• Young Svab children in traditional dress dancing at the wine harvest festival , Hajos (Hajós) Hungary
  • Young Svab children in traditional dress dancing at the wine harvest festival , Hajos (Hajós) Hungary
  • Young Svab children in traditional dress dancing at the wine harvest festival , Hajos (Hajós) Hungary
  • Young Svab children in traditional dress dancing at the wine harvest festival , Hajos (Hajós) Hungary
  • Young Svab children in traditional dress dancing at the wine harvest festival , Hajos (Hajós) Hungary
  • Young Svab children in traditional dress dancing at the wine harvest festival , Hajos (Hajós) Hungary
  • Young Svab children in traditional dress dancing at the wine harvest festival , Hajos (Hajós) Hungary
  • A procession of Roman Catholic children in white cassocks  for their first communion or confirmation. Trogir Croatia
  • A procession of Roman Catholic children in white cassocks  for their first communion or confirmation. Trogir Croatia
  • A procession of Roman Catholic children in white cassocks  for their first communion or confirmation. Trogir Croatia
  • A procession of Roman Catholic children in white cassocks  for their first communion or confirmation. Trogir Croatia
  • A procession of Roman Catholic children in white cassocks  for their first communion or confirmation. Trogir Croatia
  • A procession of Roman Catholic children in white cassocks  for their first communion or confirmation. Trogir Croatia
  • A procession of Roman Catholic children in white cassocks  for their first communion or confirmation. Trogir Croatia
  • A procession of Roman Catholic children in white cassocks  for their first communion or confirmation. Trogir Croatia
  • A procession of Roman Catholic children in white cassocks  for their first communion or confirmation. Trogir Croatia
  • A procession of Roman Catholic children in white cassocks  for their first communion or confirmation. Trogir Croatia
  • Runswick Bay - North Yorkshire - England - children jumping waves
  • Sailing boats in harbour with Italian style buildings & church. Piran , Slovenia
  • Harour entance with people relaxing and fishing off the harbour wall with a sailing boat. Piran , Slovenia
  • FGox Terrier puppy on a childs wheel around
  • Sailing boats in harbour with Italian style buildings & church. Piran , Slovenia
  • Harour entance with people relaxing and fishing off the harbour wall. Pirates ship.  Piran , Slovenia
  • Harour entance with people relaxing and swimming off the harbour wall. Piran , Slovenia
  • Real Fox Terrier Dog kissing a toy Fox Terrier on  push along wheels
  • Fine Art Black and White Pictures Wall Art Prints Polaroid Photos " Children Of The Revolution” by photographer Paul Williams depict the harrowing images of children at war in an abstract fine art photography prints series.<br />
<br />
"When the Balkan war broke out it was not long before we saw photos of white kids being caught up in battle. In my life time I have become immune to seeing black and asian kids with guns and it was a shock to see children that could have been mine at war. So as a protest I made the photo series "Children Of The Revolution" with my kids to remind myself that it is always better to talk and understand than fight." Paul Williams
  • Fine Art Black and White Pictures Wall Art Prints Polaroid Photos " Children Of The Revolution” by photographer Paul Williams depict the harrowing images of children at war in an abstract fine art photography prints series.<br />
<br />
"When the Balkan war broke out it was not long before we saw photos of white kids being caught up in battle. In my life time I have become immune to seeing black and asian kids with guns and it was a shock to see children that could have been mine at war. So as a protest I made the photo series "Children Of The Revolution" with my kids to remind myself that it is always better to talk and understand than fight." Paul Williams
  • Fine Art Black and White Pictures Wall Art Prints Polaroid Photos " Children Of The Revolution” by photographer Paul Williams depict the harrowing images of children at war in an abstract fine art photography prints series.<br />
<br />
"When the Balkan war broke out it was not long before we saw photos of white kids being caught up in battle. In my life time I have become immune to seeing black and asian kids with guns and it was a shock to see children that could have been mine at war. So as a protest I made the photo series "Children Of The Revolution" with my kids to remind myself that it is always better to talk and understand than fight." Paul Williams
  • Fine Art Black and White Pictures Wall Art Prints Polaroid Photos " Children Of The Revolution” by photographer Paul Williams depict the harrowing images of children at war in an abstract fine art photography prints series.<br />
<br />
"When the Balkan war broke out it was not long before we saw photos of white kids being caught up in battle. In my life time I have become immune to seeing black and asian kids with guns and it was a shock to see children that could have been mine at war. So as a protest I made the photo series "Children Of The Revolution" with my kids to remind myself that it is always better to talk and understand than fight." Paul Williams
  • Fine Art Black and White Pictures Wall Art Prints Polaroid Photos " Children Of The Revolution” by photographer Paul Williams depict the harrowing images of children at war in an abstract fine art photography prints series.<br />
<br />
"When the Balkan war broke out it was not long before we saw photos of white kids being caught up in battle. In my life time I have become immune to seeing black and asian kids with guns and it was a shock to see children that could have been mine at war. So as a protest I made the photo series "Children Of The Revolution" with my kids to remind myself that it is always better to talk and understand than fight." Paul Williams
