• Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Ripe wheat (corn) in a filed ready to harvest
  • Ripe wheat (corn) in a filed ready to harvest
  • Ripe wheat (corn) in a filed ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Ripe wheat (corn) in a filed ready to harvest
  • Ripe wheat (corn) in a filed ready to harvest
  • Ripe wheat (corn) in a filed ready to harvest
  • Ripe wheat (corn) in a filed ready to harvest
  • wheat field ready to be harvested
  • wheat field ready to be harvested
  • wheat field ready to be harvested
  • wheat field ready to be harvested
  • wheat field ready to be harvested
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Two bull-men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull-like ears and legs have human bodies. <br />
<br />
On a white background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Water Gate. Basalt, 900 - 700 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum. Ankara. Turkey.<br />
<br />
Fragment of Two bull men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull like ears and legs have human bodies.<br />
<br />
On a gray background.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Two bull-men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull-like ears and legs have human bodies. <br />
<br />
On a brown art background.
  • Landscape picture of Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Jugglers and acrobats.  Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The juggler facing towards left, with long hair and a short dress, swallows a dagger; the smaller acrobats behind go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures have horned headdresses and earrings with a huge ring on their ears. It is thought that the acrobats are of different nationality, which is the reason why they are depicted smaller.  <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Landscape picture of Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Jugglers and acrobats.  Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The juggler facing towards left, with long hair and a short dress, swallows a dagger; the smaller acrobats behind go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures have horned headdresses and earrings with a huge ring on their ears. It is thought that the acrobats are of different nationality, which is the reason why they are depicted smaller. <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Landscape picture of Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Jugglers and acrobats.  Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The juggler facing towards left, with long hair and a short dress, swallows a dagger; the smaller acrobats behind go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures have horned headdresses and earrings with a huge ring on their ears. It is thought that the acrobats are of different nationality, which is the reason why they are depicted smaller. <br />
<br />
Against a brown gray background.
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 21 - sculpture of an animal with a long snout and pointed ears. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 21 - sculpture of an animal with a long snout and pointed ears. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 29  -  sculpture of.a creature with a rounded head, pointed ears and a beaked nose. In its huge mouth it is biting on a rod . The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 29  -  sculpture of.a creature with a rounded head, pointed ears and a beaked nose. In its huge mouth it is biting on a rod . The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 21 - sculpture of an animal with a long snout and pointed ears. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 29  -  sculpture of.a creature with a rounded head, pointed ears and a beaked nose. In its huge mouth it is biting on a rod . The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 29  -  sculpture of.a creature with a rounded head, pointed ears and a beaked nose. In its huge mouth it is biting on a rod . The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Sculpture of Lapiths and  Centaurs battling from the Metope of the Parthenon on the Acropolis of Athens no XXIX. Also known as the Elgin marbles. British Museum London. A Centaur with pointed ears is carrying off a virgin.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion releif sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion releif sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion releif sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Water Gate. Basalt, 900 - 700 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum. Ankara. Turkey.<br />
<br />
Fragment of Two bull men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull like ears and legs have human bodies. <br />
<br />
On a white background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Water Gate. Basalt, 900 - 700 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum. Ankara. Turkey.<br />
<br />
Fragment of Two bull men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull like ears and legs have human bodies. <br />
<br />
On a black background.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Water Gate. Basalt, 900 - 700 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum. Ankara. Turkey.<br />
<br />
Fragment of Two bull men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull like ears and legs have human bodies. <br />
<br />
On a brown art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Water Gate. Basalt, 900 - 700 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum. Ankara. Turkey.<br />
<br />
Fragment of Two bull men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull like ears and legs have human bodies. <br />
<br />
On a grey art background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Two bull-men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull-like ears and legs have human bodies. <br />
<br />
On a gray background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Two bull-men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull-like ears and legs have human bodies. <br />
<br />
On a black background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Two bull-men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull-like ears and legs have human bodies. <br />
<br />
On a grey art background.
