• Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Renaissance ceiling paintings by Benevento Tisi also known as il Garofalo, of the Ferrara Renaissance school of art, depicting an upward perspective scene, The Treasure Hall, Palazzo Costabili, National Archaeological Museum, Ferrara, Italy
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Bedroom D  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
This bedroom has a decoration very similar to that of cubiculum B in its arrangement and the use of cinnabar red. At the rear of the alcove three women perform a sacrificial ceremony in a rustic shrine. The walls of the antechamber have scenes of lovers, and most of the other pictures have to do with female life. Here carefully rendered details (attendants, handmaidens, furniture, glass and silver vessels) provide invaluable information on domestic life. There are also Egyptianizing elements, lotus flowers, sphinxes, and exotic landscapes. On the second column of the right wall is the inscription, in Greek, Seleukos made this, presumably the name of a Greek who was one of the artisans. The vaulted ceiling, in pure white stucco, has reliefs of initiation rites into the mysteries, idyllic landscapes with sacred elements, and combats between fantastic animals. The decorative scheme of the two bedrooms owes its inspiration to the deities Aphrodite and Dionysos. A fragment of geometric mosaic in black and white can be attributed to bedroom D on the basis of a contemporary watercolor.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Bedroom D  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
This bedroom has a decoration very similar to that of cubiculum B in its arrangement and the use of cinnabar red. At the rear of the alcove three women perform a sacrificial ceremony in a rustic shrine. The walls of the antechamber have scenes of lovers, and most of the other pictures have to do with female life. Here carefully rendered details (attendants, handmaidens, furniture, glass and silver vessels) provide invaluable information on domestic life. There are also Egyptianizing elements, lotus flowers, sphinxes, and exotic landscapes. On the second column of the right wall is the inscription, in Greek, Seleukos made this, presumably the name of a Greek who was one of the artisans. The vaulted ceiling, in pure white stucco, has reliefs of initiation rites into the mysteries, idyllic landscapes with sacred elements, and combats between fantastic animals. The decorative scheme of the two bedrooms owes its inspiration to the deities Aphrodite and Dionysos. A fragment of geometric mosaic in black and white can be attributed to bedroom D on the basis of a contemporary watercolor.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Bedroom E of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
Bedroom E, a private room with a bed (kline), was divided into antechamber and alcove. The room is probably a later reworking, as the doorway is off-center. The decoration of the walls, in contrast to cubicula B and D, is done in muted colors. Slender columns with a surreal superstructure frame aedicula with sacred landscapes. Three of these show travellers making a sacrifice to a herm of Athena. The images refer in various ways to the world of women. The little pictures along the walls of the antechamber show girls engaged in different activities. On the rear wall of the alcove, which has a picture with an amorous theme, the goddess Artemis is shown dressed as both huntress and moon goddess. Two Muses are on the opposite wall. The stucco decorations of the vaulted ceiling show idyllic landscapes with sacred elements and mythological scenes. In one, Phaethon asks his father Apollo to let him drive the chariot of the Sun. Other scenes show statues of Zeus, a statue probably representing Augustus as the new Mercury, disks of the sun, winged victories and grotesque figures, all done in very low relief with the elegance and delicacy of jewellery. The mosaic pavement of this room, known from a contemporary watercolor, had a pattern of squares and stars.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Bedroom D  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
This bedroom has a decoration very similar to that of cubiculum B in its arrangement and the use of cinnabar red. At the rear of the alcove three women perform a sacrificial ceremony in a rustic shrine. The walls of the antechamber have scenes of lovers, and most of the other pictures have to do with female life. Here carefully rendered details (attendants, handmaidens, furniture, glass and silver vessels) provide invaluable information on domestic life. There are also Egyptianizing elements, lotus flowers, sphinxes, and exotic landscapes. On the second column of the right wall is the inscription, in Greek, Seleukos made this, presumably the name of a Greek who was one of the artisans. The vaulted ceiling, in pure white stucco, has reliefs of initiation rites into the mysteries, idyllic landscapes with sacred elements, and combats between fantastic animals. The decorative scheme of the two bedrooms owes its inspiration to the deities Aphrodite and Dionysos. A fragment of geometric mosaic in black and white can be attributed to bedroom D on the basis of a contemporary watercolor.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Bedroom E of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
