• Car in the narrow streets of Cefalu [Cefaú] Sicily
  • 4 x4 Landrover Defnder on the Sahara sand dunes of erg Chebbi, Morocco, Africa
  • Hunter driving deer into a net from the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world, circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat with a chariot Releif sculpture from Karkamis,, Turkey. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. The Chariot is pulled by horses with plumed headresses. One man os about to shoot an arrow from his bow, the other man is driving the cahriot. Below the horse is a man dying. 5
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat with a chariot Releif sculpture from Karkamis,, Turkey.Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. The Cahiot is pulled by horses with plumed headresses. One man os about to shoot an arrow from his bow, the other man is driving the cahriot. Below the horse is a man dying. 4
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat with a chariot Releif sculpture from Karkamis,, Turkey. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. The Cahiot is pulled by horses with plumed headresses. One man os about to shoot an arrow from his bow, the other man is driving the cahriot. Below the horse is a man dying. 2
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat with a chariot Releif sculpture from Karkamis,, Turkey. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. The Cahiot is pulled by horses with plumed headresses. One man os about to shoot an arrow from his bow, the other man is driving the cahriot. Below the horse is a man dying. 1
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat with a chariot Releif sculpture from Karkamis,, Turkey. Ancora Archaeological Museum. The Cahiot is pulled by horses with plumed headresses. One man os about to shoot an arrow from his bow, the other man is driving the cahriot. Below the horse is a man dying.
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat with a chariot Releif sculpture from Karkamis,, Turkey. Ancora Archaeological Museum. The Cahiot is pulled by horses with plumed headresses. One man os about to shoot an arrow from his bow, the other man is driving the cahriot. Below the horse is a animal cowering. 5
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat with a chariot Releif sculpture from Karkamis,, Turkey. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. The Cahiot is pulled by horses with plumed headresses. One man os about to shoot an arrow from his bow, the other man is driving the cahriot. Below the horse is a animal cowering. 6
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat with a chariot Releif sculpture from Karkamis,, Turkey. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. The Cahiot is pulled by horses with plumed headresses. One man os about to shoot an arrow from his bow, the other man is driving the cahriot. Below the horse is a animal cowering. 4
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat with a chariot Releif sculpture from Karkamis,, Turkey. Ancora Archaeological Museum. The Cahiot is pulled by horses with plumed headresses. One man os about to shoot an arrow from his bow, the other man is driving the cahriot. Below the horse is a animal cowering. 3
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat with a chariot Releif sculpture from Karkamis,, Turkey.Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. The Cahiot is pulled by horses with plumed headresses. One man os about to shoot an arrow from his bow, the other man is driving the cahriot. Below the horse is a animal cowering. 2
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat with a chariot Releif sculpture from Karkamis,, Turkey. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. The Cahiot is pulled by horses with plumed headresses. One man os about to shoot an arrow from his bow, the other man is driving the cahriot. Below the horse is a animal cowering.
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat with a chariot Releif sculpture from Karkamis,, Turkey.  The Cahiot is pulled by horses with plumed headresses. One man os about to shoot an arrow from his bow, the other man is driving the cahriot. Below the horse is a man dying. An Ankara Museum of Anatolian Civilizations exhibit.
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat with a chariot Releif sculpture from Karkamis,, Turkey.  The Chariot is pulled by horses with plumed headresses. One man os about to shoot an arrow from his bow, the other man is driving the cahriot. Below the horse is a animal cowering. An Ankara Museum of Anatolian Civilizations exhibit.
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat with a chariot Releif sculpture from Karkamis,, Turkey.  The Cahiot is pulled by horses with plumed headresses. One man os about to shoot an arrow from his bow, the other man is driving the cahriot. Below the horse is a animal cowering. An Ankara Museum of Anatolian Civilizations exhibit.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Bedroom E of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
Bedroom E, a private room with a bed (kline), was divided into antechamber and alcove. The room is probably a later reworking, as the doorway is off-center. The decoration of the walls, in contrast to cubicula B and D, is done in muted colors. Slender columns with a surreal superstructure frame aedicula with sacred landscapes. Three of these show travellers making a sacrifice to a herm of Athena. The images refer in various ways to the world of women. The little pictures along the walls of the antechamber show girls engaged in different activities. On the rear wall of the alcove, which has a picture with an amorous theme, the goddess Artemis is shown dressed as both huntress and moon goddess. Two Muses are on the opposite wall. The stucco decorations of the vaulted ceiling show idyllic landscapes with sacred elements and mythological scenes. In one, Phaethon asks his father Apollo to let him drive the chariot of the Sun. Other scenes show statues of Zeus, a statue probably representing Augustus as the new Mercury, disks of the sun, winged victories and grotesque figures, all done in very low relief with the elegance and delicacy of jewellery. The mosaic pavement of this room, known from a contemporary watercolor, had a pattern of squares and stars.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Bedroom E of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
Bedroom E, a private room with a bed (kline), was divided into antechamber and alcove. The room is probably a later reworking, as the doorway is off-center. The decoration of the walls, in contrast to cubicula B and D, is done in muted colors. Slender columns with a surreal superstructure frame aedicula with sacred landscapes. Three of these show travellers making a sacrifice to a herm of Athena. The images refer in various ways to the world of women. The little pictures along the walls of the antechamber show girls engaged in different activities. On the rear wall of the alcove, which has a picture with an amorous theme, the goddess Artemis is shown dressed as both huntress and moon goddess. Two Muses are on the opposite wall. The stucco decorations of the vaulted ceiling show idyllic landscapes with sacred elements and mythological scenes. In one, Phaethon asks his father Apollo to let him drive the chariot of the Sun. Other scenes show statues of Zeus, a statue probably representing Augustus as the new Mercury, disks of the sun, winged victories and grotesque figures, all done in very low relief with the elegance and delicacy of jewellery. The mosaic pavement of this room, known from a contemporary watercolor, had a pattern of squares and stars.
  • Roman statue of Selene. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/201. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. <br />
<br />
Selene is the goddess of the moon. She is the daughter of the Titans Hyperion and Theia; and sister of the sun-god Helios; and Eos; goddess of the dawn. She drives her moon chariot across the heavens.
  • Roman statue of Selene. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/201. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Selene is the goddess of the moon. She is the daughter of the Titans Hyperion and Theia; and sister of the sun-god Helios; and Eos; goddess of the dawn. She drives her moon chariot across the heavens.
  • Roman statue of Selene. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/201. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Selene is the goddess of the moon. She is the daughter of the Titans Hyperion and Theia; and sister of the sun-god Helios; and Eos; goddess of the dawn. She drives her moon chariot across the heavens.
  • Roman statue of Selene. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/201. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Selene is the goddess of the moon. She is the daughter of the Titans Hyperion and Theia; and sister of the sun-god Helios; and Eos; goddess of the dawn. She drives her moon chariot across the heavens.
  • Roman statue of Selene. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/201. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Selene is the goddess of the moon. She is the daughter of the Titans Hyperion and Theia; and sister of the sun-god Helios; and Eos; goddess of the dawn. She drives her moon chariot across the heavens.

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