• The North Tower of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The tiled Alicante Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The Almera tiled Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • Panorama of Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Minoan North Lustral basin ,  Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Panorama of Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Panoroana of Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Minoan  North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Panorama of Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Panoroana of Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Minoan  North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Panorama of Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Panorama of Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Panoroana of Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Panoroana of Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Panorama of the Minoan North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Panorama of Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Panorama of Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Panoroana of Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Panorama of Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Panorama of Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • The so called Minoan 'Throne Room' or 'little throne room' Knossos Archaeological Site, Crete<br />
<br />
Reconstructed by Arthur Evans
  • Minoan North Lustral basin ,  Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • The so called Minoan 'Throne Room' or 'little throne room' Knossos Archaeological Site, Crete<br />
<br />
Reconstructed by Arthur Evans
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Panorama of the Minoan North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete. At sunset.
  • Panorama of Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Panorama of Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Panorama of Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Panoroana of Minoan of the North Entrance Propylaeum with its painted charging  bull releif,  Knossos Palace archaeological site, Crete
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Matera view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera from inside a Sassi cave, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.
  • Matera view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera from inside a Sassi cave, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic view of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Rock cave Christian church of St Agnes and its altar fresco dating from 11th century. Matera, Basilicata, Italy
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Vew of "la Gravina" ravine and the Sassi of Matera, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic ew of "la Gravina" ravine and the Sassi of Matera, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic ew of "la Gravina" ravine and the Sassi of Matera, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic view of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Vew of "la Gravina" ravine and the Sassi of Matera, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Vew of "la Gravina" ravine and the Sassi of Matera, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Vew of "la Gravina" ravine and the Sassi of Matera, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Matera view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera from inside a Sassi cave, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.
  • Matera view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera from inside a Sassi cave, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.
  • Matera view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera from inside a Sassi cave, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Etruscan circular Tumulus Tomb in one of the streets of the Necropoli della Banditaccia, Cerveteri, 6th century BC,  Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Interior of an Etruscan burial tomb known  with sarcopoghi carved out of the volcanic tuff rock, 6th century BC, Necropoli della Banditaccia, Cerveteri, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Interior of an Etruscan burial tomb known  with sarcopoghi carved out of the volcanic tuff rock, 6th century BC, Necropoli della Banditaccia, Cerveteri, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Etruscan circular Tumulus Tomb in one of the streets of the Necropoli della Banditaccia, Cerveteri, 6th century BC,  Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Interior of an Etruscan "dado: (dice) tomb known as Tomba Maroi dating form the 7th century BC, Necropoli della Banditaccia, Cerveteri, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Varlaam on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Roussanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of The Holy Trinity on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of Rossanou on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of The Holy Trinity on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of The Holy Trinity on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of The Holy Trinity on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of The Holy Trinity on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of The Holy Trinity on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of The Holy Trinity on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of The Holy Trinity on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Medieval Meteora  Monastery of The Holy Trinity on top of a rock pillar in the Meteora Mountains, Thessaly, Greece
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval relief carved architectural panels from the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval relief carved architectural panels from the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval relief carved architectural panels from the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval relief carved architectural panels from the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval relief carved architectural panels from the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave tomb of the Church of the Dormition cave cemetery, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings of the Dormition of the Virgin, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings of the Dormition of the Virgin, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings of Queen Tamar & Giorgi III, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings of Queen Tamar & Giorgi III, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings of Queen Tamar & Giorgi III, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings of Queen Tamar & Giorgi III, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior frescoes, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition Georgian inscription over door, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition Georgian inscription over door, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave interior of the city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave interior of the city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave interior of the city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave interior of the city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave interior of the city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave interior of the city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave interior of the city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave interior of the city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes

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