  • Fine Art Black and White Pictures Wall Art Prints Polaroid Photos " Children Of The Revolution” by photographer Paul Williams depict the harrowing images of children at war in an abstract fine art photography prints series.<br />
<br />
"When the Balkan war broke out it was not long before we saw photos of white kids being caught up in battle. In my life time I have become immune to seeing black and asian kids with guns and it was a shock to see children that could have been mine at war. So as a protest I made the photo series "Children Of The Revolution" with my kids to remind myself that it is always better to talk and understand than fight." Paul Williams
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of the Chidrens's Hunt depicting children hunting animals, room no 44 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic on the floor of the cubicle of the Child Hunt in the Villa Romana del Casale is divided into three registers with a floral theme.<br />
<br />
In the first register boys are spearing a hare with a venabulum ( spear) while to their right another boy has trapped a duckling. <br />
<br />
In the second register tree young hunters are portrayed being attacked by animals, one boy has fallen down having been bitten on the calf by a weasel. The boy in the middle has his hands raised calling for help and to his right a boy is about to be attacked bu a cockerel.<br />
<br />
In the lower register a boy is holding a raised club about to hit a peacock while another boy is spearing a goat and another is using a shield to protect himself from a Great Bustard.
  • Wide picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of the Chidrens's Hunt depicting children hunting animals, room no 44 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic on the floor of the cubicle of the Child Hunt in the Villa Romana del Casale is divided into three registers with a floral theme.<br />
<br />
In the first register boys are spearing a hare with a venabulum ( spear) while to their right another boy has trapped a duckling. <br />
<br />
In the second register tree young hunters are portrayed being attacked by animals, one boy has fallen down having been bitten on the calf by a weasel. The boy in the middle has his hands raised calling for help and to his right a boy is about to be attacked bu a cockerel.<br />
<br />
In the lower register a boy is holding a raised club about to hit a peacock while another boy is spearing a goat and another is using a shield to protect himself from a Great Bustard.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of the Chidrens's Hunt depicting children hunting animals, room no 44 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic on the floor of the cubicle of the Child Hunt in the Villa Romana del Casale is divided into three registers with a floral theme.<br />
<br />
In the first register boys are spearing a hare with a venabulum ( spear) while to their right another boy has trapped a duckling. <br />
<br />
In the second register tree young hunters are portrayed being attacked by animals, one boy has fallen down having been bitten on the calf by a weasel. The boy in the middle has his hands raised calling for help and to his right a boy is about to be attacked bu a cockerel.<br />
<br />
In the lower register a boy is holding a raised club about to hit a peacock while another boy is spearing a goat and another is using a shield to protect himself from a Great Bustard.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of the Chidrens's Hunt depicting children hunting animals, room no 44 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic on the floor of the cubicle of the Child Hunt in the Villa Romana del Casale is divided into three registers with a floral theme.<br />
<br />
In the first register boys are spearing a hare with a venabulum ( spear) while to their right another boy has trapped a duckling. <br />
<br />
In the second register tree young hunters are portrayed being attacked by animals, one boy has fallen down having been bitten on the calf by a weasel. The boy in the middle has his hands raised calling for help and to his right a boy is about to be attacked bu a cockerel.<br />
<br />
In the lower register a boy is holding a raised club about to hit a peacock while another boy is spearing a goat and another is using a shield to protect himself from a Great Bustard.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of the Chidrens's Hunt depicting children hunting animals, room no 44 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic on the floor of the cubicle of the Child Hunt in the Villa Romana del Casale is divided into three registers with a floral theme.<br />
<br />
In the first register boys are spearing a hare with a venabulum ( spear) while to their right another boy has trapped a duckling. <br />
<br />
In the second register tree young hunters are portrayed being attacked by animals, one boy has fallen down having been bitten on the calf by a weasel. The boy in the middle has his hands raised calling for help and to his right a boy is about to be attacked bu a cockerel.<br />
<br />
In the lower register a boy is holding a raised club about to hit a peacock while another boy is spearing a goat and another is using a shield to protect himself from a Great Bustard.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of the Chidrens's Hunt depicting children hunting animals, room no 44 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic on the floor of the cubicle of the Child Hunt in the Villa Romana del Casale is divided into three registers with a floral theme.<br />
<br />
