• different coloured egg in a tray of eggs.
  • different coloured egg in a tray of eggs.
  • different coloured egg in a tray of eggs.
  • different coloured egg in a tray of eggs.
  • different coloured egg in a tray of eggs.
  • Single red apple amongst other mixed apples
  • yellow tomatoes amongst other mixed tomatoes
  • Single red apple amongst other mixed apples
  • Red plums amongst other mixed plums
  • Single individual green pea.
  • Individual coffee beans in a coffee cup. Stock Photo.
  • Single red sweet pepper amongst other mixed peppers
  • Single red apple amongst other mixed apples
  • One coloured egg in a tray of black & white eggs
  • Fresh Eggs
  • Fresh Eggs
  • Fresh Eggs
  • Close up of a stack egg trays stacked on top of each other. Brown eggs with one white duck egg. Individual.
  • Close up of a stack egg trays stacked on top of each other. Brown eggs with one white duck egg. Individual.
  • Fresh Eggs
  • Fresh Eggs
  • Fresh Eggs
  • wide shot of the Roman mosaics of the room of the Small Circus depicting Roman boys riding small chariots pulled by birds in a small circus, The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic know as the Small Circus at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene of a chariot race from the Circus Maximus in Rome. Two wheeled chariots, driven by children,  are racing around a central Pina (barrier) being drawn by fowl and web footed birds. The four chariots represent the four factions that raced against each other at the Circus and the tunics of the cild charioteers and the birds pulling their chariots are distinguished by the four different colours used by each faction.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the room of the Small Circus depicting Roman boys riding small chariots pulled by birds in a small circus, The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic know as the Small Circus at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene of a chariot race from the Circus Maximus in Rome. Two wheeled chariots, driven by children,  are racing around a central Pina (barrier) being drawn by fowl and web footed birds. The four chariots represent the four factions that raced against each other at the Circus and the tunics of the cild charioteers and the birds pulling their chariots are distinguished by the four different colours used by each faction.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the room of the Small Circus depicting Roman boys riding small chariots pulled by birds in a small circus, The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic know as the Small Circus at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene of a chariot race from the Circus Maximus in Rome. Two wheeled chariots, driven by children,  are racing around a central Pina (barrier) being drawn by fowl and web footed birds. The four chariots represent the four factions that raced against each other at the Circus and the tunics of the cild charioteers and the birds pulling their chariots are distinguished by the four different colours used by each faction.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the room of the Small Circus depicting Roman boys riding small chariots pulled by geese in a small circus, The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic know as the Small Circus at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene of a chariot race from the Circus Maximus in Rome. Two wheeled chariots, driven by children,  are racing around a central Pina (barrier) being drawn by fowl and web footed birds. The four chariots represent the four factions that raced against each other at the Circus and the tunics of the cild charioteers and the birds pulling their chariots are distinguished by the four different colours used by each faction.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the room of the Small Circus depicting Roman boys riding small chariots pulled by geese in a small circus, The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic know as the Small Circus at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene of a chariot race from the Circus Maximus in Rome. Two wheeled chariots, driven by children,  are racing around a central Pina (barrier) being drawn by fowl and web footed birds. The four chariots represent the four factions that raced against each other at the Circus and the tunics of the cild charioteers and the birds pulling their chariots are distinguished by the four different colours used by each faction.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the room of the Small Circus depicting Roman boys riding small chariots pulled by birds in a small circus, The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic know as the Small Circus at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene of a chariot race from the Circus Maximus in Rome. Two wheeled chariots, driven by children,  are racing around a central Pina (barrier) being drawn by fowl and web footed birds. The four chariots represent the four factions that raced against each other at the Circus and the tunics of the cild charioteers and the birds pulling their chariots are distinguished by the four different colours used by each faction.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the room of the Small Circus depicting Roman boys riding small chariots pulled by pigeons in a small circus, The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic know as the Small Circus at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene of a chariot race from the Circus Maximus in Rome. Two wheeled chariots, driven by children,  are racing around a central Pina (barrier) being drawn by fowl and web footed birds. The four chariots represent the four factions that raced against each other at the Circus and the tunics of the cild charioteers and the birds pulling their chariots are distinguished by the four different colours used by each faction.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the room of the Small Circus depicting Roman boys riding small chariots pulled by birds in a small circus, The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic know as the Small Circus at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene of a chariot race from the Circus Maximus in Rome. Two wheeled chariots, driven by children,  are racing around a central Pina (barrier) being drawn by fowl and web footed birds. The four chariots represent the four factions that raced against each other at the Circus and the tunics of the cild charioteers and the birds pulling their chariots are distinguished by the four different colours used by each faction.
