• Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelius was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Gothic decorative relief panel depicting the Virgin Mary and Saint Antony. circa 1378-1390 from the church of Salvador of Gerb, Noguera. inv MNAC 25071, National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain
  • Gothic decorative relief panel depicting the Virgin Mary and Saint Antony. circa 1378-1390 from the church of Salvador of Gerb, Noguera. inv MNAC 25071, National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain
  • Gothic panel of the (Virgin Mary) Madonna of Humility. Polychrome and gold leaf on wood, circa 1433-1435. The Virgin is seated on a cushion on the floor holding the baby Jesus. She hand a jug with roses a symbol of motherhood and purity. Behind her a gold curtain is held by three angels, while two others are sitting on the floor are playing the organ and lute. The skill of the use of light and shade and the fine brushwork points to an artist of great skill using the Quattrocento style. The piece has been identified as that described by the writer on art Giorgia Vasari in 1568 which was owned Gondi family in Florence.. Inv MNAC 212817. National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain
  • Gothic chest decorated with the Slaughter of the Innocents from Limoges Circa 1210-1220. Engraved copper with inlaid enamel  enamel champlevé and glass on wooden core. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC 65529
  • Gothic cast bronze statue of Christ. Date circa 1180 probably comes from Cerdanya.  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain inv no: MNAC 4553
  • Gothic painted bas-relief of Life of St Peter by Joan Gasco. Polycchrome and gold leaf on wood. Date Circa 1516.  From the church of Santa Maria of Palautordera (Valles Oriental). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 015934-000
  • Gothic painted wood panels with scenes of the Martyrdom of Saint Lucy<br />
Circa 1300. Tempera on wood. Date Circa 1300. From the parish church of Santa Llúcia de Mur (Guàrdia de Noguera, Pallars Jussà). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 035703-CJT
  • Gothic painted Panel Virgin of the "Consellers" by Lluis Dalmau. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Date 1443-1445. Dimesions 316 x 312.5 x 32.5 cm. From the altar of the chapel of Barcelona City Hall. <br />
The prestige attached to Burgundian courtly culture and the painter Jan van Eyck explain why in 1431 King Alfons the Magnanimous sent his official painter, the Valencian Lluís Dalmau, to Flanders, to learn the new realist language at first hand. In 1443, Dalmau was commissioned to paint this altarpiece for the chapel of the City Hall. This work was a breakthrough in Catalonia on account of the format, the technique used, as it was painted in oil, and the skilful illusionism of a figurative space in which that year's five councillors, painted from life, are represented on the same scale as the Virgin and the Saints. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 015938-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Virgin of the "Consellers" by Lluis Dalmau. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Date 1443-1445. Dimesions 316 x 312.5 x 32.5 cm. From the altar of the chapel of Barcelona City Hall. <br />
The prestige attached to Burgundian courtly culture and the painter Jan van Eyck explain why in 1431 King Alfons the Magnanimous sent his official painter, the Valencian Lluís Dalmau, to Flanders, to learn the new realist language at first hand. In 1443, Dalmau was commissioned to paint this altarpiece for the chapel of the City Hall. This work was a breakthrough in Catalonia on account of the format, the technique used, as it was painted in oil, and the skilful illusionism of a figurative space in which that year's five councillors, painted from life, are represented on the same scale as the Virgin and the Saints. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 015938-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Altarpiece of Saint Barbara by Goncal Peris Sarria. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Date Circa 1410-1425. Dimesions 278 x 207.7 x 17 cm. At the beginning of the 20th century, the altarpiece was kept in the parish church of Puertomingalvo (Teruel), but it could originally have come from the chapel of Santa Bárbara near this town. This altarpiece is attributed to the painter Gonçal Peris Sarrià, one of the chief representatives of Valencian International Gothic. His style is marked by expressive and picturesque elements, the flowing line and the charm of the colour. The main compartment of the altarpiece represents the titular saint with her distinctive attributes –the tower, in allusion to her imprisonment, and the palm, as she is considered a martyr-- and above her the Calvary. On either side are depicted various episodes from the life of Saint Barbara, who was called on to keep away lightning and storms. . National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 035672-CJT
  • Gothic painted Panel Altarpiece of the Virgin Suckling the Child, Saint Clare and Saint Anthony the Abbott by the Workshop of Llorenc Saragossa. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Date Last quarter of 14th century. Dimesions 207 x 187.5 x 10 cm. From Xelva (Valencia). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 064027-CJT
  • Gothic painted Panel Altarpiece of the Virgin Suckling the Child, Saint Clare and Saint Anthony the Abbott by the Workshop of Llorenc Saragossa. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Date Last quarter of 14th century. Dimesions 207 x 187.5 x 10 cm. From Xelva (Valencia). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 064027-CJT
  • Gothic painted bas-relief of the Presentation of Jesus at the Templeby Master of Albesa, Active in Lleida. Polychrome and gilded limestone bas-relief. Second half of 14th century. Dimesions 57 x 69 x 11 cm. Compartment of a sculptural altarpiece devoted to the Virgin. From the crypt of the collegiate church of Sant Pere d'Àger (Noguera). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 017343-000
  • Gothic painted bas-relief of the Presentation of Jesus at the Templeby Master of Albesa, Active in Lleida. Polychrome and gilded limestone bas-relief. Second half of 14th century. Dimesions 57 x 69 x 11 cm. Compartment of a sculptural altarpiece devoted to the Virgin. From the crypt of the collegiate church of Sant Pere d'Àger (Noguera). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 017343-000
