• Babylonian stone relief sculpture. announcing a land deed of Adad-apla-iddina, 4th Dynasty king of Babylon from 1067 BC to 1046 BC . Copied from an original in the Pushkin Museum, Moscow. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, from the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, from the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Relief sculpture panels depicting men bearing gifts in the New Year festival, . From the reign of Darius 1st or Xerxes (485-465 BC) of the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire excavated from the Palace of Darius 1st Persepolis, present day Iran. Persepolis was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The panels depict the festival of New Year (Noruz) in which representatives of all the peoples of the realm participated. This panel comes from the stairways of the palace and show men bearing gifts. The clothing of this man with a lamb identifies him as a Mede. Persepolis was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The panels depict the festival of New Year (Noruz) in which representatives of all the peoples of the realm participated. This panel comes from the stairways of the palace and show men bearing gifts. The clothing of this man with a lamb identifies him as a Mede.. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture reporting the spoils of war, 12th cent.BC. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Babylonian Hammurabi stone relief sculpture. Hammurabi was the sixth Amorite king of Babylon from 1792 BC to 1750 BC . Hammurabi (standing), depicted as receiving his royal insignia from Shamash. Hammurabi holds his hands over his mouth as a sign of prayer. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture usurped by an Elamite king. 12th cent. BC from Suse. Inv AO 30043, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Bronze statuette of a Lion from the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire 6th to 5th cent. BC excavated from the Acropolis Susa, present day Iran.. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Bronze statuette of a Lion from the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire 6th to 5th cent. BC excavated from the Acropolis Susa, present day Iran.. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Babylonian Hammurabi stone relief sculpture. Hammurabi was the sixth Amorite king of Babylon from 1792 BC to 1750 BC . Hammurabi (standing), depicted as receiving his royal insignia from Shamash. Hammurabi holds his hands over his mouth as a sign of prayer. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture usurped by an Elamite king. 12th cent. BC from Suse. Inv AO 30043, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, from the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Babylonian stone relief sculpture. announcing a land deed of Adad-apla-iddina, 4th Dynasty king of Babylon from 1067 BC to 1046 BC . Copied from an original in the Pushkin Museum, Moscow. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture usurped by an Elamite king. 12th cent. BC from Suse. Inv AO 30043, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture reporting the spoils of war, 12th cent.BC. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture reporting the spoils of war, 12th cent.BC. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Relief sculpture panels depicting men bearing gifts in the New Year festival, . From the reign of Darius 1st or Xerxes (485-465 BC) of the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire excavated from the Palace of Darius 1st Persepolis, present day Iran. Persepolis was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The panels depict the festival of New Year (Noruz) in which representatives of all the peoples of the realm participated. This panel comes from the stairways of the palace and show men bearing gifts. The clothing of this man with a lamb identifies him as a Mede. Persepolis was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The panels depict the festival of New Year (Noruz) in which representatives of all the peoples of the realm participated. This panel comes from the stairways of the palace and show men bearing gifts. The clothing of this man identifies him as a Persian. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Bronze statuette of a Lion from the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire 6th to 5th cent. BC excavated from the Acropolis Susa, present day Iran.. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, from the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Bronze statuette of a Lion from the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire 6th to 5th cent. BC excavated from the Acropolis Susa, present day Iran.. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Babylonian stone relief sculpture. announcing a land deed of Adad-apla-iddina, 4th Dynasty king of Babylon from 1067 BC to 1046 BC . Copied from an original in the Pushkin Museum, Moscow. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels from the staircase walls excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC. Inv AOD 490-491, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture reporting the spoils of war, 12th cent.BC. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Babylonian Hammurabi stone relief sculpture. Hammurabi was the sixth Amorite king of Babylon from 1792 BC to 1750 BC . Hammurabi (standing), depicted as receiving his royal insignia from Shamash. Hammurabi holds his hands over his mouth as a sign of prayer. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture reporting the spoils of war, 12th cent.BC. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture usurped by an Elamite king. 12th cent. BC from Suse. Inv AO 30043, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Babylonian Hammurabi stone relief sculpture. Hammurabi was the sixth Amorite king of Babylon from 1792 BC to 1750 BC . Hammurabi (standing), depicted as receiving his royal insignia from Shamash. Hammurabi holds his hands over his mouth as a sign of prayer. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels from the staircase walls excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC. Inv AOD 490-491, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels from the staircase walls excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC. Inv AOD 490-491, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st. Susa was one of the residential cities of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes.  The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Babylonian stone relief sculpture. announcing a land deed of Adad-apla-iddina, 4th Dynasty king of Babylon from 1067 BC to 1046 BC . Copied from an original in the Pushkin Museum, Moscow. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Bronze statuette of a Lion from the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire 6th to 5th cent. BC excavated from the Acropolis Susa, present day Iran.. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Babylonian stone relief sculpture. announcing a land deed of Adad-apla-iddina, 4th Dynasty king of Babylon from 1067 BC to 1046 BC . Copied from an original in the Pushkin Museum, Moscow. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Babylonian Hammurabi stone relief sculpture. Hammurabi was the sixth Amorite king of Babylon from 1792 BC to 1750 BC . Hammurabi (standing), depicted as receiving his royal insignia from Shamash. Hammurabi holds his hands over his mouth as a sign of prayer. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta tiled panels depicting mythical Griffins. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran.. Inv AS 332607, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels of the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The gate was decorated with reprentations of bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, and dragons (Babylonian Mushhushu), the symbol of the city God Marduk. The mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting bulls, the symbol of the weather god Adad, from the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting the mythical composite animal has the head and the body of a snake, the front legs of a lion, the hind legs of a bird and a scorpion sting in the tail the symbol of the city God Marduk. From the facade of the  first smaller Ishtar Gate, Babylon, dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The Ishtar Gate, Babylon, was situated in the northern wall of the city and was named after the goddess Ishtar. The ground plan and debris of the gate buildings were uncovered during the German excavation from 1899-1917 directed by Robert Koldewey. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Basalt Babylonian sculpture usurped by an Elamite king. 12th cent. BC from Suse. Inv AO 30043, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panels depicting Achaemenid Persian royal bodyguards or archers. From the reign of Darius 1st and the First Persian or Achaemenid Empire around 510 BC excavated from the Palace of Daius 1st Susa, present day Iran. Susa was one of the residential cityes of the Achaemenid Kings. The Palaces are noteworthy for their elaborate decorations which can be considered exemplary of art at a royal court. The walls of Darius’s palace at Susa were embellished with colourful reliefs made from glazed bricks on the Babylonian model. It is not certain which rooms of the palace was decorated with representations of a procession of royal bodyguards or archers, dressed in richly decorative costumes. Inv Ab3312-21, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Stele depicting  a ceremonial procession of Babylonian Gods. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. Under the coils of the snake that wraps around the stele are represented the principal divinities of pantheon of Babylon as symbols. Below is a procession of two musicians and animals. Crenellated walls and towers surround the area reserve for an inscription that was never engraved. A horned serpent, emblem of the god Marduk, wraps around the base. Inv Sb 25. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Gypsum, schist, shells and lapis lazuli statue of Ebih-Il, early Dynastic; Shakkanakku (military governor) of the ancient city-state of Mari in present day eastern Syria, dating from circa 2340 BC or from the Akkadian period of rule Circa 2250 BC.. The statue carries a cuneiform inscription in Akkadian. Excavated from; the temple of Ishtar at Mari by André Parrot in 1934-1935 the statue measures; 52.5 cm (20.7 in) high; 20.6 cm (8.1 in) wide and 30 cm (11.8 in) deep. Department of Oriental Antiquities; Richelieu; ground floor; room 1b; inv AO 17551; Louvre Museum; Paris