  • Wide picture of the Roman mosaics of the room of the Small Circus depicting Roman boys riding small chariots pulled by birds in a small circus, The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic know as the Small Circus at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene of a chariot race from the Circus Maximus in Rome. Two wheeled chariots, driven by children,  are racing around a central Pina (barrier) being drawn by fowl and web footed birds. The four chariots represent the four factions that raced against each other at the Circus and the tunics of the cild charioteers and the birds pulling their chariots are distinguished by the four different colours used by each faction.
  • Wide picture of the Roman mosaics of the room of the Small Circus depicting Roman boys riding small chariots pulled by birds in a small circus, The Vestibule of The Smnall Circus, room no 41  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic know as the Small Circus at the Villa Romana del Casale depicts a scene of a chariot race from the Circus Maximus in Rome. Two wheeled chariots, driven by children,  are racing around a central Pina (barrier) being drawn by fowl and web footed birds. The four chariots represent the four factions that raced against each other at the Circus and the tunics of the cild charioteers and the birds pulling their chariots are distinguished by the four different colours used by each faction.
  • Upright picture of Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Jugglers and acrobats.  Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The juggler facing towards left, with long hair and a short dress, swallows a dagger; the smaller acrobats behind go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures have horned headdresses and earrings with a huge ring on their ears. It is thought that the acrobats are of different nationality, which is the reason why they are depicted smaller. <br />
<br />
 Against a white background.
  • Upright picture of Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Jugglers and acrobats.  Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The juggler facing towards left, with long hair and a short dress, swallows a dagger; the smaller acrobats behind go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures have horned headdresses and earrings with a huge ring on their ears. It is thought that the acrobats are of different nationality, which is the reason why they are depicted smaller. <br />
<br />
Against a brown gray background.
  • Upright picture of Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Jugglers and acrobats.  Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The juggler facing towards left, with long hair and a short dress, swallows a dagger; the smaller acrobats behind go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures have horned headdresses and earrings with a huge ring on their ears. It is thought that the acrobats are of different nationality, which is the reason why they are depicted smaller. <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Upright picture of Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Jugglers and acrobats.  Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The juggler facing towards left, with long hair and a short dress, swallows a dagger; the smaller acrobats behind go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures have horned headdresses and earrings with a huge ring on their ears. It is thought that the acrobats are of different nationality, which is the reason why they are depicted smaller. <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Landscape picture of Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Jugglers and acrobats.  Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The juggler facing towards left, with long hair and a short dress, swallows a dagger; the smaller acrobats behind go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures have horned headdresses and earrings with a huge ring on their ears. It is thought that the acrobats are of different nationality, which is the reason why they are depicted smaller.  <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Landscape picture of Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Jugglers and acrobats.  Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The juggler facing towards left, with long hair and a short dress, swallows a dagger; the smaller acrobats behind go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures have horned headdresses and earrings with a huge ring on their ears. It is thought that the acrobats are of different nationality, which is the reason why they are depicted smaller.<br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Landscape picture of Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Jugglers and acrobats.  Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The juggler facing towards left, with long hair and a short dress, swallows a dagger; the smaller acrobats behind go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures have horned headdresses and earrings with a huge ring on their ears. It is thought that the acrobats are of different nationality, which is the reason why they are depicted smaller. <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Landscape picture of Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Jugglers and acrobats.  Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The juggler facing towards left, with long hair and a short dress, swallows a dagger; the smaller acrobats behind go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures have horned headdresses and earrings with a huge ring on their ears. It is thought that the acrobats are of different nationality, which is the reason why they are depicted smaller. <br />
<br />
Against a brown gray background.
