• Minoan  cult bronze double axe 'labrys' &  bronze spearhead from "warrior grave" at Knossos-Zafer Papoura,  1600-1400 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, white background.<br />
<br />
In Minoan Crete, the double axe was an important sacred symbol of the supposed Minoan religion. In Crete it never accompanies male gods, only female goddesses. It seems that it was the symbol of the arche of the creation (Mater-arche).
  • Minoan  cult bronze double axe 'labrys' &  bronze spearhead from "warrior grave" at Knossos-Zafer Papoura,  1600-1400 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, black background.<br />
<br />
In Minoan Crete, the double axe was an important sacred symbol of the supposed Minoan religion. In Crete it never accompanies male gods, only female goddesses. It seems that it was the symbol of the arche of the creation (Mater-arche).
  • Minoan  cult bronze double axe 'labrys' &  bronze spearhead from "warrior grave" at Knossos-Zafer Papoura,  1600-1400 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.<br />
<br />
In Minoan Crete, the double axe was an important sacred symbol of the supposed Minoan religion. In Crete it never accompanies male gods, only female goddesses. It seems that it was the symbol of the arche of the creation (Mater-arche).
  • Minoan  cult bronze double axe 'labrys' &  bronze spearhead from "warrior grave" at Knossos-Zafer Papoura,  1600-1400 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.<br />
<br />
In Minoan Crete, the double axe was an important sacred symbol of the supposed Minoan religion. In Crete it never accompanies male gods, only female goddesses. It seems that it was the symbol of the arche of the creation (Mater-arche).
  • Minoan  cult bronze double axe 'labrys' &  bronze spearhead from "warrior grave" at Knossos-Zafer Papoura,  1600-1400 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.<br />
<br />
In Minoan Crete, the double axe was an important sacred symbol of the supposed Minoan religion. In Crete it never accompanies male gods, only female goddesses. It seems that it was the symbol of the arche of the creation (Mater-arche).
  • Minoan  bronze spearhead from "warrior grave" at Knossos-Zafer Papoura,  1400-1300 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, black background.
  • Minoan  bronze spearhead from "warrior grave" at Knossos-Zafer Papoura,  1400-1300 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.
  • Minoan  bronze spearhead from "warrior grave" at Knossos-Zafer Papoura,  1400-1300 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, white background.
  • Minoan  bronze spearhead from "warrior grave" at Knossos-Zafer Papoura,  1400-1300 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.
  • Minoan  bronze spearhead from "warrior grave" at Knossos-Zafer Papoura,  1400-1300 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.
  • Hittite bronze spear heads. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC.  Hattusa Boğazkale. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey
  • Hittite bronze spear heads. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC.  Hattusa Boğazkale. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a warm art bacground.
  • Hittite bronze spear heads. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC, Ortakoy Sapinuva . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a black bacground.
  • Hittite bronze spear heads. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC, Ortakoy Sapinuva . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a warm art bacground.
  • Hittite bronze spear heads. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC.  Hattusa Boğazkale. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a white bacground.
  • Hittite bronze spear heads. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC.  Hattusa Boğazkale. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a black bacground.
  • Hittite bronze spear heads. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC.  Hattusa Boğazkale. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a grey bacground.
  • Hittite bronze spear heads. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC, Ortakoy Sapinuva . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey
  • Hittite bronze spear heads. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC, Ortakoy Sapinuva . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey
  • Hittite bronze spear heads. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC, Ortakoy Sapinuva . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a grey bacground.
  • Cycladic bronze spearhead.  Early Cycladic II (2800-2300 BC) , Amorgos. National Archaeological Museum Athens.  White background.
  • Cycladic bronze spearhead.  Early Cycladic II (2800-2300 BC) , Amorgos. National Archaeological Museum Athens.  Black background.
  • Cycladic bronze spearhead.  Early Cycladic II (2800-2300 BC) , Amorgos. National Archaeological Museum Athens.   Grey background.
  • Cycladic bronze spearhead.  Early Cycladic II (2800-2300 BC) , Amorgos. National Archaeological Museum Athens.   Gray background.
  • Cycladic bronze spearhead.  Early Cycladic II (2800-2300 BC) , Amorgos. National Archaeological Museum Athens.
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy

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