Bedroom E, a private room with a bed (kline), was divided into antechamber and alcove. The room is probably a later reworking, as the doorway is off-center. The decoration of the walls, in contrast to cubicula B and D, is done in muted colors. Slender columns with a surreal superstructure frame aedicula with sacred landscapes. Three of these show travellers making a sacrifice to a herm of Athena. The images refer in various ways to the world of women. The little pictures along the walls of the antechamber show girls engaged in different activities. On the rear wall of the alcove, which has a picture with an amorous theme, the goddess Artemis is shown dressed as both huntress and moon goddess. Two Muses are on the opposite wall. The stucco decorations of the vaulted ceiling show idyllic landscapes with sacred elements and mythological scenes. In one, Phaethon asks his father Apollo to let him drive the chariot of the Sun. Other scenes show statues of Zeus, a statue probably representing Augustus as the new Mercury, disks of the sun, winged victories and grotesque figures, all done in very low relief with the elegance and delicacy of jewellery. The mosaic pavement of this room, known from a contemporary watercolor, had a pattern of squares and stars.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomb of the Leopard A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design. In the tympanuim are painted two leopards below which is a banquet sceneOn the back wall is painted a banquet scene in honour of the dead. Circa 470 BC. Excavated 1857, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomb of the Leopard A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design. In the tympanuim are painted two leopards below which is a banquet sceneOn the back wall is painted a banquet scene in honour of the dead. Circa 470 BC. Excavated 1857, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomb of the Leopard A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design. In the tympanuim are painted two leopards below which is a banquet sceneOn the back wall is painted a banquet scene in honour of the dead. Circa 470 BC. Excavated 1857, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomb of the Leopard A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design. In the tympanuim are painted two leopards below which is a banquet sceneOn the back wall is painted a banquet scene in honour of the dead. Circa 470 BC. Excavated 1857, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba del Fiore di Loto". A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted ca flower design. In the typanium on the back wall are a painted Lion and panther.  Circa 520 BC. Excavated 1962, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba delle Leonesse". A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design. Six painted columns divide the walls to give the tomb the appearance of a pavillion. In the typanium of the back wall are two lionesses below which is a large Krater used to mix water and wine, flanked by two musicians and a female dancer.  Circa 520 BC. Excavated 1874, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba delle Leonesse". A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design. Six painted columns divide the walls to give the tomb the appearance of a pavillion. In the typanium of the back wall are two lionesses below which is a large Krater used to mix water and wine, flanked by two musicians and a female dancer.  Circa 520 BC. Excavated 1874, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba delle Leonesse". A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design. Six painted columns divide the walls to give the tomb the appearance of a pavillion. In the typanium of the back wall are two lionesses below which is a large Krater used to mix water and wine, flanked by two musicians and a female dancer.  Circa 520 BC. Excavated 1874, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba delle Leonesse". A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design. Six painted columns divide the walls to give the tomb the appearance of a pavillion. In the typanium of the back wall are two lionesses below which is a large Krater used to mix water and wine, flanked by two musicians and a female dancer.  Circa 520 BC. Excavated 1874, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba delle Leonesse". A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design. Six painted columns divide the walls to give the tomb the appearance of a pavillion. In the typanium of the back wall are two lionesses below which is a large Krater used to mix water and wine, flanked by two musicians and a female dancer.  Circa 520 BC. Excavated 1874, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba delle Leonesse". A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design. Six painted columns divide the walls to give the tomb the appearance of a pavillion. In the typanium of the back wall are two lionesses below which is a large Krater used to mix water and wine, flanked by two musicians and a female dancer.  Circa 520 BC. Excavated 1874, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb  A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba Claudio Bettini no 5513" A single chamber with double sloping ceiling. In the tympanium on the back wall is a painted two lions, a two men lying on beds (Klinai) are  banquetting with two women bellow. On the dide walls are dancers and musicians. 5th century BC. Excavated 1967 , Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba Claudio Bettini no 5513" A single chamber with double sloping ceiling. In the tympanium on the back wall is a painted two lions, a two men lying on beds (Klinai) are  banquetting with two women bellow. On the dide walls are dancers and musicians. 5th century BC. Excavated 1967 , Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb  A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba Claudio Bettini no 5513" A single chamber with double sloping ceiling. In the tympanium on the back wall is a painted two lions, a two men lying on beds (Klinai) are  banquetting with two women bellow. On the dide walls are dancers and musicians. 