of Baltarga, Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona. MNAC 15804<br />
<br />
The Romanesque paintings depict scenes from the life and the martyrdom of St. Andrew. At its centre is a theophany with Christ Pantocrator (Majesty) surrounded by a Mandorla around which is a tetramorph with the symbols of the four evangelists, St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle.. Eastern influences are especially evident in this magnificent altar frontal, which has an elegant palette of colours, with sophisticated soft flesh tones. The work seems most  likely to have come from the workshop of  highly skilled Greek painters,  which was installed in the vicinity of the monastery of Sant Marti Canigo and signed at least one of their works (now defunct) as Magister Alexander.
  • The Romanesque Altar Front of Baltarga<br />
<br />
Around 1200, Tempera on wood with metalic ornamention from the church of Saint Andreu (Andrew) of Baltarga, Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona. MNAC 15804<br />
<br />
The Romanesque paintings depict scenes from the life and the martyrdom of St. Andrew. At its centre is a theophany with Christ Pantocrator (Majesty) surrounded by a Mandorla around which is a tetramorph with the symbols of the four evangelists, St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle.. Eastern influences are especially evident in this magnificent altar frontal, which has an elegant palette of colours, with sophisticated soft flesh tones. The work seems most  likely to have come from the workshop of  highly skilled Greek painters,  which was installed in the vicinity of the monastery of Sant Marti Canigo and signed at least one of their works (now defunct) as Magister Alexander.
  • The Romanesque Altar Front of Baltarga<br />
<br />
Around 1200, Tempera on wood with metalic ornamention from the church of Saint Andreu (Andrew) of Baltarga, Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona. MNAC 15804<br />
<br />
The Romanesque paintings depict scenes from the life and the martyrdom of St. Andrew. At its centre is a theophany with Christ Pantocrator (Majesty) surrounded by a Mandorla around which is a tetramorph with the symbols of the four evangelists, St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle.. Eastern influences are especially evident in this magnificent altar frontal, which has an elegant palette of colours, with sophisticated soft flesh tones. The work seems most  likely to have come from the workshop of  highly skilled Greek painters,  which was installed in the vicinity of the monastery of Sant Marti Canigo and signed at least one of their works (now defunct) as Magister Alexander.
  • The Romanesque Altar Front of Baltarga<br />
<br />
Around 1200, Tempera on wood with metalic ornamention from the church of Saint Andreu (Andrew) of Baltarga, Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona. MNAC 15804<br />
<br />
The Romanesque paintings depict scenes from the life and the martyrdom of St. Andrew. At its centre is a theophany with Christ Pantocrator (Majesty) surrounded by a Mandorla around which is a tetramorph with the symbols of the four evangelists, St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle.. Eastern influences are especially evident in this magnificent altar frontal, which has an elegant palette of colours, with sophisticated soft flesh tones. The work seems most  likely to have come from the workshop of  highly skilled Greek painters,  which was installed in the vicinity of the monastery of Sant Marti Canigo and signed at least one of their works (now defunct) as Magister Alexander.
  • The Romanesque Altar Front of Baltarga<br />
<br />
Around 1200, Tempera on wood with metalic ornamention from the church of Saint Andreu (Andrew) of Baltarga, Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona. MNAC 15804<br />
<br />
The Romanesque paintings depict scenes from the life and the martyrdom of St. Andrew. At its centre is a theophany with Christ Pantocrator (Majesty) surrounded by a Mandorla around which is a tetramorph with the symbols of the four evangelists, St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle.. Eastern influences are especially evident in this magnificent altar frontal, which has an elegant palette of colours, with sophisticated soft flesh tones. The work seems most  likely to have come from the workshop of  highly skilled Greek painters,  which was installed in the vicinity of the monastery of Sant Marti Canigo and signed at least one of their works (now defunct) as Magister Alexander.
  • The Romanesque Altar Front of Baltarga<br />
<br />
Around 1200, Tempera on wood with metalic ornamention from the church of Saint Andreu (Andrew) of Baltarga, Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona. MNAC 15804<br />
<br />
The Romanesque paintings depict scenes from the life and the martyrdom of St. Andrew. At its centre is a theophany with Christ Pantocrator (Majesty) surrounded by a Mandorla around which is a tetramorph with the symbols of the four evangelists, St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle.. Eastern influences are especially evident in this magnificent altar frontal, which has an elegant palette of colours, with sophisticated soft flesh tones. The work seems most  likely to have come from the workshop of  highly skilled Greek painters,  which was installed in the vicinity of the monastery of Sant Marti Canigo and signed at least one of their works (now defunct) as Magister Alexander.