  • Upright picture of Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Jugglers and acrobats.  Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The juggler facing towards left, with long hair and a short dress, swallows a dagger; the smaller acrobats behind go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures have horned headdresses and earrings with a huge ring on their ears. It is thought that the acrobats are of different nationality, which is the reason why they are depicted smaller. <br />
<br />
 Against a white background.
  • Upright picture of Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Jugglers and acrobats.  Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The juggler facing towards left, with long hair and a short dress, swallows a dagger; the smaller acrobats behind go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures have horned headdresses and earrings with a huge ring on their ears. It is thought that the acrobats are of different nationality, which is the reason why they are depicted smaller. <br />
<br />
Against a brown gray background.
  • Upright picture of Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Jugglers and acrobats.  Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The juggler facing towards left, with long hair and a short dress, swallows a dagger; the smaller acrobats behind go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures have horned headdresses and earrings with a huge ring on their ears. It is thought that the acrobats are of different nationality, which is the reason why they are depicted smaller. <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Upright picture of Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Jugglers and acrobats.  Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The juggler facing towards left, with long hair and a short dress, swallows a dagger; the smaller acrobats behind go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures have horned headdresses and earrings with a huge ring on their ears. It is thought that the acrobats are of different nationality, which is the reason why they are depicted smaller. <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Landscape picture of Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Jugglers and acrobats.  Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The juggler facing towards left, with long hair and a short dress, swallows a dagger; the smaller acrobats behind go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures have horned headdresses and earrings with a huge ring on their ears. It is thought that the acrobats are of different nationality, which is the reason why they are depicted smaller.<br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Landscape picture of Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Jugglers and acrobats.  Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The juggler facing towards left, with long hair and a short dress, swallows a dagger; the smaller acrobats behind go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures have horned headdresses and earrings with a huge ring on their ears. It is thought that the acrobats are of different nationality, which is the reason why they are depicted smaller. <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Upright picture of Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Jugglers and acrobats.  Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The juggler facing towards left, with long hair and a short dress, swallows a dagger; the smaller acrobats behind go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures have horned headdresses and earrings with a huge ring on their ears. It is thought that the acrobats are of different nationality, which is the reason why they are depicted smaller. <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Sculpture of Lapiths and  Centaurs battling from the Metope of the Parthenon on the Acropolis of Athens no XXIX. Also known as the Elgin marbles. British Museum London. A Centaur with pointed ears is carrying off a virgin.
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 21 - sculpture of an animal with a long snout and pointed ears. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Sculpture of Lapiths and  Centaurs battling from the Metope of the Parthenon on the Acropolis of Athens no XXIX. Also known as the Elgin marbles. British Museum London. A Centaur with pointed ears is carrying off a virgin.
  • Sculpture of Lapiths and  Centaurs battling from the Metope of the Parthenon on the Acropolis of Athens no XXIX. Also known as the Elgin marbles. British Museum London. A Centaur with pointed ears is carrying off a virgin.
  • Sculpture of Lapiths and  Centaurs battling from the Metope of the Parthenon on the Acropolis of Athens no XXIX. Also known as the Elgin marbles. British Museum London. A Centaur with pointed ears is carrying off a virgin.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Close up of a RomanSebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Roman mosaics - Seasons  Mosaic. Telete Villa.  2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Seasons mosaic Telete, was unearthed during the rescue excavations y Gaziantep Museum in 1994 when it was about to be stolen by the traffickers. It is the floor mosaic of a villa terrace located on the western skins of Zeugma hill <br />
<br />
The pane% consists of nine parts. At the central panel, Eros, who Is a mythological character and who has a crown on his head, sits side by side with Telete, the daughter of Dionysus. This representation symbolises the preparation of a young woman who is just about to taste the love and to become mature. There are busts of seasonal gods In the square panels at the corners. The crowned head of the Spring Goddess Ear Is slightly towards right. She wears a floral necklace. Her righr shoulder is naked and the crimps of her cloak are seen on her left shoulder. There is the bust of the river god on the top-right of the Telete panel. A kid lying on the grass and a bucket are pictured in the lower rectangular panel. In the western-side rectangular panel, on the other hand, there are four fish going in and out of a game basket. There is a rabbit figure within the rectangular panel on the right. Mythical narrations and natural life are intertwined in this mosaic.