  • Landscape picture of Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Jugglers and acrobats.  Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The juggler facing towards left, with long hair and a short dress, swallows a dagger; the smaller acrobats behind go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures have horned headdresses and earrings with a huge ring on their ears. It is thought that the acrobats are of different nationality, which is the reason why they are depicted smaller. <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Upright picture of Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Jugglers and acrobats.  Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The juggler facing towards left, with long hair and a short dress, swallows a dagger; the smaller acrobats behind go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures have horned headdresses and earrings with a huge ring on their ears. It is thought that the acrobats are of different nationality, which is the reason why they are depicted smaller. <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century v Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century  Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. v
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additio-nal details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a grey art background.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Vestibule of a Rome Villa, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
A large fresco covered the curving wall of the vestibule E 5 was positioned at the entrance of the house onto the street. Vitruvius claims that the vestibulum was a room which was not needed by common people, but which was essential in a house worthy of respect, because it served to welcome guests and the people who came to be received by the owners of the house. The frescoed decoration of this wall, which was entirely detached, shows a division into panels, architectural perspectives and pavilions among which are figures and decorative elements, above a band of skirting. Numerous panels have been detached from the corridor E 3 E 11 which connected all the areas of the house, but it has not been possible to reconstruct the sequence of the walls. Inside the frames, against a white background, different decorative elements are arranged, along with hanging female and male figures, hippogriffs and other fantastical animals, vases, garlands and vegetation.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Vestibule of a Rome Villa, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
A large fresco covered the curving wall of the vestibule E 5 was positioned at the entrance of the house onto the street. Vitruvius claims that the vestibulum was a room which was not needed by common people, but which was essential in a house worthy of respect, because it served to welcome guests and the people who came to be received by the owners of the house. The frescoed decoration of this wall, which was entirely detached, shows a division into panels, architectural perspectives and pavilions among which are figures and decorative elements, above a band of skirting. Numerous panels have been detached from the corridor E 3 E 11 which connected all the areas of the house, but it has not been possible to reconstruct the sequence of the walls. Inside the frames, against a white background, different decorative elements are arranged, along with hanging female and male figures, hippogriffs and other fantastical animals, vases, garlands and vegetation.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Vestibule of a Rome Villa, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
A large fresco covered the curving wall of the vestibule E 5 was positioned at the entrance of the house onto the street. Vitruvius claims that the vestibulum was a room which was not needed by common people, but which was essential in a house worthy of respect, because it served to welcome guests and the people who came to be received by the owners of the house. The frescoed decoration of this wall, which was entirely detached, shows a division into panels, architectural perspectives and pavilions among which are figures and decorative elements, above a band of skirting. Numerous panels have been detached from the corridor E 3 E 11 which connected all the areas of the house, but it has not been possible to reconstruct the sequence of the walls. Inside the frames, against a white background, different decorative elements are arranged, along with hanging female and male figures, hippogriffs and other fantastical animals, vases, garlands and vegetation.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Vestibule of a Rome Villa, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
A large fresco covered the curving wall of the vestibule E 5 was positioned at the entrance of the house onto the street. Vitruvius claims that the vestibulum was a room which was not needed by common people, but which was essential in a house worthy of respect, because it served to welcome guests and the people who came to be received by the owners of the house. The frescoed decoration of this wall, which was entirely detached, shows a division into panels, architectural perspectives and pavilions among which are figures and decorative elements, above a band of skirting. Numerous panels have been detached from the corridor E 3 E 11 which connected all the areas of the house, but it has not been possible to reconstruct the sequence of the walls. Inside the frames, against a white background, different decorative elements are arranged, along with hanging female and male figures, hippogriffs and other fantastical animals, vases, garlands and vegetation.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Vestibule of a Rome Villa, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