5th century BC. Excavated 1967 , Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba dei Fiorellini" A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with red circles and three petalled flowers. In the tympanium on the back wall is a painted pillar and two cockerals, a couple are depicted banquetting bellow. 475-450 BC. Excavated 1960 , Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba Massimo Pallottino no 3713". A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated. On the back wall are a painted dancing harpist, and couples dancing holding dinking cups.  Circa 580 BC. Excavated 1962, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba del Cacciatore A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design, the rest of the tomb is decorated like a hunting tent with hanging wild ducks and hats. 510-500 BC. Excavated 1962, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba del Cacciatore A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design, the rest of the tomb is decorated like a hunting tent with hanging wild ducks and hats. 510-500 BC. Excavated 1962, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba della Caccia al Cervo" A single chamber with double sloping ceiling. On the back wall is painted a banquet scene with three couples lying on beds (Klinai). On the dide walls are dancers and musicians. Circa 450 BC. Excavated 1960 , Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba Claudio Bettini no 5513" A single chamber with double sloping ceiling. In the tympanium on the back wall is a painted two lions, a two men lying on beds (Klinai) are  banquetting with two women bellow. On the dide walls are dancers and musicians. 5th century BC. Excavated 1967 , Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba dei Fiorellini" A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with red circles and three petalled flowers. In the tympanium on the back wall is a painted pillar and two cockerals, a couple are depicted banquetting bellow. 475-450 BC. Excavated 1960 , Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba dei Fiorellini" A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with red circles and three petalled flowers. In the tympanium on the back wall is a painted pillar and two cockerals, a couple are depicted banquetting bellow. 475-450 BC. Excavated 1960 , Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba Massimo Pallottino no 3713". A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated. On the back wall are a painted dancing harpist, and couples dancing holding dinking cups.  Circa 580 BC. Excavated 1962, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb  A single chamber with double sloping ceiling. In the tympanium are two wild animals below wich is a scene with a portait of the deceased seated watching a dancer and a flute player. Circa 400 BC, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba della Caccia e della Pesca". A double chamber with double sloping ceiling. In the tsecond chamber can be see a scene of hunting and fishing in the style of the "little Ionic masters" . 520-510 BC. Excavated 1873 , Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba Cardarelli" A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with circles. In the tympanium has a scene of fighting animals below which is a flute player, a male figure holding a kylix. 510-500 BC. Excavated 1959 , Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Maurio Moretti no 5591" A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with flowers. In the tympanium are two lions below which is a flute player, a male figure holding a kylix and a richly dressed female figure. 500-490 BC. Excavated 1968 , Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb  A single chamber with double sloping ceiling. In the tympanium are two wild animals below wich is a scene with a portait of the deceased seated watching a dancer and a flute player. Circa 400 BC, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb  A single chamber with double sloping ceiling. In the tympanium are two wild animals below wich is a scene with a portait of the deceased seated watching a dancer and a flute player. Circa 400 BC, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba Cardarelli" A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with circles. In the tympanium has a scene of fighting animals below which is a flute player, a male figure holding a kylix. 510-500 BC. Excavated 1959 , Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba Cardarelli" A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with circles. In the tympanium has a scene of fighting animals below which is a flute player, a male figure holding a kylix. 510-500 BC. Excavated 1959 , Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Berber Arabesque painted ceiling panels.The Grand Court, Bahia Palace, Marrakesh, Morroco
  • Berber Arabesque painted ceiling panels.The Grand Court, Bahia Palace, Marrakesh, Morroco
  • Berber Arabesque painted ceiling panels.The Grand Court, Bahia Palace, Marrakesh, Morroco
  • Berber arabesque painted wood ceiling.The Petite Court, Bahia Palace, Marrakesh, Morroco
  • Berber arabesque painted wood ceiling.The Petite Court, Bahia Palace, Marrakesh, Morroco
  • Berber arabesque painted wood ceiling.The Petite Court, Bahia Palace, Marrakesh, Morroco
  • Berber arabesque painted wood ceiling.The Petite Court, Bahia Palace, Marrakesh, Morroco
  • Berber arabesque painted wood ceiling.The Petite Court, Bahia Palace, Marrakesh, Morroco
  • Berber arabesque painted wood ceiling.The Petite Court, Bahia Palace, Marrakesh, Morroco