  • Roman mosaics - Seasons  Mosaic. Telete Villa.  2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Seasons mosaic Telete, was unearthed during the rescue excavations y Gaziantep Museum in 1994 when it was about to be stolen by the traffickers. It is the floor mosaic of a villa terrace located on the western skins of Zeugma hill <br />
<br />
The pane% consists of nine parts. At the central panel, Eros, who Is a mythological character and who has a crown on his head, sits side by side with Telete, the daughter of Dionysus. This representation symbolises the preparation of a young woman who is just about to taste the love and to become mature. There are busts of seasonal gods In the square panels at the corners. The crowned head of the Spring Goddess Ear Is slightly towards right. She wears a floral necklace. Her righr shoulder is naked and the crimps of her cloak are seen on her left shoulder. There is the bust of the river god on the top-right of the Telete panel. A kid lying on the grass and a bucket are pictured in the lower rectangular panel. In the western-side rectangular panel, on the other hand, there are four fish going in and out of a game basket. There is a rabbit figure within the rectangular panel on the right. Mythical narrations and natural life are intertwined in this mosaic.
  • Roman mosaics - Seasons  Mosaic. Telete Villa.  2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Seasons mosaic Telete, was unearthed during the rescue excavations y Gaziantep Museum in 1994 when it was about to be stolen by the traffickers. It is the floor mosaic of a villa terrace located on the western skins of Zeugma hill <br />
<br />
The pane% consists of nine parts. At the central panel, Eros, who Is a mythological character and who has a crown on his head, sits side by side with Telete, the daughter of Dionysus. This representation symbolises the preparation of a young woman who is just about to taste the love and to become mature. There are busts of seasonal gods In the square panels at the corners. The crowned head of the Spring Goddess Ear Is slightly towards right. She wears a floral necklace. Her righr shoulder is naked and the crimps of her cloak are seen on her left shoulder. There is the bust of the river god on the top-right of the Telete panel. A kid lying on the grass and a bucket are pictured in the lower rectangular panel. In the western-side rectangular panel, on the other hand, there are four fish going in and out of a game basket. There is a rabbit figure within the rectangular panel on the right. Mythical narrations and natural life are intertwined in this mosaic.
  • Roman mosaics - Seasons  Mosaic. Telete Villa.  2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Seasons mosaic Telete, was unearthed during the rescue excavations y Gaziantep Museum in 1994 when it was about to be stolen by the traffickers. It is the floor mosaic of a villa terrace located on the western skins of Zeugma hill <br />
<br />
The pane% consists of nine parts. At the central panel, Eros, who Is a mythological character and who has a crown on his head, sits side by side with Telete, the daughter of Dionysus. This representation symbolises the preparation of a young woman who is just about to taste the love and to become mature. There are busts of seasonal gods In the square panels at the corners. The crowned head of the Spring Goddess Ear Is slightly towards right. She wears a floral necklace. Her righr shoulder is naked and the crimps of her cloak are seen on her left shoulder. There is the bust of the river god on the top-right of the Telete panel. A kid lying on the grass and a bucket are pictured in the lower rectangular panel. In the western-side rectangular panel, on the other hand, there are four fish going in and out of a game basket. There is a rabbit figure within the rectangular panel on the right. Mythical narrations and natural life are intertwined in this mosaic.