A large fresco covered the curving wall of the vestibule E 5 was positioned at the entrance of the house onto the street. Vitruvius claims that the vestibulum was a room which was not needed by common people, but which was essential in a house worthy of respect, because it served to welcome guests and the people who came to be received by the owners of the house. The frescoed decoration of this wall, which was entirely detached, shows a division into panels, architectural perspectives and pavilions among which are figures and decorative elements, above a band of skirting. Numerous panels have been detached from the corridor E 3 E 11 which connected all the areas of the house, but it has not been possible to reconstruct the sequence of the walls. Inside the frames, against a white background, different decorative elements are arranged, along with hanging female and male figures, hippogriffs and other fantastical animals, vases, garlands and vegetation.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Bedroom E of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
Bedroom E, a private room with a bed (kline), was divided into antechamber and alcove. The room is probably a later reworking, as the doorway is off-center. The decoration of the walls, in contrast to cubicula B and D, is done in muted colors. Slender columns with a surreal superstructure frame aedicula with sacred landscapes. Three of these show travellers making a sacrifice to a herm of Athena. The images refer in various ways to the world of women. The little pictures along the walls of the antechamber show girls engaged in different activities. On the rear wall of the alcove, which has a picture with an amorous theme, the goddess Artemis is shown dressed as both huntress and moon goddess. Two Muses are on the opposite wall. The stucco decorations of the vaulted ceiling show idyllic landscapes with sacred elements and mythological scenes. In one, Phaethon asks his father Apollo to let him drive the chariot of the Sun. Other scenes show statues of Zeus, a statue probably representing Augustus as the new Mercury, disks of the sun, winged victories and grotesque figures, all done in very low relief with the elegance and delicacy of jewellery. The mosaic pavement of this room, known from a contemporary watercolor, had a pattern of squares and stars.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Bedroom E of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
Bedroom E, a private room with a bed (kline), was divided into antechamber and alcove. The room is probably a later reworking, as the doorway is off-center. The decoration of the walls, in contrast to cubicula B and D, is done in muted colors. Slender columns with a surreal superstructure frame aedicula with sacred landscapes. Three of these show travellers making a sacrifice to a herm of Athena. The images refer in various ways to the world of women. The little pictures along the walls of the antechamber show girls engaged in different activities. On the rear wall of the alcove, which has a picture with an amorous theme, the goddess Artemis is shown dressed as both huntress and moon goddess. Two Muses are on the opposite wall. The stucco decorations of the vaulted ceiling show idyllic landscapes with sacred elements and mythological scenes. In one, Phaethon asks his father Apollo to let him drive the chariot of the Sun. Other scenes show statues of Zeus, a statue probably representing Augustus as the new Mercury, disks of the sun, winged victories and grotesque figures, all done in very low relief with the elegance and delicacy of jewellery. The mosaic pavement of this room, known from a contemporary watercolor, had a pattern of squares and stars.
  • 8th Cent. B.C Babylonian limestone funereal stele with inscription & relief sculpture of the governor of Mari and Suhi praying to the Gods from the Palace Museum Babylon, Iraq. The inscription states that the governor reigned for 13 years and built the city of Gabarri-ibni also making canals for new date palm cultivation in different cities, and working on the development of agriculture in the city of Suhi. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 7815
  • 8th Cent. B.C Babylonian limestone funereal stele with inscription & relief sculpture of the governor of Mari and Suhi praying to the Gods from the Palace Museum Babylon, Iraq. The inscription states that the governor reigned for 13 years and built the city of Gabarri-ibni also making canals for new date palm cultivation in different cities, and working on the development of agriculture in the city of Suhi. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 7815
  • 8th Cent. B.C Babylonian limestone  stele with inscription & relief sculpture of the governor of Mari and Suhi praying to the Gods from the Palace Museum Babylon, Iraq. The inscription states that the governor reigned for 13 years and built the city of Gabarri-ibni also making canals for new date palm cultivation in different cities, and working on the development of agriculture in the city of Suhi. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 7815
  • 8th Cent. B.C Babylonian limestone funereal stele with inscription & relief sculpture of the governor of Mari and Suhi praying to the Gods from the Palace Museum Babylon, Iraq. The inscription states that the governor reigned for 13 years and built the city of Gabarri-ibni also making canals for new date palm cultivation in different cities, and working on the development of agriculture in the city of Suhi. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 7815