In the first register boys are spearing a hare with a venabulum ( spear) while to their right another boy has trapped a duckling. <br />
<br />
In the second register tree young hunters are portrayed being attacked by animals, one boy has fallen down having been bitten on the calf by a weasel. The boy in the middle has his hands raised calling for help and to his right a boy is about to be attacked bu a cockerel.<br />
<br />
In the lower register a boy is holding a raised club about to hit a peacock while another boy is spearing a goat and another is using a shield to protect himself from a Great Bustard.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of the Chidrens's Hunt depicting children hunting animals, room no 44 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic on the floor of the cubicle of the Child Hunt in the Villa Romana del Casale is divided into three registers with a floral theme.<br />
<br />
In the first register boys are spearing a hare with a venabulum ( spear) while to their right another boy has trapped a duckling. <br />
<br />
In the second register tree young hunters are portrayed being attacked by animals, one boy has fallen down having been bitten on the calf by a weasel. The boy in the middle has his hands raised calling for help and to his right a boy is about to be attacked bu a cockerel.<br />
<br />
In the lower register a boy is holding a raised club about to hit a peacock while another boy is spearing a goat and another is using a shield to protect himself from a Great Bustard.
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a mouyring widow and two children sitting by the doors of the tomb with an angel. The Patrone tomb sculpted by S Varni 1976. Section D, no 23, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a mouyring widow and two children sitting by the doors of the tomb with an angel. The Patrone tomb sculpted by S Varni 1976. Section D, no 23, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a mouyring widow and two children sitting by the doors of the tomb with an angel. The Patrone tomb sculpted by S Varni 1976. Section D, no 23, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a mouyring widow and two children sitting by the doors of the tomb with an angel. The Patrone tomb sculpted by S Varni 1976. Section D, no 23, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a mouyring widow and two children sitting by the doors of the tomb with an angel. The Patrone tomb sculpted by S Varni 1976. Section D, no 23, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Roma children's chariot race from The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roma children's chariot race from The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roma children's chariot race from The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roma children's chariot race from The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roma children's chariot race from The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roma children's chariot race from The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roma children's chariot race from The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world, circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roma children's chariot race from The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world, circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roma children's chariot race from The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world, circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Aineas Fleeing Troy with his wife & children from the Oda first room, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Aineas Fleeing Troy with his wife & children from the Oda first room, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Aineas Fleeing Troy with his wife & children from the Oda first room, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Aineas Fleeing Troy with his wife & children from the Oda first room, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Aineas Fleeing Troy with his wife & children from the Oda first room, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Aineas Fleeing Troy with his wife & children from the Oda first room, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a white background<br />
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The Silenus Roman mosaic depicts multiple scenes : the tying up of Silenus, who is permanently drunk, and is depicted in the middle of the mosaic lying on a bed of leaves. Around him children are trying to tie his hands and legs with garlands of flowers.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against an art background<br />
<br />
The Silenus Roman mosaic depicts multiple scenes : the tying up of Silenus, who is permanently drunk, and is depicted in the middle of the mosaic lying on a bed of leaves. Around him children are trying to tie his hands and legs with garlands of flowers.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a grey background<br />
<br />
The Silenus Roman mosaic depicts multiple scenes : the tying up of Silenus, who is permanently drunk, and is depicted in the middle of the mosaic lying on a bed of leaves. Around him children are trying to tie his hands and legs with garlands of flowers.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the Trapedoizal Vestibule room, the so called Domina of the Villa, probably Eutropia the wife of Emperor Maximinianus, accompanied by her children, room no 16 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
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The Trapedoizal Vestibule was probably a private entrance to the Villa Romana del Casale. The Roman mosaics of the Trapedoizal Vestibule depicts the Domina (mistress) of the house, wife of Emperor Maximianus, Eutropia at  its centre. To her right if Maxentius and to her left is Fausta