  • Gothic painted bas-relief of the Nativity by Master of Albesa, Active in Lleida. Polychrome and gilded limestone bas-relief. Second half of 14th century. Dimesions 57 x 69 x 11 cm.Compartment of a sculptural altarpiece devoted to the Virgin. From the crypt of the collegiate church of Sant Pere d'Àger (Noguera). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 017342-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Virgin Suckling the Child by Llorenc Saragossa. Tempera, gold leaf and metal plate on wood. Last quarter of 14th century. Dimensions 196.7 x 148.4 x 9.5 cm.  It comes from Albarracín cathedral (Teruel).  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 005080-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Virgin Suckling the Child by Llorenc Saragossa. Tempera, gold leaf and metal plate on wood. Last quarter of 14th century. Dimensions 196.7 x 148.4 x 9.5 cm.  It comes from Albarracín cathedral (Teruel).  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 005080-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Virgin Suckling the Child by Llorenc Saragossa. Tempera, gold leaf and metal plate on wood. Last quarter of 14th century. Dimensions 196.7 x 148.4 x 9.5 cm.  It comes from Albarracín cathedral (Teruel).  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 005080-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Virgin Suckling the Child by Llorenc Saragossa. Tempera, gold leaf and metal plate on wood. Last quarter of 14th century. Dimensions 196.7 x 148.4 x 9.5 cm.  It comes from Albarracín cathedral (Teruel).  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 005080-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Virgin of the Angels by  Enrique de Estencop. Tempera, stucco reliefs and gold leaf on wood. 1391-1392. Dimensions 142.2 x 99 x 8 cm.  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 064025-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Virgin of the Angels by  Enrique de Estencop. Tempera, stucco reliefs and gold leaf on wood. 1391-1392. Dimensions 142.2 x 99 x 8 cm.  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 064025-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Virgin of the Angels by  Enrique de Estencop. Tempera, stucco reliefs and gold leaf on wood. 1391-1392. Dimensions 142.2 x 99 x 8 cm.  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 064025-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Altarpiece of Saint Stephen by  Jaume Serra. Tempera, gold leaf and metal plate on wood. Circa 1385. Dimesions 185.7 x 186.5 x 11 cm. From the monastery of Santa Maria de Gualter (Noguera).. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 003947-CJT
  • Gothic painted Panel Altarpiece of Saint Anthony the Abbot by Master of Rubio. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Circa 1360-1375. Dimensions 173.5 x 176.3 x 11.5 cm.  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 045854-CJT
  • Gothic painted Panel Virgin of the Angels by Pere Serra. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Circa 1385. 195.8 x 131 x 11 cm. Comes from Tortosa cathedral (Baix Ebre). <br />
This splendid central panel and the two sections of the predella with saints (which must once have flanked a tabernacle) are all that remains of an altarpiece. It was dedicated to the Virgin Mary and was painted for one of the chapels in the ambulatory of Tortosa cathedral, probably towards the 1380s. The compartment with the Virgin and Child surrounded by angels playing music is a very graceful and refined version of an iconographic type that was extremely popular at the time. Pere Serra, author of the altarpiece, came from a family of painters who grew to head the Catalan painting of the second half of the fourteenth century. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 003950-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Virgin of the Angels by Pere Serra. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Circa 1385. 195.8 x 131 x 11 cm. Comes from Tortosa cathedral (Baix Ebre). <br />
This splendid central panel and the two sections of the predella with saints (which must once have flanked a tabernacle) are all that remains of an altarpiece. It was dedicated to the Virgin Mary and was painted for one of the chapels in the ambulatory of Tortosa cathedral, probably towards the 1380s. The compartment with the Virgin and Child surrounded by angels playing music is a very graceful and refined version of an iconographic type that was extremely popular at the time. Pere Serra, author of the altarpiece, came from a family of painters who grew to head the Catalan painting of the second half of the fourteenth century. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 003950-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Virgin of the Angels by Pere Serra. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Circa 1385. 195.8 x 131 x 11 cm. Comes from Tortosa cathedral (Baix Ebre). <br />
This splendid central panel and the two sections of the predella with saints (which must once have flanked a tabernacle) are all that remains of an altarpiece. It was dedicated to the Virgin Mary and was painted for one of the chapels in the ambulatory of Tortosa cathedral, probably towards the 1380s. The compartment with the Virgin and Child surrounded by angels playing music is a very graceful and refined version of an iconographic type that was extremely popular at the time. Pere Serra, author of the altarpiece, came from a family of painters who grew to head the Catalan painting of the second half of the fourteenth century. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 003950-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Altarpiece of Saint Vincent by  Master of Estopanya. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Circa 1350-1370. 199 x 255 x 10 cm. Comes from Estopanyà (Baixa Ribagorça, Huesca).. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 003940-CJT
  • Gothic statue of Saint Peter by Joan Gasco. Tempera, oil, and stucco reliefs in gold leaf on wood. Date circa 1516. From the church of Santa Maria of Palautordera (Valles Oriental).  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain inv no: 15934