  • Stained glass windows depicting scenes from the life of Saint Blaise, made in the first quarter of the 13th century from  Soissons, France .  Inv OAR 504,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted marble bust of Ferdinand of Aragon, King of Naples (1423-1494) from the “Porta Salvatore” Sulmona, Italy. Variously  attributed to Pietro do Milano (around 1435-1473) Francesco Laurana (circa 1430-1502) and Domenico Gagini (quote from 1448-492).  Inv RF 745, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Enamelled terracotta relief panel of Saint George sleighing the Dragon. Made in Florence around 11520. Inv RF 3096, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled box with scenes of the Massacre of the Innocents, last quarter of the 12th century from Limoges, enamel on gold. Monflanquin, Lot-en-Gironne. AD. Inv OA 10406, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled box depicting angels, circa12th century from Limoges, enamel on gold. AD.  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled box depicting angels, circa12th century from Limoges, enamel on gold. AD.  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled box depicting the entombment of a Saint, beginning of the 13th century from Limoges, enamel on gold. AD. Inv OA 949, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted plaster statue of Saint Mary Magdalene, circa 1515-1520, suspended from the vault of the church of St. Mary Magdalene Dominican convent of Augsburg. Inspired by an engraving of Albrecht Durer which depicted Mary Magdalene nude. Inv RF 1338,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted wooden relief sculptured altarpiece of two Popes, a  Cardinal, a Bishop a cannon and 7 priests praying made in 1505 by Daniel Mauch from Ulm. Inv RF 2805,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Enamelled terracotta relief panel of the Ascension of Christ made around 1490 for the Cordoni chapel in the church of Saint Agostino in the Citta de Castello, Umbria, Italy by Andrea  della Robbia of Florence.  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Enamelled terracotta relief panel of the Virgin and Child with two cherubs a copy of the “Madonna de l’Impuuneta” by Luca della Robbia, Florence 1399-1482).  Inv Campana 32,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted stucco bust of a female possibly the Virgin of the Annonciation or Saint Catherine of Sienna. made in Florence around 1429- 1484 from Papiano, Palagio Fiorentino.  Inv  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Enamelled plaque of Louis 12th known as the Sorrowful Virgin made in Limoge around 1500. inv 11170, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic ivory diptych with scenes from the Passion made in Paris in the second quarter of the 14th century.  inv 10006, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval ivory figure of Christ at the pillar made in Paris around 1300-1320.  inv 12380, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic ivory tabernacle depicting the Virgin and Child with scenes from the Annunciation, Nativity, the adoration of the Magi and the presentation at the Temple  made in Paris in second quarter of the 14th century and is a typical example of tabernacles made in Paris at that period.  inv 2587, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic ivory statuette of the Virgin and Child with traces of polychrome, third quarter of 13th century before 1279 made in Paris. From the treasury of the Saint Chapelle, Paris. inv 67, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled crosier with a lion and serpent, circa 12th century from Limoges, enamel on gold.  AD. Inv OA 7287, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled crucifix, end of the 12th century from Limoges, enamel on gold. AD. Inv OA 7284, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Bouquetin goats horn ivory crosier with traces of paint, circa 12th century from the south of Italy. Inv OA 11150, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval gilded manuscript cover depicting the Crucifixion. 11th century from the treasury of the Cathedral of Maastricht. AD.  <br />
This gilded with relief panel with inlaid stones was originally a manuscript cover. Since 1677, it contained the 'documents of the oath of the Dukes of Brabant'. The back of the panel is covered with precious fabrics. On the front, in the central part, is depicted a crucifixion the style of which is reminiscent of the works of the goldsmiths of the Emperor Henry II. On the borders are small icons and emblems including those of the Carolingians. The main interest of this work lies in the four enamelled on gold symbols of the evangelists in the four corners, two being 'Enforced’ on a background of gold, the others being painted.<br />