  • 8th Cent. B.C Babylonian limestone funereal stele with inscription & relief sculpture of the governor of Mari and Suhi praying to the Gods from the Palace Museum Babylon, Iraq. The inscription states that the governor reigned for 13 years and built the city of Gabarri-ibni also making canals for new date palm cultivation in different cities, and working on the development of agriculture in the city of Suhi. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 7815
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • The Medieval buildings of the Avenue of the Knights where there were 7 dfferent lodges for Knights speaking different languages. Rhodes, Greece, UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • The Medieval buildings of the Avenue of the Knights where there were 7 dfferent lodges for Knights speaking different languages. Rhodes, Greece, UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • The Medieval buildings of the Avenue of the Knights where there were 7 dfferent lodges for Knights speaking different languages. Rhodes, Greece, UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • The Medieval buildings of the Avenue of the Knights where there were 7 dfferent lodges for Knights speaking different languages. Rhodes, Greece, UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • The Medieval buildings of the Avenue of the Knights where there were 7 dfferent lodges for Knights speaking different languages. Rhodes, Greece, UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • Picture of Tomb  81 of North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Tomb 81 (2nd - 3rd centuries AD)<br />
The tomb is built on a high platform that compensates for <br />
difference in level of the land behind it. Inside the <br />
chamber are three sepulchre beds, arranged along the walls, an a very deep ossuary. On the roof slabs, which jut out a long way, are two sarcophagi. Two inscriptions beside the door end the inscription on the slab that closed it (now in the museum ) refer to the successive occupants, including Eutyches Pompeios, who left 100 denari to the association of wool washers for the periodic decoration of  <br />
the tomb.
  • Terra cotta ritual bull pots, probably of Hurri & Serri, the bulls of Teshup the Storm God. produced as pairs only differing in the direction of their tails, the spouts on their backs indicate that they were offering vessels- 16th century BC - Hattusa ( Bogazkoy ) - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey . Against white background
  • Terra cotta ritual bull pots, probably of Hurri & Serri, the bulls of Teshup the Storm God. produced as pairs only differing in the direction of their tails, the spouts on their backs indicate that they were offering vessels- 16th century BC - Hattusa ( Bogazkoy ) - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey . Against gray background
  • Terra cotta ritual bull pots, probably of Hurri & Serri, the bulls of Teshup the Storm God. produced as pairs only differing in the direction of their tails, the spouts on their backs indicate that they were offering vessels- 16th century BC - Hattusa ( Bogazkoy ) - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey . Against black background
  • Terra cotta ritual bull pots, probably of Hurri & Serri, the bulls of Teshup the Storm God. produced as pairs only differing in the direction of their tails, the spouts on their backs indicate that they were offering vessels- 16th century BC - Hattusa ( Bogazkoy ) - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey . Against grey art background
  • Terra cotta ritual bull pots, probably of Hurri & Serri, the bulls of Teshup the Storm God. produced as pairs only differing in the direction of their tails, the spouts on their backs indicate that they were offering vessels- 16th century BC - Hattusa ( Bogazkoy ) - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey
  • Terra cotta ritual bull pots, probably of Hurri & Serri, the bulls of Teshup the Storm God. produced as pairs only differing in the direction of their tails, the spouts on their backs indicate that they were offering vessels- 16th century BC - Hattusa ( Bogazkoy ) - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey . Against white background
  • Terra cotta ritual bull pots, probably of Hurri & Serri, the bulls of Teshup the Storm God. produced as pairs only differing in the direction of their tails, the spouts on their backs indicate that they were offering vessels- 16th century BC - Hattusa ( Bogazkoy ) - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey . Against black background
  • Terra cotta ritual bull pots, probably of Hurri & Serri, the bulls of Teshup the Storm God. produced as pairs only differing in the direction of their tails, the spouts on their backs indicate that they were offering vessels- 16th century BC - Hattusa ( Bogazkoy ) - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey
  • Terra cotta ritual bull pots, probably of Hurri & Serri, the bulls of Teshup the Storm God. produced as pairs only differing in the direction of their tails, the spouts on their backs indicate that they were offering vessels- 16th century BC - Hattusa ( Bogazkoy ) - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey
  • Terra cotta ritual bull pots, probably of Hurri & Serri, the bulls of Teshup the Storm God. produced as pairs only differing in the direction of their tails, the spouts on their backs indicate that they were offering vessels- 16th century BC - Hattusa ( Bogazkoy ) - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey . Against grey art background

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