  • Gothic painted Panel Altarpiece of the Annunciation  by the Circle of Ferrer and Arnau Bassa. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Circa 1347-1360. 282.9 x 151 x 11 cm. The origin of this panel has traditionally been associated with the collegiate church of Sant Vicenç de Cardona (Bages). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 015855-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Altarpiece of the Annunciation and Three Kings of the Epiphany by the Circle of Ferrer and Arnau Bassa. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Circa 1347-1360. 282.9 x 151 x 11 cm. The origin of this panel has traditionally been associated with the collegiate church of Sant Vicenç de Cardona (Bages). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 015855-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Altarpiece of the Annunciation and Three Kings of the Epiphany by the Circle of Ferrer and Arnau Bassa. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Circa 1347-1360. 282.9 x 151 x 11 cm. The origin of this panel has traditionally been associated with the collegiate church of Sant Vicenç de Cardona (Bages). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 015855-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Altarpiece of the Annunciation and Three Kings of the Epiphany by the Circle of Ferrer and Arnau Bassa. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Circa 1347-1360. 282.9 x 151 x 11 cm. The origin of this panel has traditionally been associated with the collegiate church of Sant Vicenç de Cardona (Bages). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 015855-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Altarpiece of the Saints John by  Master of Santa Coloma de Queralt. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Circa 1356. 220.5 x 209.8 x 11.5 cm. From the church of Sant Miquel de Tamarit de Llitera (Huesca). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 004351-CJT
  • Gothic painted Panel of the Announcement to the Shepherds and Annunciation by anonymous artist from Navarra. Tempera and varnished metal leaf on wood and applied carving. Circa 1335-1350. 90.8 x 171.2 x 5.8 cm. From the parish church of Arteta (Navarra).. National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 004368-000
  • Gothic painted Panel of the Announcement to the Shepherds and Annunciation by anonymous artist from Navarra. Tempera and varnished metal leaf on wood and applied carving. Circa 1335-1350. 90.8 x 171.2 x 5.8 cm. From the parish church of Arteta (Navarra).. National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 004368-000
  • Gothic statue of the Head of Christ by  Jaume Cascalls. Carved alabaster with polychrome and gilt remains.  This head must have belonged to a Recumbent Christ which could have formed part of a sculptural group of the Holy Sepulchre. It probably came from the chapel of Corpus Christi of the convent of Sant Agustí Vell, Barcelona.<br />
Jaume Cascalls is one of the most important sculptors of the fourteenth century in Catalonia. This is borne out by his involvement over almost thirty years with the project of the royal pantheon in Poblet for King Peter the Ceremonious and with other large undertakings of the time. Today, on stylistic grounds, he is credited with this 'Head of Christ', which must have formed part of a sculptural group of the Holy Sepulchre, presumably from the church of the convent of Sant Agustí Vell in Barcelona. The break in the neck suggests it belonged to a full-length recumbent Christ, like the one kept at Sant Feliu in Girona and also attributed to Cascalls. National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 034879-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Altar frontal of Jesus' childhood by anonymous artist from Navarra. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Second quarter of 14th century. 90.8 x 171.2 x 5.8 cm. From the parish church of Arteta (Navarra).. National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 004368-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Altar frontal of Jesus' childhood by anonymous artist from Navarra. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Second quarter of 14th century. 90.8 x 171.2 x 5.8 cm. From the parish church of Arteta (Navarra).. National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 004368-000
  • Gothic painted Altarpiece of Saint Peter Martyr by an anonymous Aragon artist. Tempera and varnished metal plate on wood. First third of 14th century. 196.5 x 121.5 x 10 cm. From Barbastre or the monastery of Santa María de Sigena (Villanueva de Sigena, Huesca).. National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 015820-000
  • Gothic painted Panel of the life of Saint Dominic, anonymous artist from Aragon. Tempera and varnished metal plate on wood. First quarter of 14th century. 134 x 193 x 8.3 cm. From the church of Sant Miquel de Tamarit de Llitera (Huesca). National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 015825-000
  • Gothic painted Panel of the life of Saint Dominic, anonymous artist from Aragon. Tempera and varnished metal plate on wood. First quarter of 14th century. 134 x 193 x 8.3 cm. From the church of Sant Miquel de Tamarit de Llitera (Huesca). National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 015825-000
  • Gothic painted Altar frontal of Saint Christopher by Master of Soriguerola. Tempera and varnished metal plate on wood. Beginning of 14th century. 134 x 193 x 8.3 cm. The traditional hypothesis is that it could have come from the parish church of Sant Cristòfol de Toses (Ripollès), as the titular saint coincides with the church's dedication.. National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 015825-000
  • Gothic wood statue of Bishop Saint by the St Bertrand de Cominges Group of artists. Polychrome wood carving with varnished metal-plating.  National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 064024-000
  • Gothic painted Panel of the life of Saint Ursula. Tempera and varnished metal plate on wood. National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 004377-000
  • Altarpiece of the Virgin by JAUME SERRA Circa 1367-1381. Tempera, gold leaf and metal plate on wood (346.3 x 321 x 26 cm) MNAC - National Museum of Catalan art, Barcelona, Spain Inv No: 015916-CJT
  • Gothic wood statue of a Saint by the St Bertrand de Cominges Group of artists. Polychrome wood carving with varnished metal-plating.  National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 064015-000
  • Gothic wood statue of Saint Lucy by the St Bertrand de Cominges Group of artists. Polychrome wood carving with varnished metal-plating.  National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 064013-000
  • Virgin Mary  Gothic sculpture from a Calvery scene. Polychrome wood carving with remains of varnished metal plate. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 004390-CJT.