  • wide shot of the Roman mosaics of the room of the Small Circus depicting Roman boys riding small chariots pulled by birds in a small circus, The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic know as the Small Circus at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene of a chariot race from the Circus Maximus in Rome. Two wheeled chariots, driven by children,  are racing around a central Pina (barrier) being drawn by fowl and web footed birds. The four chariots represent the four factions that raced against each other at the Circus and the tunics of the cild charioteers and the birds pulling their chariots are distinguished by the four different colours used by each faction.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the room of the Small Circus depicting Roman boys riding small chariots pulled by birds in a small circus, The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic know as the Small Circus at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene of a chariot race from the Circus Maximus in Rome. Two wheeled chariots, driven by children,  are racing around a central Pina (barrier) being drawn by fowl and web footed birds. The four chariots represent the four factions that raced against each other at the Circus and the tunics of the cild charioteers and the birds pulling their chariots are distinguished by the four different colours used by each faction.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the room of the Small Circus depicting Roman boys riding small chariots pulled by birds in a small circus, The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic know as the Small Circus at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene of a chariot race from the Circus Maximus in Rome. Two wheeled chariots, driven by children,  are racing around a central Pina (barrier) being drawn by fowl and web footed birds. The four chariots represent the four factions that raced against each other at the Circus and the tunics of the cild charioteers and the birds pulling their chariots are distinguished by the four different colours used by each faction.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the room of the Small Circus depicting Roman boys riding small chariots pulled by geese in a small circus, The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic know as the Small Circus at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene of a chariot race from the Circus Maximus in Rome. Two wheeled chariots, driven by children,  are racing around a central Pina (barrier) being drawn by fowl and web footed birds. The four chariots represent the four factions that raced against each other at the Circus and the tunics of the cild charioteers and the birds pulling their chariots are distinguished by the four different colours used by each faction.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the room of the Small Circus depicting Roman boys riding small chariots pulled by geese in a small circus, The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic know as the Small Circus at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene of a chariot race from the Circus Maximus in Rome. Two wheeled chariots, driven by children,  are racing around a central Pina (barrier) being drawn by fowl and web footed birds. The four chariots represent the four factions that raced against each other at the Circus and the tunics of the cild charioteers and the birds pulling their chariots are distinguished by the four different colours used by each faction.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the room of the Small Circus depicting Roman boys riding small chariots pulled by birds in a small circus, The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic know as the Small Circus at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene of a chariot race from the Circus Maximus in Rome. Two wheeled chariots, driven by children,  are racing around a central Pina (barrier) being drawn by fowl and web footed birds. The four chariots represent the four factions that raced against each other at the Circus and the tunics of the cild charioteers and the birds pulling their chariots are distinguished by the four different colours used by each faction.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the room of the Small Circus depicting Roman boys riding small chariots pulled by pigeons in a small circus, The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic know as the Small Circus at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene of a chariot race from the Circus Maximus in Rome. Two wheeled chariots, driven by children,  are racing around a central Pina (barrier) being drawn by fowl and web footed birds. The four chariots represent the four factions that raced against each other at the Circus and the tunics of the cild charioteers and the birds pulling their chariots are distinguished by the four different colours used by each faction.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the room of the Small Circus depicting Roman boys riding small chariots pulled by birds in a small circus, The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic know as the Small Circus at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene of a chariot race from the Circus Maximus in Rome. Two wheeled chariots, driven by children,  are racing around a central Pina (barrier) being drawn by fowl and web footed birds. The four chariots represent the four factions that raced against each other at the Circus and the tunics of the cild charioteers and the birds pulling their chariots are distinguished by the four different colours used by each faction.