  • Medieval elephant ivory plaque with traces of paint made in Italy in the 13th or start of the 14th century.  The crucifixion is a rare example of a Gothic piece being inspired by 11th century Romanesque works.  inv 7268, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a bronze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a bronze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a bronze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a bronze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a bronze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a braze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a braze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a braze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a braze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a braze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Discus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Medieval elephant ivory plaque with traces of paint made in Italy in the 13th or start of the 14th century.  The crucifixion is a rare example of a Gothic piece being inspired by 11th century Romanesque works.  inv 7268, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval elephant ivory plaque with traces of paint made in Italy in the 13th or start of the 14th century.  The crucifixion is a rare example of a Gothic piece being inspired by 11th century Romanesque works.  inv 7268, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval elephant ivory plaque with traces of paint made in Italy in the 13th or start of the 14th century.  The crucifixion is a rare example of a Gothic piece being inspired by 11th century Romanesque works.  inv 7268, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval elephant ivory plaque with traces of paint made in Italy in the 13th or start of the 14th century.  The crucifixion is a rare example of a Gothic piece being inspired by 11th century Romanesque works.  inv 7268, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval elephant ivory plaque with traces of paint made in Italy in the 13th or start of the 14th century.  The crucifixion is a rare example of a Gothic piece being inspired by 11th century Romanesque works.  inv 7268, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval elephant ivory plaque with traces of paint made in Italy in the 13th or start of the 14th century.  The crucifixion is a rare example of a Gothic piece being inspired by 11th century Romanesque works.  inv 7268, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval elephant ivory plaque with traces of paint made in Italy in the 13th or start of the 14th century.  The crucifixion is a rare example of a Gothic piece being inspired by 11th century Romanesque works.  inv 7268, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval elephant ivory plaque with traces of paint made in Italy in the 13th or start of the 14th century.  The crucifixion is a rare example of a Gothic piece being inspired by 11th century Romanesque works.  inv 7268, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • West Facade, right Royal Portal - General View of Tympanum c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Tympanum - Virgin and Child enthroned, flanked by angels..Upper Lintel - the Presentation at the Temple.Lower Lintel - Nativity Scenes (The Annunciation to the Virgin, the Visitation, the Nativity, Annunciation to the Shepherds).Inner archivolt - angels..Outer archivolts - Liberal Arts and their associated scribes. (See discussion in Katzenellenbogen, pp. 15-21 and in Kidson, pp. 20-1). On the bottom left are the Zodiac signs of Pisces and Gemini . A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • West Facade, right Royal Portal - General View of Tympanum c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Tympanum - Virgin and Child enthroned, flanked by angels..Upper Lintel - the Presentation at the Temple.Lower Lintel - Nativity Scenes (The Annunciation to the Virgin, the Visitation, the Nativity, Annunciation to the Shepherds).Inner archivolt - angels..Outer archivolts - Liberal Arts and their associated scribes. (See discussion in Katzenellenbogen, pp. 15-21 and in Kidson, pp. 20-1). On the bottom left are the Zodiac signs of Pisces and Gemini . A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • West Facade, right Royal Portal - General View of Tympanum c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Tympanum - Virgin and Child enthroned, flanked by angels..Upper Lintel - the Presentation at the Temple.Lower Lintel - Nativity Scenes (The Annunciation to the Virgin, the Visitation, the Nativity, Annunciation to the Shepherds).Inner archivolt - angels..Outer archivolts - Liberal Arts and their associated scribes. (See discussion in Katzenellenbogen, pp. 15-21 and in Kidson, pp. 20-1). On the bottom left are the Zodiac signs of Pisces and Gemini . A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • West Facade, right Royal Portal - General View of Tympanum c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Tympanum - Virgin and Child enthroned, flanked by angels..Upper Lintel - the Presentation at the Temple.Lower Lintel - Nativity Scenes (The Annunciation to the Virgin, the Visitation, the Nativity, Annunciation to the Shepherds).Inner archivolt - angels..Outer archivolts - Liberal Arts and their associated scribes. (See discussion in Katzenellenbogen, pp. 15-21 and in Kidson, pp. 20-1). On the bottom left are the Zodiac signs of Pisces and Gemini . A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • Gothic statues  from the South Porch of Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Gothic sculpted columns from the Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • North Porch, Central Portal, right Jambs- General View c. 1194-1230. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues of figures of, from left 1) Isaiah 2) Jeremiah 3) Simeon holding the Christ Child. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • West Facade, Central Portal - Right Jamb Figures- General View c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues of figures. The group to the left some scholars believe that the jamb figures are the ancestors of Christ.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • South Porch left jam. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statue of from left to right, they are Matthew , Thomas, Philip (with sword), Andrew (with cross) and Peter (with cross and keys),  A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • South Porch left jam. Gothic statue of (left) Andrew and Peter with cross and keys. Cathedral of Chartres, France.  A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval Gothic Sculptures of the South portal  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. The portal shaows the Last Judgement and the small figures represent "The blessed". A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval Gothic Sculptures of the South portal  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. The portal shaows the Last Judgement and the small figures represent "The blessed". A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Sculpture of Our Lady of The Pillar, Chartre Cathedral, France
  • Candles in the Cathedral of Notre Dame, Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Gothic statues  from the Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Gothic statues  from the North porch of Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Gothic statues  from the North porch of Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Gothic statues  from the North porch of Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Gothic statues  from the North porch of Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Gothic statues  from the North porch of Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Gothic statues  from the Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Gothic statues  from the South Porch of Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Gothic statues  from the South Porch of Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Gothic statues  from the South Porch of Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Gothic statues  from the South Porch of Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Gothic statues  from the South Porch of Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Gothic statues  from the South Porch of Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Gothic statues  from the South Porch of Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Gothic statues  from the South Porch of Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Gothic statues  from the South Porch of Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Gothic statues  from the South Porch of Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Gothic statues  from the South Porch of Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • .West Facade, right Portal, left jam c. 1145,  Cathedral of Notre Dame, Chartres, France. Gothic statues of four elongated human figures. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • .West Facade, central Portal c. 1145,  Cathedral of Notre Dame, Chartres, France. Gothic statues of four elongated human figures with halos. The leftmost is a bearded man holding a book. The next is a crowned man with long hair and a beard also holding a book. The next is a crowned female with elaborate garments. The rightmost is a bearded, crowned man holding a scroll. Some scholars believe that the jamb figures are the ancestors of Christ.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • .West Facade, Left Portal c. 1145,  Cathedral of Notre Dame, Chartres, France. Gothic statues of three elongated jamb statues are on the left side of the left portal. All have canopies and stand on figural bases. All hold books or scrolls. Their height increases from left to right. Note the figured columns between them.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • South Porch, central Portal c. 1194-1230,  Cathedral of Notre Dame, Chartres, France. Gothic statues of from left to right they are .Paul, John, James Major and James Minor. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • South Porch, central Portal c. 1194-1230,  Cathedral of Notre Dame, Chartres, France. Gothic statues of from left to right they are .Paul, John and James Major A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • .South Porch, Right Portal c. 1194-1230,  Cathedral of Notre Dame, Chartres, France. Gothic statues of from left to right they are .Statues- Martin, Jerome and Gregory. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • .South Porch, Right Portal, Left Jambs c. 1194-1230,  Cathedral of Notre Dame, Chartres, France. From left to right they are .1) Laumer (also called Lomer or Laudomarus), a local saint who was founder and Abbot of the nearby monastery of Corbion in the 6th century..2) Pope Leo I, an influential early Pope.3) a figure that is either Ambrose or Thomas Becket . A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • .South Porch, Right Portal c. 1194-1230,  Cathedral of Notre Dame, Chartres, France. Gothic statues of from left to right they are .Statues- Martin, Jerome , Gregory and Avit . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Gothic statues holding a sundial from the Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Gothic sculpted illustrated column capitals  from the Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • Gothic sculpted illustrated column capitals  from the Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • Gothic sculpted illustrated column capitals  from the Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • Gothic sculpted illustrated column capitals  from the Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • Gothic sculpted illustrated column capitals  from the Cathedral of Chartres, France. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • North Porch, Left Portal (Incarnation Portal), Tympanum- Gifts of the Magi and Dream of the Magi c 1194-1230, from the Cathedral of Chartres, France. At left is the Adoration of the Magi (Matthew 2:1)..Two Magi (crowned) stand at left, holding jars. One has a beard and the other is clean-shaven. The third Magus (bearded) kneels, handing a round object to the Christ Child, who sits on Mary's lap in the middle of the composition. Above them is the star of Bethlehem between two angels holding scrolls..At right is the Dream of the Magi. (Matthew 2:12).Two of the Magi (bearded, still crowned) lie sleeping on a bed at the lower right. The third Magus (beardless) appears behind them, with his eyes closed and his head propped up in his hand. Above is an angel with a scroll, one of the pair of angels who flank the star of Bethlehem at the top of the tympanum..Surrounding the central scene is the Inner archivolt. It contains angels holding candlesticks standing on clouds. Below The Virgin Mary (veiled) lies on a bed that is parallel to the panel plane. She raises one hand. The Christ Child (in swaddling clothes) is in a manger above the bed. Above him are the heads of the ox and the ass. They are probably a reference to Old Testament verses thought to be prophecies of the coming of the Messiah. Isaiah 1:3 says, "The ox knows his owner and the ass his maker's crib." There is a similar verse in Habakkuk. The apocryphal Protevangelium of James mentions only the ass. The Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew also says that an ox and an ass worshiped the Christ Child in the manger..Above are angels leaning out of a cloud and holding a long scroll.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • .South Porch, Right Portal archivolts c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statues of the archivolts on the lower register of archivolts are miracles of Gilles, including the Mass of St. Gilles (right). The other archivolts show various Confessors.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • Gothic Archivolts from the Cathedral of Chartres, France.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • West Facade, Left Portal archivolts c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic sculpture of the archivolts on which are the Signs of the Zodiac, this one is Scorpio the crab . See Fassler, pp 507-10.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • .South Porch, Right Portal archivolts c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statues of the archivolts on the lower register of archivolts are miracles of Gilles, including the Mass of St. Gilles (right). The other archivolts show various Confessors.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • West Facade, Left Portal archivolts c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statues of the archivolts on which are the Signs of the Zodiac and the Labors of the Months. See Fassler, pp 507-10.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • West Facade, Left Portal archivolts c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statues of the archivolts on which are the Signs of the Zodiac and the Labors of the Months. See Fassler, pp 507-10.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • North Porch, Central Portal, Right Archivolts c. 1194-1230. Cathedral of Chartres, France. The Jesse Tree shows the genealogy of Christ, based on the words of Isaiah's prophecy (Isaiah 11:1 " And there shall come forth a rod out of the root of Jesse, and a flower shall rise up out of his root.") The Innermost archivolt contains angels. The second and fifth archivolts from the centre contains Old Testament prophets, many nimbed and holding scrolls. The third and fourth archivolts contain seated figures of the royal ancestors of Christ, surrounded by foliage of the Jesse Tree. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • North Porch, Central Portal, left Archivolts c. 1194-1230. Cathedral of Chartres, France. The Jesse Tree shows the genealogy of Christ, based on the words of Isaiah's prophecy (Isaiah 11:1 " And there shall come forth a rod out of the root of Jesse, and a flower shall rise up out of his root.") The Innermost archivolt contains angels. The second and fifth archivolts from the centre contains Old Testament prophets, many nimbed and holding scrolls. The third and fourth archivolts contain seated figures of the royal ancestors of Christ, surrounded by foliage of the Jesse Tree. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • North Porch, Central Portal, Right Archivolts c. 1194-1230. Cathedral of Chartres, France. The Jesse Tree shows the genealogy of Christ, based on the words of Isaiah's prophecy (Isaiah 11:1 " And there shall come forth a rod out of the root of Jesse, and a flower shall rise up out of his root.") The Innermost archivolt contains angels. The second and fifth archivolts from the centre contains Old Testament prophets, many nimbed and holding scrolls. The third and fourth archivolts contain seated figures of the royal ancestors of Christ, surrounded by foliage of the Jesse Tree. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • West Facade, Central Portal, Archivolts- Right c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues of figures, from  the center the inner archivolt contains figures of angels standing on clouds. They hold round objects. (Perhaps these are wheels- the symbol for the Thrones, one of the choirs of angels described in Old Testament Book of Ezekiel 1:13-19. - JV) .The outer archivolts (right) contain figures of the Elders of the Apocalypse (Apocalypse, Chapter 4). They are depicted as bearded, haloed men wearing crowns seated on thrones. Each holds a musical instrument (Apocalypse, 5:8). A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • West Facade, Central Portal, Archivolts- Right c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues of figures, from  the center the inner archivolt contains figures of angels standing on clouds. They hold round objects. (Perhaps these are wheels- the symbol for the Thrones, one of the choirs of angels described in Old Testament Book of Ezekiel 1:13-19. - JV) .The outer archivolts (right) contain figures of the Elders of the Apocalypse (Apocalypse, Chapter 4). They are depicted as bearded, haloed men wearing crowns seated on thrones. Each holds a musical instrument (Apocalypse, 5:8). A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • West Facade, Central Portal, Archivolts- Right c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues of figures, from  the center the inner archivolt contains figures of angels standing on clouds. They hold round objects. (Perhaps these are wheels- the symbol for the Thrones, one of the choirs of angels described in Old Testament Book of Ezekiel 1:13-19. - JV) .The outer archivolts (right) contain figures of the Elders of the Apocalypse (Apocalypse, Chapter 4). They are depicted as bearded, haloed men wearing crowns seated on thrones. Each holds a musical instrument (Apocalypse, 5:8). A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • North Porch, Central Portal, right Jambs- General View c. 1194-1230. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues of figures, from left,  of Isaiah. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • North Porch, Central Portal, right Jambs- General View c. 1194-1230. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues of figures, from left,  of  Simeon holding the Christ Child. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • North Porch, Central Portal, right Jambs- General View c. 1194-1230. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues of figures, from left,  of  John the Baptist holding the Agnus Dei. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • North Porch, Central Portal, right Jambs- General View c. 1194-1230. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues of figures, from left,  of  John the Baptist holding the Agnus Dei. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • North Porch, Central Portal, right Jambs- General View c. 1194-1230. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues of figures, from left,  of Simeon holding the Christ Child and  John the Baptist holding the Agnus Dei. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • North Porch, Central Portal, right Jambs- General View c. 1194-1230. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues of figures of Jeremiah. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • North Porch, Central Portal, right Jambs- General View c. 1194-1230. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues of figures of, from left Isaiah and Jeremiah. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • North Porch, Central Portal, left Jambs- General View c. 1194-1230. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues of figures, from  the Old-Testament Priest/King Melchisedech holding a cup. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • North Porch, Central Portal, Left Jambs- General View c. 1194-1230. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues of figures of, from left 1) the Old-Testament Priest/King Melchisedech holding a cup and Moses with the brazen serpent and the tablets of the Law. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • North Porch, Central Portal, left Jambs- General View c. 1194-1230. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues of figures, from the left.1) the Old-Testament Priest/King Melchisedech holding a cup..2) Abraham sacrificing Isaac.3) Moses with the brazen serpent and the tablets of the Law.4) Samuel, sacrificing a lamb.5) King David.This portal was cleaned in the 1990's. The cleaning uncovered the yellowish sizing material that at one time served as a base for the paint and gilding which once decorated the figures.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • West Facade, Central Portal - Right Jamb Figures- General View c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues of figures. The group to the left some scholars believe that the jamb figures are the ancestors of Christ.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • West Facade, Central Portal - Right Jamb Figures- General View c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues of figures. The group to the left some scholars believe that the jamb figures are the ancestors of Christ.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • West Facade, Central Portal - Right Jamb Figures- General View c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues of figures. The group to the left some scholars believe that the jamb figures are the ancestors of Christ.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • West Facade, Central Portal - Right Jamb Figures- General View c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues of figures. The group to the left some scholars believe that the jamb figures are the ancestors of Christ.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • West Facade, Central Portal - Right Jamb Figures- General View c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues of figures that some scholars believe that the jamb figures are the ancestors of Christ.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • West Facade, Central Portal - Right Jamb Figures- General View c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues of figures that some scholars believe that the jamb figures are the ancestors of Christ.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • West Facade, Central Portal - Left Jamb Figures c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Gothic statues on the left jamb of the central portal. All have haloes. The leftmost is a crowned woman whose hair is in long plaits; she holds a book. The central figure is a bearded man in a cap that resembles the ones worn by other jamb figures and by figures in the tympanum of the right portal. He holds an unidentified object. The figure nearest the portal is a bearded man holding a scroll and raising one hand- palm outwards- towards the viewer. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • West Facade, Left Portal - General View of Tympanum c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . The tympanum of the left door shows the Ascension or the Second Coming. Christ (crossed halo) stands on a cloud, supported by two angels. Below are four angels (descending from the clouds?) Some of them have their mouths open (singing?). On the lintel below are ten seated men holding books or scrolls and looking upward (apostles?). On the archivolts are the Signs of the Zodiac and the Labors of the Months.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • West Facade, Left Portal - General View of Tympanum c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . The tympanum of the left door shows the Ascension or the Second Coming. Christ (crossed halo) stands on a cloud, supported by two angels. Below are four angels (descending from the clouds?) Some of them have their mouths open (singing?). On the lintel below are ten seated men holding books or scrolls and looking upward (apostles?). On the archivolts are the Signs of the Zodiac and the Labors of the Months.