  • Painted Gothic panels from the Altarpiece of the Virgin of the Angels.<br />
From Left - San John the Baptist, Santa Mary Magdele, St. James the Less, St. Paul.Tempera and gold leaf on wood, circa 1385 by by Pere Serra  from the Cathedral of Tortosa (Tarragona). Inv MNAC 3950, 3948, 3949. National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain
  • Gothic painted bas-relief of the Nativity by Master of Albesa, Active in Lleida. Polychrome and gilded limestone bas-relief. Second half of 14th century. Dimesions 57 x 69 x 11 cm.Compartment of a sculptural altarpiece devoted to the Virgin. From the crypt of the collegiate church of Sant Pere d'Àger (Noguera). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 017342-000
  • Gothic painted bas-relief of the Nativity by Master of Albesa, Active in Lleida. Polychrome and gilded limestone bas-relief. Second half of 14th century. Dimesions 57 x 69 x 11 cm.Compartment of a sculptural altarpiece devoted to the Virgin. From the crypt of the collegiate church of Sant Pere d'Àger (Noguera). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 017342-000
  • Gothic painted bas-relief of the Nativity by Master of Albesa, Active in Lleida. Polychrome and gilded limestone bas-relief. Second half of 14th century. Dimesions 57 x 69 x 11 cm.Compartment of a sculptural altarpiece devoted to the Virgin. From the crypt of the collegiate church of Sant Pere d'Àger (Noguera). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 017342-000
  • Gothic painted bas-relief of the Nativity by Master of Albesa, Active in Lleida. Polychrome and gilded limestone bas-relief. Second half of 14th century. Dimesions 57 x 69 x 11 cm.Compartment of a sculptural altarpiece devoted to the Virgin. From the crypt of the collegiate church of Sant Pere d'Àger (Noguera). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 017342-000
  • Gothic chest decorated with the Resurection of Christ from Limoges Circa 1220. Engraved copper with inlaid enamel  enamel champlevé and glass on wooden core. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: MNAC 65530
  • Gothic painted Panel Virgin of the "Consellers" by Lluis Dalmau. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Date 1443-1445. Dimesions 316 x 312.5 x 32.5 cm. From the altar of the chapel of Barcelona City Hall. <br />
The prestige attached to Burgundian courtly culture and the painter Jan van Eyck explain why in 1431 King Alfons the Magnanimous sent his official painter, the Valencian Lluís Dalmau, to Flanders, to learn the new realist language at first hand. In 1443, Dalmau was commissioned to paint this altarpiece for the chapel of the City Hall. This work was a breakthrough in Catalonia on account of the format, the technique used, as it was painted in oil, and the skilful illusionism of a figurative space in which that year's five councillors, painted from life, are represented on the same scale as the Virgin and the Saints. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 015938-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Virgin of the "Consellers" by Lluis Dalmau. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Date 1443-1445. Dimesions 316 x 312.5 x 32.5 cm. From the altar of the chapel of Barcelona City Hall. <br />
The prestige attached to Burgundian courtly culture and the painter Jan van Eyck explain why in 1431 King Alfons the Magnanimous sent his official painter, the Valencian Lluís Dalmau, to Flanders, to learn the new realist language at first hand. In 1443, Dalmau was commissioned to paint this altarpiece for the chapel of the City Hall. This work was a breakthrough in Catalonia on account of the format, the technique used, as it was painted in oil, and the skilful illusionism of a figurative space in which that year's five councillors, painted from life, are represented on the same scale as the Virgin and the Saints. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 015938-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Altarpiece of the Virgin Suckling the Child, Saint Clare and Saint Anthony the Abbott by the Workshop of Llorenc Saragossa. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Date Last quarter of 14th century. Dimesions 207 x 187.5 x 10 cm. From Xelva (Valencia). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 064027-CJT
  • Gothic painted bas-relief of the Presentation of Jesus at the Templeby Master of Albesa, Active in Lleida. Polychrome and gilded limestone bas-relief. Second half of 14th century. Dimesions 57 x 69 x 11 cm. Compartment of a sculptural altarpiece devoted to the Virgin. From the crypt of the collegiate church of Sant Pere d'Àger (Noguera). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 017343-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Altarpiece of the Virgin Suckling the Child, Saint Clare and Saint Anthony the Abbott by the Workshop of Llorenc Saragossa. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Date Last quarter of 14th century. Dimesions 207 x 187.5 x 10 cm. From Xelva (Valencia). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 064027-CJT
  • Gothic painted bas-relief of the Presentation of Jesus at the Templeby Master of Albesa, Active in Lleida. Polychrome and gilded limestone bas-relief. Second half of 14th century. Dimesions 57 x 69 x 11 cm. Compartment of a sculptural altarpiece devoted to the Virgin. From the crypt of the collegiate church of Sant Pere d'Àger (Noguera). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 017343-000
  • Gothic painted bas-relief of the Nativity by Master of Albesa, Active in Lleida. Polychrome and gilded limestone bas-relief. Second half of 14th century. Dimesions 57 x 69 x 11 cm.Compartment of a sculptural altarpiece devoted to the Virgin. From the crypt of the collegiate church of Sant Pere d'Àger (Noguera). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 017342-000
  • Gothic painted bas-relief of the Nativity by Master of Albesa, Active in Lleida. Polychrome and gilded limestone bas-relief. Second half of 14th century. Dimesions 57 x 69 x 11 cm.Compartment of a sculptural altarpiece devoted to the Virgin. From the crypt of the collegiate church of Sant Pere d'Àger (Noguera). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 017342-000
  • Gothic painted bas-relief of the Nativity by Master of Albesa, Active in Lleida. Polychrome and gilded limestone bas-relief. Second half of 14th century. Dimesions 57 x 69 x 11 cm.Compartment of a sculptural altarpiece devoted to the Virgin. From the crypt of the collegiate church of Sant Pere d'Àger (Noguera). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 017342-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Virgin Suckling the Child by Llorenc Saragossa. Tempera, gold leaf and metal plate on wood. Last quarter of 14th century. Dimensions 196.7 x 148.4 x 9.5 cm.  It comes from Albarracín cathedral (Teruel).  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 005080-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Virgin of the Angels by  Enrique de Estencop. Tempera, stucco reliefs and gold leaf on wood. 1391-1392. Dimensions 142.2 x 99 x 8 cm.  National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 064025-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Virgin of the Angels by Pere Serra. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Circa 1385. 195.8 x 131 x 11 cm. Comes from Tortosa cathedral (Baix Ebre). <br />