  • Wide picture of the Roman mosaics of the room of the Small Circus depicting Roman boys riding small chariots pulled by birds in a small circus, The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic know as the Small Circus at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene of a chariot race from the Circus Maximus in Rome. Two wheeled chariots, driven by children,  are racing around a central Pina (barrier) being drawn by fowl and web footed birds. The four chariots represent the four factions that raced against each other at the Circus and the tunics of the cild charioteers and the birds pulling their chariots are distinguished by the four different colours used by each faction.
  • Wide picture of the Roman mosaics of the room of the Small Circus depicting Roman boys riding small chariots pulled by birds in a small circus, The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic know as the Small Circus at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene of a chariot race from the Circus Maximus in Rome. Two wheeled chariots, driven by children,  are racing around a central Pina (barrier) being drawn by fowl and web footed birds. The four chariots represent the four factions that raced against each other at the Circus and the tunics of the cild charioteers and the birds pulling their chariots are distinguished by the four different colours used by each faction.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel1 (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Second From left panel 2  -  King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Panel 3 - This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.<br />
 <br />
Panel 4 - The queen carries her youngest son. The hieroglyphs located above read; "and this is Tuwarsais; the prince desired by the ruler, whose exclusiveness has been exposed". While the queen carries her son in her lap, she holds the rope of the colt coming behind with her other hand. The muscles of the colt are schematic. <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel1 (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Second From left panel 2  -  King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Panel 3 - This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.<br />
 <br />
Panel 4 - The queen carries her youngest son. The hieroglyphs located above read; "and this is Tuwarsais; the prince desired by the ruler, whose exclusiveness has been exposed". While the queen carries her son in her lap, she holds the rope of the colt coming behind with her other hand. The muscles of the colt are schematic. <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel1 (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Second From left panel 2  -  King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Panel 3 - This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.<br />
 <br />
Panel 4 - The queen carries her youngest son. The hieroglyphs located above read; "and this is Tuwarsais; the prince desired by the ruler, whose exclusiveness has been exposed". While the queen carries her son in her lap, she holds the rope of the colt coming behind with her other hand. The muscles of the colt are schematic. <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.  <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.  <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.  <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.  <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Aineas Fleeing Troy with his wife & children from the Oda first room, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to St Sylvester.  Bottom left - The young Sylvester presented by his mother to the priest Cyrinus, bottom right - Sylvester welcoming St Timothy to his house. Bottom side panels right - above right - Execution of St Timothy , side panel left - Death of the prefect Tarquin, who chokes on a fish bone. Two centre panels, left- Funeral of St Timothy, right - Sylvester refusing the prefect's orders to worship an idol. Top central oval panel - Sylvester released from prison by Pope Melchiades. Above left - People beg Sylvester (holding book) to become a deacon, above right - Sylvester is ordained by Melchiades as deacon. Top side panel , right - After the death of Melchiades Sylvester installed as Pope, left - Emperor Constantine falls ill (note doctor with urine flask). Top two panels - left -  Constantine orders sacrifices to an idol, right - Pope Sylvester and his followers flee persecution. Top central oval panel - Soldiers about to prepare a bath with the blood of 3000 children. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic of soldiers killing children from the 14th century " Slaughter of the Innocents" from the east wall of the ante baptistery. Basilica San Marco ( St Mark's Basilica ) Venice, Italy
  • Mosaic of soldiers killing children from the 14th century " Slaughter of the Innocents" from the east wall of the ante baptistery. Basilica San Marco ( St Mark's Basilica ) Venice, Italy