  • Roman mosaics - Seasons  Mosaic. Telete Villa.  2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Seasons mosaic Telete, was unearthed during the rescue excavations y Gaziantep Museum in 1994 when it was about to be stolen by the traffickers. It is the floor mosaic of a villa terrace located on the western skins of Zeugma hill <br />
<br />
The pane% consists of nine parts. At the central panel, Eros, who Is a mythological character and who has a crown on his head, sits side by side with Telete, the daughter of Dionysus. This representation symbolises the preparation of a young woman who is just about to taste the love and to become mature. There are busts of seasonal gods In the square panels at the corners. The crowned head of the Spring Goddess Ear Is slightly towards right. She wears a floral necklace. Her righr shoulder is naked and the crimps of her cloak are seen on her left shoulder. There is the bust of the river god on the top-right of the Telete panel. A kid lying on the grass and a bucket are pictured in the lower rectangular panel. In the western-side rectangular panel, on the other hand, there are four fish going in and out of a game basket. There is a rabbit figure within the rectangular panel on the right. Mythical narrations and natural life are intertwined in this mosaic.
  • Gothic altarpiece dedicated to St Vincent by Bernat Martorell circa 1483-1440 in Barcelona, tempera and gold lef on wood from the Parish church of St Vincent of menarguens, Noguera, Spain. At the top of the central panels of the altar tryptic, replacing the traditional Calvery scene, can be seen in the centre the Virgin of Mercy and kneeling to the left is Sant Benet de Bages, in black, and to the right St. Bernard of Clairvaux, patron saint of thr Benedictine and Cistercian orders . Below this is a depiction of St Vincent and either side are scenes of the Mardom of Vincent. Along the bottom are scenes from the Passion of Christ, with Judas in a yellow tunic kissing Christ and a furious Peter cutting off the ear of Malcus. National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain, inv 15797. Against a white background.
  • Gothic altarpiece dedicated to St Vincent by Bernat Martorell circa 1483-1440 in Barcelona, tempera and gold lef on wood from the Parish church of St Vincent of menarguens, Noguera, Spain. At the top of the central panels of the altar tryptic, replacing the traditional Calvery scene, can be seen in the centre the Virgin of Mercy and kneeling to the left is Sant Benet de Bages, in black, and to the right St. Bernard of Clairvaux, patron saint of thr Benedictine and Cistercian orders . Below this is a depiction of St Vincent and either side are scenes of the Mardom of Vincent. Along the bottom are scenes from the Passion of Christ, with Judas in a yellow tunic kissing Christ and a furious Peter cutting off the ear of Malcus. National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain, inv 15797. Against a black background.
  • Gothic altarpiece dedicated to St Vincent by Bernat Martorell circa 1483-1440 in Barcelona, tempera and gold lef on wood from the Parish church of St Vincent of menarguens, Noguera, Spain. At the top of the central panels of the altar tryptic, replacing the traditional Calvery scene, can be seen in the centre the Virgin of Mercy and kneeling to the left is Sant Benet de Bages, in black, and to the right St. Bernard of Clairvaux, patron saint of thr Benedictine and Cistercian orders . Below this is a depiction of St Vincent and either side are scenes of the Mardom of Vincent. Along the bottom are scenes from the Passion of Christ, with Judas in a yellow tunic kissing Christ and a furious Peter cutting off the ear of Malcus. National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain, inv 15797
  • Gothic altarpiece dedicated to St Vincent by Bernat Martorell circa 1483-1440 in Barcelona, tempera and gold lef on wood from the Parish church of St Vincent of menarguens, Noguera, Spain. At the top of the central panels of the altar tryptic, replacing the traditional Calvery scene, can be seen in the centre the Virgin of Mercy and kneeling to the left is Sant Benet de Bages, in black, and to the right St. Bernard of Clairvaux, patron saint of thr Benedictine and Cistercian orders . Below this is a depiction of St Vincent and either side are scenes of the Mardom of Vincent. Along the bottom are scenes from the Passion of Christ, with Judas in a yellow tunic kissing Christ and a furious Peter cutting off the ear of Malcus. National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain, inv 15797. Against a art background.