This splendid central panel and the two sections of the predella with saints (which must once have flanked a tabernacle) are all that remains of an altarpiece. It was dedicated to the Virgin Mary and was painted for one of the chapels in the ambulatory of Tortosa cathedral, probably towards the 1380s. The compartment with the Virgin and Child surrounded by angels playing music is a very graceful and refined version of an iconographic type that was extremely popular at the time. Pere Serra, author of the altarpiece, came from a family of painters who grew to head the Catalan painting of the second half of the fourteenth century. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 003950-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Altarpiece of the Annunciation  by the Circle of Ferrer and Arnau Bassa. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Circa 1347-1360. 282.9 x 151 x 11 cm. The origin of this panel has traditionally been associated with the collegiate church of Sant Vicenç de Cardona (Bages). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 015855-000
  • Gothic painted Panel Altarpiece of the Annunciation and Three Kings of the Epiphany by the Circle of Ferrer and Arnau Bassa. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Circa 1347-1360. 282.9 x 151 x 11 cm. The origin of this panel has traditionally been associated with the collegiate church of Sant Vicenç de Cardona (Bages). National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 015855-000
  • Altarpiece of the Virgin by JAUME SERRA Circa 1367-1381. Tempera, gold leaf and metal plate on wood (346.3 x 321 x 26 cm) MNAC - National Museum of Catalan art, Barcelona, Spain Inv No: 015916-CJT
  • Altarpiece of the Virgin by JAUME SERRA Circa 1367-1381. Tempera, gold leaf and metal plate on wood (346.3 x 321 x 26 cm) MNAC - National Museum of Catalan art, Barcelona, Spain Inv No: 015916-CJT
  • St John the Evangelist Gothic sculpture from a Calvery scene. Polychrome wood carving with remains of varnished metal plate. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 004390-CJT.
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic fresco depicting Pan and Hermaphrodite, Pompeii (VI, 9, 6,) Casa die Dioscuri, inv 27700, 1-50 AD, Naples Archaological Museum, Italy
  • 1 cent AD Roman Mythical Erotic  fresco from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum inv no: 110590
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  fresco depicting Mars and Venus  Pompeii (VI, 9, 2,) Casa die Meleagro, inv 9250, 1st century AD, Naples Archaological Museum , Italy
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  fresco depicting Mars and Venus  Pompeii (VI, 9, 2,) Casa die Meleagro, inv 9250, 1st century AD, Naples Archaological Museum , Italy
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  fresco depicting Mars and Venus  Pompeii (VI, 9, 2,) Casa die Meleagro, inv 9250, 1st century AD, Naples Archaological Museum , Italy
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic fresco depicting Pan and Hermaphrodite, Pompeii (VI, 9, 6,) Casa die Dioscuri, inv 27700, 1-50 AD, Naples Archaological Museum, Italy
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  fresco from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  fresco from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  fresco from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic Mosaic from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic Mosaic from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  fresco depicting Mars and Venus  Pompeii (VI, 9, 2,) Casa die Meleagro, inv 9250, 1st century AD, Naples Archaological Museum , Italy
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  fresco from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic Mosaic from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  Mythical fresco from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum inv no: 110590
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  fresco of a man & woman having sex  from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum inv no: 27696
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  fresco of a man & woman having sex  from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum inv no: 27696
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  fresco from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum inv no 27875
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  fresco from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  Mythical fresco  from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum  inv no: 27697
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  fresco of a man & woman having sex  from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum inv no: 27686
  • "Pan & Goat" Roman Mythical erotic sculpture from Pompeii. Naples Archaeological inv no: 27709
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  fresco from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  fresco from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum
  • Roman Erotic  fresco with pigmies from Csa Detto del Medico Peristyle in Pompeii. 50-97 AD, Naples Archaological Museum inv no: 113196
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  fresco from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum
  • 1 cent AD Roman Mythical Erotic  fresco from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum inv no: 110590
  • Workshop Banner showing Mercury with a massive phalus. Erotic Fresco from Pompeii, Naples Archaeological Museum 1st cent AD
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  fresco from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  Mythical fresco  from a house in Pompeii. Naples Archaological Museum  inv no: 27697
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic fresco depicting Pan and Hermaphrodite, Pompeii (VI, 9, 6,) Casa die Dioscuri, inv 27700, 1-50 AD, Naples Archaological Museum, Italy
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic fresco depicting Pan and Hermaphrodite, Pompeii (VI, 9, 6,) Casa die Dioscuri, inv 27700, 1-50 AD, Naples Archaological Museum, Italy
  • Roman fresco wall decorations from Villas of Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations from Villas of Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Bedroom B, the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