<br />
One of Latin inscriptions states that 'Beatrice  ordered the execution ( of this work) in honour of Almighty God and his saints“. It could be Beatrice wife of Hermann II of Swabia and daughter Emperor's sister-Conrad II or, more likely, Beatrice of Tuscany who in 1036 was wife of Boniface III, Marquis of Tuscany, and second wife of Geoffrey the Bearded, Duke of Lower Lorraine and Brabant.<br />
 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval ivory relief panel depicting the arrest of Christ.  From the workshop of Charles-le-Chauve circa 870 AD.. Inv. OA 9526, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Christian relief Icon depicting scenes from the Nativity, A central ivory panel surrounded by beaten silver border. From Constantinople, 11th or 12th century. Inv. OA 11399, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Enamelled terracotta panel depicting Saint Anne, the Virgin Mary and Child with Saint Anthony made in the 2nd half of the 16th century by Santi Bugloni of Florence. This is a typical Tuscan theme of the period. Saint Anne was particularly venerated during the expulsion of the tyrant Gaultier de Brienne, Duke of Athens. .  Inv Camp 38,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted plaster statue of Saint Mary Magdalene, circa 1515-1520, suspended from the vault of the church of St. Mary Magdalene Dominican convent of Augsburg. Inspired by an engraving of Albrecht Durer which depicted Mary Magdalene nude. Inv RF 1338,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted plaster statue of Saint Mary Magdalene, circa 1515-1520, suspended from the vault of the church of St. Mary Magdalene Dominican convent of Augsburg. Inspired by an engraving of Albrecht Durer which depicted Mary Magdalene nude. Inv RF 1338,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted plaster statue of Saint Mary Magdalene, circa 1515-1520, suspended from the vault of the church of St. Mary Magdalene Dominican convent of Augsburg. Inspired by an engraving of Albrecht Durer which depicted Mary Magdalene nude. Inv RF 1338,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval elephant ivory plaque with traces of paint made in Italy in the 13th or start of the 14th century.  The crucifixion is a rare example of a Gothic piece being inspired by 11th century Romanesque works.  inv 7268, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled box depicting the martyrdom of Saint Thomas Becket, 12th century from Limoges, enamel on gold. AD. Inv OA 11333, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled tabernacle depicting Christ in majesty, circa 1200 AD from Limoges, enamel on gold. AD. Inv OA 8984, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval relief panel depicting Christ, Enamel on gold from Limoges, circa 1220-1230. Inv OA 11935, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval gilded manuscript cover depicting the Crucifixion. 11th century from the treasury of the Cathedral of Maastricht. AD.  <br />
This gilded with relief panel with inlaid stones was originally a manuscript cover. Since 1677, it contained the 'documents of the oath of the Dukes of Brabant'. The back of the panel is covered with precious fabrics. On the front, in the central part, is depicted a crucifixion the style of which is reminiscent of the works of the goldsmiths of the Emperor Henry II. On the borders are small icons and emblems including those of the Carolingians. The main interest of this work lies in the four enamelled on gold symbols of the evangelists in the four corners, two being 'Enforced’ on a background of gold, the others being painted.<br />
<br />
One of Latin inscriptions states that 'Beatrice  ordered the execution ( of this work) in honour of Almighty God and his saints“. It could be Beatrice wife of Hermann II of Swabia and daughter Emperor's sister-Conrad II or, more likely, Beatrice of Tuscany who in 1036 was wife of Boniface III, Marquis of Tuscany, and second wife of Geoffrey the Bearded, Duke of Lower Lorraine and Brabant.<br />
 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval elephant ivory relief panel depicting the Crucifixtion. From southern Germany or north of Italy, end of 10th or 11th cent. AD. Inv. OA 12231, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval ivory relief panel from a diptych depicting a triumphant Byzantine Roman Emperor, probably Justinian. From Constantinople, 6th century. Inv. OA 9063, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Christian relief Icon depicting scenes from the Nativity, A central ivory panel surrounded by beaten silver border. From Constantinople, 11th or 12th century. Inv. OA 11399, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Christian relief Icon depicting scenes from the Nativity, A central ivory panel surrounded by beaten silver border. From Constantinople, 11th or 12th century. Inv. OA 11399, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Diorite statue of Guidea who ruled Lagash from around 2150 BC. The statue called the "gushing vase" dedicated to the goddess Geshtinanna. From the ancient Sumarian city of Lagash.