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • West Facade, Left Portal - General View of Tympanum c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . The tympanum of the left door shows the Ascension or the Second Coming. Christ (crossed halo) stands on a cloud, supported by two angels. Below are four angels (descending from the clouds?) Some of them have their mouths open (singing?). On the lintel below are ten seated men holding books or scrolls and looking upward (apostles?). On the archivolts are the Signs of the Zodiac and the Labors of the Months.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • West Facade, Left Portal - General View of Tympanum c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . The tympanum of the left door shows the Ascension or the Second Coming. Christ (crossed halo) stands on a cloud, supported by two angels. Below are four angels (descending from the clouds?) Some of them have their mouths open (singing?). On the lintel below are ten seated men holding books or scrolls and looking upward (apostles?). On the archivolts are the Signs of the Zodiac and the Labors of the Months.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • West Facade, Central Portal Lintel - General View c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . The lintel shows gothic sculptures of the twelve apostles. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • West Facade, Central Portal Tympanum - General View c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . The tympanum shows gothic sculptures of Jesus Christ in Majesty surrounded by the four Evangelist Symbols. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • West Facade, Central Portal Tympanum - General View c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . The tympanum shows gothic sculptures of Jesus Christ in Majesty surrounded by the four Evangelist Symbols. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • West Facade, Central Portal Tympanum - General View c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . The tympanum shows gothic sculptures of Christ in Majesty surrounded by the four Evangelist Symbols. The inner archivolt contains angels. On the two outer archivolts are the twenty-four elders of the Apocalypse. On the lintel are the twelve Apostles flanked by two other figures holding scrolls (Elisha and Enoch?). A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • West Facade, Central Portal Tympanum - General View c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . The tympanum shows gothic sculptures of Christ in Majesty surrounded by the four Evangelist Symbols. The inner archivolt contains angels. On the two outer archivolts are the twenty-four elders of the Apocalypse. On the lintel are the twelve Apostles flanked by two other figures holding scrolls (Elisha and Enoch?). A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • West Facade, Central Portal Tympanum - General View c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . The tympanum shows gothic sculptures of Christ in Majesty surrounded by the four Evangelist Symbols. The inner archivolt contains angels. On the two outer archivolts are the twenty-four elders of the Apocalypse. On the lintel are the twelve Apostles flanked by two other figures holding scrolls (Elisha and Enoch?). A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • West Facade, Central Portal Tympanum - General View c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . The tympanum shows gothic sculptures of Christ in Majesty surrounded by the four Evangelist Symbols. The inner archivolt contains angels. On the two outer archivolts are the twenty-four elders of the Apocalypse. On the lintel are the twelve Apostles flanked by two other figures holding scrolls (Elisha and Enoch?). A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • West Facade, Central Portal Tympanum - General View c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . The tympanum shows gothic sculptures of Christ in Majesty surrounded by the four Evangelist Symbols. The inner archivolt contains angels. On the two outer archivolts are the twenty-four elders of the Apocalypse. On the lintel are the twelve Apostles flanked by two other figures holding scrolls (Elisha and Enoch?). A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • West Facade, Central Portal Tympanum - General View c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . The tympanum shows gothic sculptures of Christ in Majesty surrounded by the four Evangelist Symbols. The inner archivolt contains angels. On the two outer archivolts are the twenty-four elders of the Apocalypse. On the lintel are the twelve Apostles flanked by two other figures holding scrolls (Elisha and Enoch?). A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • South Porch, Right Portal, Left Jambs. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statue of the four ?Confessors? important intellectual and spiritual leaders, most of whom lived during the early centuries of the Church. They stand on historiated socles- there are canopies offer their heads with architectural motifs. From left to right they are .1) Laumer (also called Lomer or Laudomarus), a local saint who was founder and Abbot of the nearby monastery of Corbion in the 6th century..2) Pope Leo I, an influential early Pope.3) a figure that is either Ambrose or Thomas Becket .4) Nicholas, bishop of Myra (two of his miracles appear in the tympanum).The figure of Laumer was added after the rest of the portal was created. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • South Porch, Right Portal, Left Jambs. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statue of the four ?Confessors? important intellectual and spiritual leaders, most of whom lived during the early centuries of the Church. They stand on historiated socles- there are canopies offer their heads with architectural motifs. From left to right they are .1) Laumer (also called Lomer or Laudomarus), a local saint who was founder and Abbot of the nearby monastery of Corbion in the 6th century..2) Pope Leo I, an influential early Pope.3) a figure that is either Ambrose or Thomas Becket .4) Nicholas, bishop of Myra (two of his miracles appear in the tympanum).The figure of Laumer was added after the rest of the portal was created. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • South Porch, Right Portal, Left Jambs. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statue of the four ?Confessors? important intellectual and spiritual leaders, most of whom lived during the early centuries of the Church. They stand on historiated socles- there are canopies offer their heads with architectural motifs. From left to right they are .1) Laumer (also called Lomer or Laudomarus), a local saint who was founder and Abbot of the nearby monastery of Corbion in the 6th century..2) Pope Leo I, an influential early Pope.3) a figure that is either Ambrose or Thomas Becket .4) Nicholas, bishop of Myra (two of his miracles appear in the tympanum).The figure of Laumer was added after the rest of the portal was created. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • South Porch right jam. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statue of the Apostles (haloed, carrying the instruments of their deaths). From left to right they are Paul (characteristic facial features, carrying a sword) , John (beardless, carrying a book and what Houvet says is part of a palm frond) , James Major (carrying a sword and a pilgrim's pouch) , James Minor (carrying a club) , Bartholomew. On the socles on which they stand are their persecutors, mostly crowned figures holding scrolls and looking upward. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • South Porch right jam. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statue of the Apostles (haloed, carrying the instruments of their deaths). From left to right they are Paul (characteristic facial features, carrying a sword) , John (beardless, carrying a book and what Houvet says is part of a palm frond) , James Major (carrying a sword and a pilgrim's pouch) , James Minor (carrying a club) , Bartholomew. On the socles on which they stand are their persecutors, mostly crowned figures holding scrolls and looking upward. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • South Porch right jam. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statue of the Apostles (haloed, carrying the instruments of their deaths). From left to right they are Paul (characteristic facial features, carrying a sword) , John (beardless, carrying a book and what Houvet says is part of a palm frond) , James Major (carrying a sword and a pilgrim's pouch) , James Minor (carrying a club) , Bartholomew. On the socles on which they stand are their persecutors, mostly crowned figures holding scrolls and looking upward. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • South Porch left jam. Gothic statue of Philip with sword. Cathedral of Chartres, France.  A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • South Porch left jam. Gothic statue of Philip with sword. Cathedral of Chartres, France.  A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • South Porch left jam. Gothic statue of Philip with sword. Cathedral of Chartres, France.  A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • South Porch, left Portal, Tympanum- General View.This portal is dedicated to the Confessors. Cathedral of Chartres, France. The tympanum, lintel and lower archivolts contain depictions of episodes in the martyrdom of Stephen. Christ between two kneeling angels. This is usually identified as the vision that Stephen saw during his martyrdom. Stephen saw Christ "standing at the right hand of God", and in this depiction, Christ is standing. .Lintel: Stephen led to his martyrdom (left) and the Stoning of Stephen (right). Archivolts: .Lowest register - More incidents in the Martyrdom of Stephen. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. ..
  • South Porch, Left Portal (Martyrs). Archivolts - Stephen Disputes with the Jews (Acts 6:9). Cathedral of Chartres, France.  A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • South Porch, Right Portal, Tympanum- General View.This portal is dedicated to the Confessors. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Tympanum and Lintel: Miracles by two very popular saints, Martin and Nicholas, are shown on the tympanum and lintel. Both saints have figures on the jambs below and several windows in the interior lower level and clerestory..On the left is the Miracle of Martin's cloak. In the lower left panel, Martin, a young Roman stationed in Amiens, met a beggar at the city gate one cold day. Moved by the man's suffering, Martin cut his cloak in half and gave him one of the pieces. In the upper left panel, Martin is shown sleeping. His dream is shown on the tympanum; Christ appears wearing the piece of the cloak he gave to the beggar, who had really been Christ..On the right are miracles of Nicholas. In the bottom panel, Nicholas anonymously gives dowries to three indigent girls. On the upper right, pilgrims at Nicholas's tomb, which supposedly gave off a miraculous healing fluid. .Archivolts: .On the lower register of archivolts are miracles of Gilles, including the Mass of St. Gilles (right). The other archivolts show various Confessors.A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • South Porch, Right Portal, Tympanum- General View.This portal is dedicated to the Confessors. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Tympanum and Lintel: Miracles by two very popular saints, Martin and Nicholas, are shown on the tympanum and lintel. Both saints have figures on the jambs below and several windows in the interior lower level and clerestory..On the left is the Miracle of Martin's cloak. In the lower left panel, Martin, a young Roman stationed in Amiens, met a beggar at the city gate one cold day. Moved by the man's suffering, Martin cut his cloak in half and gave him one of the pieces. In the upper left panel, Martin is shown sleeping. His dream is shown on the tympanum; Christ appears wearing the piece of the cloak he gave to the beggar, who had really been Christ..On the right are miracles of Nicholas. In the bottom panel, Nicholas anonymously gives dowries to three indigent girls. On the upper right, pilgrims at Nicholas's tomb, which supposedly gave off a miraculous healing fluid. .Archivolts: .On the lower register of archivolts are miracles of Gilles, including the Mass of St. Gilles (right). The other archivolts show various Confessors.A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • South Porch, Right Portal, Tympanum- General View.This portal is dedicated to the Confessors. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Tympanum and Lintel: Miracles by two very popular saints, Martin and Nicholas, are shown on the tympanum and lintel. Both saints have figures on the jambs below and several windows in the interior lower level and clerestory..On the left is the Miracle of Martin's cloak. In the lower left panel, Martin, a young Roman stationed in Amiens, met a beggar at the city gate one cold day. Moved by the man's suffering, Martin cut his cloak in half and gave him one of the pieces. In the upper left panel, Martin is shown sleeping. His dream is shown on the tympanum; Christ appears wearing the piece of the cloak he gave to the beggar, who had really been Christ..On the right are miracles of Nicholas. In the bottom panel, Nicholas anonymously gives dowries to three indigent girls. On the upper right, pilgrims at Nicholas's tomb, which supposedly gave off a miraculous healing fluid. .Archivolts: .On the lower register of archivolts are miracles of Gilles, including the Mass of St. Gilles (right). The other archivolts show various Confessors.A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • South Porch, Right Portal, Tympanum- General View.This portal is dedicated to the Confessors. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Tympanum and Lintel: Miracles by two very popular saints, Martin and Nicholas, are shown on the tympanum and lintel. Both saints have figures on the jambs below and several windows in the interior lower level and clerestory..On the left is the Miracle of Martin's cloak. In the lower left panel, Martin, a young Roman stationed in Amiens, met a beggar at the city gate one cold day. Moved by the man's suffering, Martin cut his cloak in half and gave him one of the pieces. In the upper left panel, Martin is shown sleeping. His dream is shown on the tympanum; Christ appears wearing the piece of the cloak he gave to the beggar, who had really been Christ..On the right are miracles of Nicholas. In the bottom panel, Nicholas anonymously gives dowries to three indigent girls. On the upper right, pilgrims at Nicholas's tomb, which supposedly gave off a miraculous healing fluid. .Archivolts: .On the lower register of archivolts are miracles of Gilles, including the Mass of St. Gilles (right). The other archivolts show various Confessors.A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval Gothic Sculptures of the South portal  Tympanum and lintel depicting Christ and the Last Judgement. Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval Gothic Sculptures of the South portal  lintel depicting The Damned of  the Last Judgement. Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval Gothic Sculptures of the South portal  Tympanum and lintel depicting Christ and the Last Judgement. Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval Gothic Sculptures of the South portal  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. The portal shaows the Last Judgement and the small figures represent "The Damned". A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval Gothic Sculptures of the South portal  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. The portal shaows the Last Judgement and the small figures represent "The blessed". A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval Gothic Sculptures of the South portal  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. The portal shaows the Last Judgement and the small figures represent "The blessed". A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval Gothic Sculptures of the South portal  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. The portal shaows the Last Judgement and the small figures represent "The blessed". A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval Gothic Sculptures of the South portal  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. The portal shaows the Last Judgement and the small figures represent "The blessed". A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval Gothic Sculptures of the South portal  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. The portal shaows the Last Judgement and the small figures represent "The blessed". A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval Gothic Sculptures of the South portal  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • Medieval Gothic Sculptures of the South portal  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • Medieval Gothic Sculptures of the South portal  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • Medieval Gothic Sculptures of the South portal  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • Medieval Gothic Sculptures of the South portal  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. The portal shaows the Last Judgement and the small figures represent "The blessed". A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The astronomical clock (1528)  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • Medieval Gothic Sculptures of the South portal  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. The portal shaows the Last Judgement and the small figures represent "The blessed". A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • 16th century flamboyant gothic Choir screen and ambulatory of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • 16th century flamboyant gothic Choir screen and ambulatory of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • 16th century flamboyant gothic Choir screen and ambulatory of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • 16th century flamboyant gothic Choir screen and ambulatory of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • 16th century flamboyant gothic Choir screen and ambulatory of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • 16th century flamboyant gothic Choir screen and ambulatory of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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