The bedroom (cubiculum). an intimate space with a bed (kline), divided into antechamber and bed alcove, has a rich decoration whose dominant color is the expensive cinnabar red. Architectural elements rendered in perspective complete with shadows are the setting for representations of pictures hung on the walls, which give the impression of an art gallery. Painted aedicula frame on the left wall the toilette of Aphrodite, on the right Dionysos with the nymphs of Mt. Nysa, to whom Zeus had entrusted the care of his baby son. Other small pictures, shown with illusionistic wooden protective shutters, present scenes of interiors and pairs of lovers. Fantastic ornamental figures and Egyptian gods, like Isis and Juppiter Ammon, cover the walls. The barrel vault in pure white stucco is decorated with reliefs showing scenes of initiation into the mysteries and idylic landscapes with sacred elements.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Bedroom B, the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
The bedroom (cubiculum). an intimate space with a bed (kline), divided into antechamber and bed alcove, has a rich decoration whose dominant color is the expensive cinnabar red. Architectural elements rendered in perspective complete with shadows are the setting for representations of pictures hung on the walls, which give the impression of an art gallery. Painted aedicula frame on the left wall the toilette of Aphrodite, on the right Dionysos with the nymphs of Mt. Nysa, to whom Zeus had entrusted the care of his baby son. Other small pictures, shown with illusionistic wooden protective shutters, present scenes of interiors and pairs of lovers. Fantastic ornamental figures and Egyptian gods, like Isis and Juppiter Ammon, cover the walls. The barrel vault in pure white stucco is decorated with reliefs showing scenes of initiation into the mysteries and idylic landscapes with sacred elements.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Bedroom B  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
The bedroom (cubiculum). an intimate space with a bed (kline), divided into antechamber and bed alcove, has a rich decoration whose dominant color is the expensive cinnabar red. Architectural elements rendered in perspective complete with shadows are the setting for representations of pictures hung on the walls, which give the impression of an art gallery. Painted aedicula frame on the left wall the toilette of Aphrodite, on the right Dionysos with the nymphs of Mt. Nysa, to whom Zeus had entrusted the care of his baby son. Other small pictures, shown with illusionistic wooden protective shutters, present scenes of interiors and pairs of lovers. Fantastic ornamental figures and Egyptian gods, like Isis and Juppiter Ammon, cover the walls. The barrel vault in pure white stucco is decorated with reliefs showing scenes of initiation into the mysteries and idylic landscapes with sacred elements.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Bedroom B  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
The bedroom (cubiculum). an intimate space with a bed (kline), divided into antechamber and bed alcove, has a rich decoration whose dominant color is the expensive cinnabar red. Architectural elements rendered in perspective complete with shadows are the setting for representations of pictures hung on the walls, which give the impression of an art gallery. Painted aedicula frame on the left wall the toilette of Aphrodite, on the right Dionysos with the nymphs of Mt. Nysa, to whom Zeus had entrusted the care of his baby son. Other small pictures, shown with illusionistic wooden protective shutters, present scenes of interiors and pairs of lovers. Fantastic ornamental figures and Egyptian gods, like Isis and Juppiter Ammon, cover the walls. The barrel vault in pure white stucco is decorated with reliefs showing scenes of initiation into the mysteries and idylic landscapes with sacred elements.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Corridor F-G  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The corridor was a covered passageway that connected the two wings of the villa, partly straight and partly curved, following the shape of the central esedra. The elements that remain are from the inner walkway. The wall is divided by slender columns. Their capitals support female figures whose architectural function is in turn to support the columns of the superstructure. The female figures hold floral garlands that link them to one another. They may be meant to represent Caryatids, the women of Caria sold into slavery, who gave the name to female figures used as supports instead of columns. The most important part of the decoration is the small pictures in the upper zone: still lifes with masks from the theater alternate with imaginary landscapes, shrines, statues of divinities, little aedicula, and altars, the whole populated by figures of peasants, fishermen, and shepherds. The scene depicting a naval battle on the curved part may well refer to the battle of Actium that led to Rome's conquest of Egypt.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Balnea Baths, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Room E9, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano, 130-140AD( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.
  • Roman Frescoes of the The Large Columbarium in Villa Doria Panphilj, Rome. A columbarium is usually a type of tomb with walls lined by niches that hold urns containing the ashes of the dead.  Large columbaria were built in Rome between the end of the Republican Era and the Flavio Principality (second half of the first century AD).  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.
  • Roman Frescoes of the The Large Columbarium in Villa Doria Panphilj, Rome. A columbarium is usually a type of tomb with walls lined by niches that hold urns containing the ashes of the dead.  Large columbaria were built in Rome between the end of the Republican Era and the Flavio Principality (second half of the first century AD).  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Viridarium L  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Rooms B and D, clearly bedrooms (cubicula), were symmetrically arranged and projected farther forward than the large room C (the triclinium). They opened onto a rectangular unroofed space that must have been a garden (viridarium). This was a genuine hortus conclusus (enclosed garden). The walls that surrounded the real garden were decorated with a painted garden, like an extension of the real one. The south wall was decorated with the three panels shown here: within dense vegetation there are huts made of reeds, jetting fountains, and a marble seat. The most complete example of this kind of room is the one from the Villa of Livia (on display on this floor of the museum), the prototype for the fashion that spread throughout the Roman world of painting gardens on interior walls and around real garden spaces.