  • Room of Glory (Stanza della Gloria ). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-68. The frescoes in the vaulted ceiling depict the virtues which consent the fulfilment of "Glory" with allegorical panels depicting Magnanimity, Fortune, Time and Religion. Trompe-l'?il alcoves reveal the Cardinals hat of Ippolito d'Este  . Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Room of Glory (Stanza della Gloria ). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-68. The frescoes in the vaulted ceiling depict the virtues which consent the fulfilment of "Glory" with allegorical panels depicting Magnanimity, Fortune, Time and Religion. Trompe-l'?il alcoves reveal the Cardinals hat of Ippolito d'Este  . Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Berber arabesque painted wood ceiling.The Petite Court, Bahia Palace, Marrakesh, Morroco
  • Room of Glory (Stanza della Gloria ). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-68. The frescoes in the vaulted ceiling depict the virtues which consent the fulfilment of "Glory" with allegorical panels depicting Magnanimity, Fortune, Time and Religion. Trompe-l'?il alcoves reveal the Cardinals hat of Ippolito d'Este  . Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Berber arabesque wood inlaid ceiling.The Petite Court, Bahia Palace, Marrakesh, Morroco
  • Room of Hercules ( Sala di Ercole ) Celebrating the deeds of Hercules, the hero of Tivoli, the renaissance frecoes were carried out by 6 assistants of Girolamo Muziano (1532-1592). The central ceiling panel frescoes depict the epilogue of the myth, the Apotheosis of Hercules : the hero is welcomed by the 12 major divinities of Olympus in thanks for his labours. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Painted vaulted ceiling of the Cattedrale di San Martino,  Duomo of Lucca, Tunscany, Italy,
  • Painted vaulted ceiling of the Cattedrale di San Martino,  Duomo of Lucca, Tunscany, Italy,
  • Painted vaulted ceiling of the Cattedrale di San Martino,  Duomo of Lucca, Tunscany, Italy,
  • The Autumn Room- Frescoes on the vaulted ceiling depict the meetingbetween Bacchus and Ariadne, by Antonio de Dominici. Over the doors & mirrors are paintings by Gerolamo Starace painted between 1780-81, showing the mythical subjects of : Ceres, Allorgories of Dianna, Vulca, The Allagories of Saturn, Juno and Apollo. The Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • The Autumn Room- Frescoes on the vaulted ceiling depict the meetingbetween Bacchus and Ariadne, by Antonio de Dominici. Over the doors & mirrors are paintings by Gerolamo Starace painted between 1780-81, showing the mythical subjects of : Ceres, Allorgories of Dianna, Vulca, The Allagories of Saturn, Juno and Apollo. The Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • The Room of Summer - Frescoes on the vaulted ceiling depict the myth of Proserpine who, during the summer, rises from the dead to her mother Ceres, painted by Fedele Fischetti. Above the doors paintings by Giovan Battista de Rossi depict the Allegories of the liberal arts alternated with representations of the Rivers of the Kingdom of Naples. The Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • The Room of Summer - Frescoes on the vaulted ceiling depict the myth of Proserpine who, during the summer, rises from the dead to her mother Ceres, painted by Fedele Fischetti. Above the doors paintings by Giovan Battista de Rossi depict the Allegories of the liberal arts alternated with representations of the Rivers of the Kingdom of Naples. The Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • The Autumn Room- Frescoes on the vaulted ceiling depict the meetingbetween Bacchus and Ariadne, by Antonio de Dominici. Over the doors & mirrors are paintings by Gerolamo Starace painted between 1780-81, showing the mythical subjects of : Ceres, Allorgories of Dianna, Vulca, The Allagories of Saturn, Juno and Apollo. The Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • The Room of Summer - Frescoes on the vaulted ceiling depict the myth of Proserpine who, during the summer, rises from the dead to her mother Ceres, painted by Fedele Fischetti. Above the doors paintings by Giovan Battista de Rossi depict the Allegories of the liberal arts alternated with representations of the Rivers of the Kingdom of Naples. The Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century v Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century  Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. v
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Berber Arabesque decorative Zellige tiles and painted wood ceiling of Bou Ahmed's Harem. Bahia Palace, Marrakesh, Morroco
  • Berber Arabesque decorative Zellige tiles and painted wood ceiling of Bou Ahmed's Harem. Bahia Palace, Marrakesh, Morroco
  • Berber arabesque painted wood ceiling and Morcabe platerwork door surrounds.The Petite Court, Bahia Palace, Marrakesh, Morroco
  • Berber arabesque painted wood ceiling and Morcabe platerwork door surrounds.The Petite Court, Bahia Palace, Marrakesh, Morroco
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additio-nal details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a grey art background.
  • Berber Arabesque decorative Zellige tiles and painted wood ceiling of Bou Ahmed's Harem. Bahia Palace, Marrakesh, Morroco
  • Berber Arabesque decorative Zellige tiles and painted wood ceiling of Bou Ahmed's Harem. Bahia Palace, Marrakesh, Morroco
  • Berber Arabesque decorative Zellige tiles and painted wood ceiling of Bou Ahmed's Harem. Bahia Palace, Marrakesh, Morroco
  • Berber arabesque painted wood ceiling and Morcabe platerwork door surrounds.The Petite Court, Bahia Palace, Marrakesh, Morroco

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