  • Gothic altarpiece dedicated to St Vincent by Bernat Martorell circa 1483-1440 in Barcelona, tempera and gold lef on wood from the Parish church of St Vincent of menarguens, Noguera, Spain. At the top of the central panels of the altar tryptic, replacing the traditional Calvery scene, can be seen in the centre the Virgin of Mercy and kneeling to the left is Sant Benet de Bages, in black, and to the right St. Bernard of Clairvaux, patron saint of thr Benedictine and Cistercian orders . Below this is a depiction of St Vincent and either side are scenes of the Mardom of Vincent. Along the bottom are scenes from the Passion of Christ, with Judas in a yellow tunic kissing Christ and a furious Peter cutting off the ear of Malcus. National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain, inv 15797, Against a grey art background.
  • Gothic altarpiece dedicated to St Vincent by Bernat Martorell circa 1483-1440 in Barcelona, tempera and gold leaf on wood from the Parish church of St Vincent of menarguens, Noguera, Spain. At the top of the central panels of the altar tryptic, replacing the traditional Calvary scene, can be seen in the centre the Virgin of Mercy and kneeling to the left is Sant Benet de Bages, in black, and to the right St. Bernard of Clairvaux, patron saint of thr Benedictine and Cistercian orders . Below this is a depiction of St Vincent and either side are scenes of the Mardom of Vincent. Along the bottom are scenes from the Passion of Christ, with Judas in a yellow tunic kissing Christ and a furious Peter cutting off the ear of Malcus. National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain, inv 15797
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat showing a Conjurer & acrobats from Alacahöyük, Alaca Çorum Province, Turkey. Ancora Archaeological Museum.  The conjurer on the left has long hair and is swallowing a dagger whilst the acrobats go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures are wearing horned headress and large looped earings. The acrobats are thought to be foreigners which is why they are smaller than the conjurer. Old Bronze age Chalcolithic Period. 5
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat showing a Conjurer & acrobats from Alacahöyük, Alaca Çorum Province, Turkey. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara.  The conjurer on the left has long hair and is swallowing a dagger whilst the acrobats go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures are wearing horned headress and large looped earings. The acrobats are thought to be foreigners which is why they are smaller than the conjurer. Old Bronze age Chalcolithic Period.
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat showing a Conjurer & acrobats from Alacahöyük, Alaca Çorum Province, Turkey. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara.  The conjurer on the left has long hair and is swallowing a dagger whilst the acrobats go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures are wearing horned headress and large looped earings. The acrobats are thought to be foreigners which is why they are smaller than the conjurer. Old Bronze age Chalcolithic Period. 3
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat showing a Conjurer & acrobats from Alacahöyük, Alaca Çorum Province, Turkey. Ancora Archaeological Museum.  The conjurer on the left has long hair and is swallowing a dagger whilst the acrobats go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures are wearing horned headress and large looped earings. The acrobats are thought to be foreigners which is why they are smaller than the conjurer. Old Bronze age Chalcolithic Period. 2
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat showing a Conjurer & acrobats from Alacahöyük, Alaca Çorum Province, Turkey. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara.  The conjurer on the left has long hair and is swallowing a dagger whilst the acrobats go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures are wearing horned headress and large looped earings. The acrobats are thought to be foreigners which is why they are smaller than the conjurer. Old Bronze age Chalcolithic Period.
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat showing a Conjurer & acrobats from Alacahöyük, Alaca Çorum Province, Turkey.  The conjurer on the left has long hair and is swallowing a dagger whilst the acrobats go up the stairs without holding on. All the figures are wearing horned headress and large looped earings. The acrobats are thought to be foreigners which is why they are smaller than the conjurer. Old Bronze age Chalcolithic Period. An Ankara Museum of Anatolian Civilizations exhibit.

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