  • Roman Fresco with a fight scene between octopus, lobster and eel, 125-150 AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 463Z4.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Excavated from the Porto di San Paolo near the Via Portuense, these frescoes decorated the thermal area of a suburban Roman Villa. The reconstructed fresco fragments, depict a group of three fighting animals: an octopus (octopus vulgaris) clutches a moray eel (muraena helena) and a lobster (palinurus vulgaris) in its tentacles; around them mud mullets (mullus barbatus) and rock mullets (mullus surmuletus) try to escape. Incriptions on the frescoes suggesy that the villa owner was from Alexandria where this style of nautical mosaic and fresco  decorations is found.
  • Roman fresco wall decoration frangmet from a Villa alongside the Tiber, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations from Villas of Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Bedroom B, the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
The bedroom (cubiculum). an intimate space with a bed (kline), divided into antechamber and bed alcove, has a rich decoration whose dominant color is the expensive cinnabar red. Architectural elements rendered in perspective complete with shadows are the setting for representations of pictures hung on the walls, which give the impression of an art gallery. Painted aedicula frame on the left wall the toilette of Aphrodite, on the right Dionysos with the nymphs of Mt. Nysa, to whom Zeus had entrusted the care of his baby son. Other small pictures, shown with illusionistic wooden protective shutters, present scenes of interiors and pairs of lovers. Fantastic ornamental figures and Egyptian gods, like Isis and Juppiter Ammon, cover the walls. The barrel vault in pure white stucco is decorated with reliefs showing scenes of initiation into the mysteries and idylic landscapes with sacred elements.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Bedroom B  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
The bedroom (cubiculum). an intimate space with a bed (kline), divided into antechamber and bed alcove, has a rich decoration whose dominant color is the expensive cinnabar red. Architectural elements rendered in perspective complete with shadows are the setting for representations of pictures hung on the walls, which give the impression of an art gallery. Painted aedicula frame on the left wall the toilette of Aphrodite, on the right Dionysos with the nymphs of Mt. Nysa, to whom Zeus had entrusted the care of his baby son. Other small pictures, shown with illusionistic wooden protective shutters, present scenes of interiors and pairs of lovers. Fantastic ornamental figures and Egyptian gods, like Isis and Juppiter Ammon, cover the walls. The barrel vault in pure white stucco is decorated with reliefs showing scenes of initiation into the mysteries and idylic landscapes with sacred elements.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Bedroom B  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
The bedroom (cubiculum). an intimate space with a bed (kline), divided into antechamber and bed alcove, has a rich decoration whose dominant color is the expensive cinnabar red. Architectural elements rendered in perspective complete with shadows are the setting for representations of pictures hung on the walls, which give the impression of an art gallery. Painted aedicula frame on the left wall the toilette of Aphrodite, on the right Dionysos with the nymphs of Mt. Nysa, to whom Zeus had entrusted the care of his baby son. Other small pictures, shown with illusionistic wooden protective shutters, present scenes of interiors and pairs of lovers. Fantastic ornamental figures and Egyptian gods, like Isis and Juppiter Ammon, cover the walls. The barrel vault in pure white stucco is decorated with reliefs showing scenes of initiation into the mysteries and idylic landscapes with sacred elements.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Bedroom B  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
The bedroom (cubiculum). an intimate space with a bed (kline), divided into antechamber and bed alcove, has a rich decoration whose dominant color is the expensive cinnabar red. Architectural elements rendered in perspective complete with shadows are the setting for representations of pictures hung on the walls, which give the impression of an art gallery. Painted aedicula frame on the left wall the toilette of Aphrodite, on the right Dionysos with the nymphs of Mt. Nysa, to whom Zeus had entrusted the care of his baby son. Other small pictures, shown with illusionistic wooden protective shutters, present scenes of interiors and pairs of lovers. Fantastic ornamental figures and Egyptian gods, like Isis and Juppiter Ammon, cover the walls. The barrel vault in pure white stucco is decorated with reliefs showing scenes of initiation into the mysteries and idylic landscapes with sacred elements.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Room E10 0f La Domus, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano, 130-140AD ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
 The white-ground central panel had a figured decoration, already obliterated by repairs carried out in antiquity. In the squares to the sides of the upper area, swathes of white fabric bordered by green leaves and berries are depicted against a purplish red background. The side walls are decorated in a similar symmetrical way; in the squares there are various decorative elements, a stag in flight with a quiver nearby (perhaps an allusion to the myth of Actaeon who was transformed into a stag by Artemis, or, more simply, to hunting), a small head (gorgoneion) contained between volutes.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Room E10 0f La Domus, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano, 130-140AD ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
 The white-ground central panel had a figured decoration, already obliterated by repairs carried out in antiquity. In the squares to the sides of the upper area, swathes of white fabric bordered by green leaves and berries are depicted against a purplish red background. The side walls are decorated in a similar symmetrical way; in the squares there are various decorative elements, a stag in flight with a quiver nearby (perhaps an allusion to the myth of Actaeon who was transformed into a stag by Artemis, or, more simply, to hunting), a small head (gorgoneion) contained between volutes.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Vestibule of a Rome Villa, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
A large fresco covered the curving wall of the vestibule E 5 was positioned at the entrance of the house onto the street. Vitruvius claims that the vestibulum was a room which was not needed by common people, but which was essential in a house worthy of respect, because it served to welcome guests and the people who came to be received by the owners of the house. The frescoed decoration of this wall, which was entirely detached, shows a division into panels, architectural perspectives and pavilions among which are figures and decorative elements, above a band of skirting. Numerous panels have been detached from the corridor E 3 E 11 which connected all the areas of the house, but it has not been possible to reconstruct the sequence of the walls. Inside the frames, against a white background, different decorative elements are arranged, along with hanging female and male figures, hippogriffs and other fantastical animals, vases, garlands and vegetation.