  • Black diorite statue of Guidea who ruled Lagash from around 2150 BC. The statue called the is dedicated to the god Ningishzida. From the ancient Sumarian city of Lagash. Louvre Museum Paris
  • Enamelled terracotta panel depicting Saint Anne, the Virgin Mary and Child with Saint Anthony made in the 2nd half of the 16th century by Santi Bugloni of Florence. This is a typical Tuscan theme of the period. Saint Anne was particularly venerated during the expulsion of the tyrant Gaultier de Brienne, Duke of Athens. .  Inv Camp 38,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic ivory diptych with scenes from the life of Christ and the Virgin made in Paris around 1370-1380.  inv 4089, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted alabaster statue of the Virgin of the annunciation, made around 1495 by Tilman Riemenschneider of Heiligenstadt im Eichsfeld, Germany The statue would have originally bee accompanied by another of the  Gabriel and both would have formed part of an altarpiece. Inv RF 1384,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted panels of the Martyrdom of Saint Catherine painted in 1524 by Hans Gieng of Fribourg.  From the church of Ependes near Fribourg, Switzerland. Inv RF 4721 The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Enamelled terracotta relief panel of the Virgin and Child with Cherubs by Andrea  della Robbia, Florence circa 1435-1525.  Inv  Campana 32,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Enamelled terracotta relief panel of the Virgin’s adoration of the Child in the presence of the infant Jean the Baptist by Andrea and Giovanni della Robbia, Florence circa 1500.  Inv LP 3410,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Enamelled terracotta relief panel of the Virgin and Child with two cherubs a copy of the “Madonna de l’Impuuneta” by Luca della Robbia, Florence 1399-1482).  Inv Campana 32,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Enamelled plaque depicting Christ in front of Pilate made in Limoges at the end of the 15th century, attributed to Master Pseudo-Monvaerni. inv 6309, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic reliquary of Saint Martin probably made in Avignon in the second quarter of the 14th century. From the church of Soudeilles, Correze, France.  inv 6459, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Gothic ivory diptych depicting the Annunciation, Nativity, the adoration of the Magi and the crucifixion  made in Paris in second quarter of the 14th century.  inv 103, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval elephant ivory plaque with traces of paint made in Italy in the 13th or start of the 14th century.  The crucifixion is a rare example of a Gothic piece being inspired by 11th century Romanesque works.  inv 7268, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval elephant ivory plaque with traces of paint made in Italy in the 13th or start of the 14th century.  The crucifixion is a rare example of a Gothic piece being inspired by 11th century Romanesque works.  inv 7268, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled crosier with palm leaf flower, beginning of the 13th century from Limoges, enamel on gold. Nieul-sur-L’Autise. AD. Inv OA 8105, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval enamelled crucifix, end of the 12th century from Limoges, enamel on gold. AD. Inv OA 7284, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval ivory Triptych relief panel depicting the Ascension, end of 11th cent. AD. Inv OA 6340, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval Bouquetin goats horn ivory crosier with traces of paint, circa 12th century from the south of Italy. Inv OA 11150, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval elephant ivory relief panel depicting the Crucifixtion. From southern Germany or north of Italy, end of 10th or 11th cent. AD. Inv. OA 12231, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval ivory relief panel depicting the arrest of Christ.  From the workshop of Charles-le-Chauve circa 870 AD.. Inv. OA 9526, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval ivory comb with a central relief panel depicting David defeating a Lion. Third quarter of the 9th cent. AD from Metz. Inv. OA 354, The Louvre Museum, Paris.

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