  • Mosaic of soldiers killing children from the 14th century " Slaughter of the Innocents" from the east wall of the ante baptistery. Basilica San Marco ( St Mark's Basilica ) Venice, Italy
  • Young Svab children in traditional dress, Hajos (Hajós) Hungary
  • traditional children dancers in local german Svab traditional  dress - Annual wine harvest festival ( szuret fesztival ) . Hajos ( Hajós); Hungary
  • traditional children dancers in local german Svab traditional  dress - Annual wine harvest festival ( szuret fesztival ) . Hajos ( Hajós); Hungary
  • traditional children dancers in local german Svab traditional  dress - Annual wine harvest festival ( szuret fesztival ) . Hajos ( Hajós); Hungary
  • Városliget. Children skiing in the City park in the snow - Budapest Hungary
  • Children Skiing - Insbruck - Austrian Tyrol
  • Karamoja, Uganda , Africa. - Karamajong children
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
The Silenus Roman mosaic depicts multiple scenes : the tying up of Silenus, who is permanently drunk, and is depicted in the middle of the mosaic lying on a bed of leaves. Around him children are trying to tie his hands and legs with garlands of flowers.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
The Silenus Roman mosaic depicts multiple scenes : the tying up of Silenus, who is permanently drunk, and is depicted in the middle of the mosaic lying on a bed of leaves. Around him children are trying to tie his hands and legs with garlands of flowers.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
The Silenus Roman mosaic depicts multiple scenes : the tying up of Silenus, who is permanently drunk, and is depicted in the middle of the mosaic lying on a bed of leaves. Around him children are trying to tie his hands and legs with garlands of flowers.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
The Silenus Roman mosaic depicts multiple scenes : the tying up of Silenus, who is permanently drunk, and is depicted in the middle of the mosaic lying on a bed of leaves. Around him children are trying to tie his hands and legs with garlands of flowers.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a black background<br />
<br />
The Silenus Roman mosaic depicts multiple scenes : the tying up of Silenus, who is permanently drunk, and is depicted in the middle of the mosaic lying on a bed of leaves. Around him children are trying to tie his hands and legs with garlands of flowers.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Silenus and Cupids, from the House of Sienus, ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
The Silenus Roman mosaic depicts multiple scenes : the tying up of Silenus, who is permanently drunk, and is depicted in the middle of the mosaic lying on a bed of leaves. Around him children are trying to tie his hands and legs with garlands of flowers.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the Trapedoizal Vestibule room, the so called Domina of the Villa, probably Eutropia the wife of Emperor Maximinianus, accompanied by her children, room no 16 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Trapedoizal Vestibule was probably a private entrance to the Villa Romana del Casale. The Roman mosaics of the Trapedoizal Vestibule depicts the Domina (mistress) of the house, wife of Emperor Maximianus, Eutropia at  its centre. To her right if Maxentius and to her left is Fausta
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel1 (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Second From left panel 2  -  King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Panel 3 - This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.<br />
 <br />
Panel 4 - The queen carries her youngest son. The hieroglyphs located above read; "and this is Tuwarsais; the prince desired by the ruler, whose exclusiveness has been exposed". While the queen carries her son in her lap, she holds the rope of the colt coming behind with her other hand. The muscles of the colt are schematic. <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.
  • Picture & image of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.  <br />
<br />
Against a gray background.
  • The so called Domina of the Villa, probably Eutropia the wife of Emperor Maximinianus, accompanied by her children from the Trapedoizal Vestibule room no 16. Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed  in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Aineas Fleeing Troy with his wife & children from the Oda first room, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints
  • Young Svab children in traditional dress, Hajos (Hajós) Hungary
  • traditional children dancers in local german Svab traditional  dress - Annual wine harvest festival ( szuret fesztival ) . Hajos ( Hajós); Hungary
  • traditional children dancers in local german Svab traditional  dress - Annual wine harvest festival ( szuret fesztival ) . Hajos ( Hajós); Hungary
  • Karamoja, Uganda , Africa. - Karamajong children
  • children playing - Runswick Bay - North Yorkshire - England
  • Childrens fishing nets.  Robin Hood's Bay, Near Whitby, North Yorkshire, England.

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