  • Fresco of Venus sitting restored as Roma  known as the “Dea Barberini” (“Barberini goddess”), dating from the first quarter of the fourth century. A.D, excavated near to Baptistery of St. John Lateran , Rome Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.
  • Roman Frescoes of the The Large Columbarium in Villa Doria Panphilj, Rome. A columbarium is usually a type of tomb with walls lined by niches that hold urns containing the ashes of the dead.  Large columbaria were built in Rome between the end of the Republican Era and the Flavio Principality (second half of the first century AD).  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Viridarium L  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.<br />
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Rooms B and D, clearly bedrooms (cubicula), were symmetrically arranged and projected farther forward than the large room C (the triclinium). They opened onto a rectangular unroofed space that must have been a garden (viridarium). This was a genuine hortus conclusus (enclosed garden). The walls that surrounded the real garden were decorated with a painted garden, like an extension of the real one. The south wall was decorated with the three panels shown here: within dense vegetation there are huts made of reeds, jetting fountains, and a marble seat. The most complete example of this kind of room is the one from the Villa of Livia (on display on this floor of the museum), the prototype for the fashion that spread throughout the Roman world of painting gardens on interior walls and around real garden spaces.
  • Roman Fresco with a fight scene between octopus, lobster and eel, 125-150 AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 463Z4.  Against an art background.<br />
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Excavated from the Porto di San Paolo near the Via Portuense, these frescoes decorated the thermal area of a suburban Roman Villa. The reconstructed fresco fragments, depict a group of three fighting animals: an octopus (octopus vulgaris) clutches a moray eel (muraena helena) and a lobster (palinurus vulgaris) in its tentacles; around them mud mullets (mullus barbatus) and rock mullets (mullus surmuletus) try to escape. Incriptions on the frescoes suggesy that the villa owner was from Alexandria where this style of nautical mosaic and fresco  decorations is found.
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   Against an art background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against an art background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against an art background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Painted Gothic gilded wooden statue altarpiece of Saint Catherine, circa 1520-1525 by Niklaus Weckmann from Ulm, Germany. The young Christian martyr is represented with his usual attributes, crown, book, wheel, sword, which make reference to her legendary life and her martyrdom. The bas-relief of Saint Catherine was originally part of an altarpiece. The treatment  and refined painted facial highlights executed the prettiness of the saint. The style is typical of  Niklaus Weckmann, one great masters of late Gothic Swabian art . Inv RF 2207.6,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Wooden Gothic sculpture of the Virgin and Child attributeed to Martin Hoffman from the city of Basle, 1507, Switzerland. From the Commandry of Isenheim, Haut Rhin. This sculpture is probably the "big and ancient wooden statue of the Virgin” cited in 1793 in the inventory of the property of the Commandry of Isenheim.  The vervatious deep folds in the Virgins dress, the laughing child Jesus  and the style of Mary were repeatedly imitated in Basel at the beginning of the sixteenth century. This masterpiece of the German late Gothic sculpture was executed in a Basel workshop and can be attributed to Martin Hoffman. Expressive and enigmatic, the style of this masterpiece is the heir of the sculpture schools of Stragbourg and Veit Stoss Franconian art.  Inv RF 1833 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted Gothic gilded wooden statue altarpiece of Saint Catherine, circa 1520-1525 by Niklaus Weckmann from Ulm, Germany. The young Christian martyr is represented with his usual attributes, crown, book, wheel, sword, which make reference to her legendary life and her martyrdom. The bas-relief of Saint Catherine was originally part of an altarpiece. The treatment  and refined painted facial highlights executed the prettiness of the saint. The style is typical of  Niklaus Weckmann, one great masters of late Gothic Swabian art . Inv RF 2207.6,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Vitellius, excavated  from Althiburos sculpted circa 20 April 69-20 Dec 69AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.1784. Against a grey art background.
  • Detail of a second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939. Against a grey art background.
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Gigantic Roman bronze statue hand from Rome. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman gilded bronze head of Emperor Constantine dating from about 330-337 AD.. Inv 5.13, The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman mask from the  National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Discus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite- type known as the Venus of Arles. A Roman statue in marble of the 1st - 2nd century AD in marble from Rome. The statue is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) and is  probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae a lost bronze sculpture by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . From the Royal collection Inv MR 366 ( or Ma 437), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Septime Severe, excavated  from Choud El Battan sculpted circa 193-211AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.73. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated  from Carthage made circa 161-180 AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.965. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Vespesien, excavated  from Althiburos sculpted circa  69-79AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.1025. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated from Bulla Regia Theatre, sculpted circa late second century. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Lucius Verus, excavated from Bulla Regia Theatre, sculpted circa 161-169 AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Gordian 1st, excavated from Carthage ( ruled 3 months in 238AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 3212. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Caracalla, excavated from Thuburbo-Majus, sculpted circa 211-217AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 1347. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Augustus, excavated from El-Jem, sculpted circa 27BC-14AD The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 72. Against a grey art background.
  • Second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939. Against a grey art background.
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy

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