• The Corintian columns of Capitoline Temple dedicated to the three chief divinities of the Roman state, Jupiter, Juno and Minerva.  Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • The Corintian columns of Capitoline Temple dedicated to the three chief divinities of the Roman state, Jupiter, Juno and Minerva.  Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • The Corintian columns of Capitoline Temple dedicated to the three chief divinities of the Roman state, Jupiter, Juno and Minerva.  Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Roman mosaic of a hunter. Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Latin Inscription on a Roman stone. Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • The Arch of Caracalla, built in 217 by the city's governor, Marcus Aurelius Sebastenus, to honour the emperor Caracalla and his mother Julia Domna.Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • The Arch of Caracalla, built in 217 by the city's governor, Marcus Aurelius Sebastenus, to honour the emperor Caracalla and his mother Julia Domna.Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • The Corintian columns of Capitoline Temple dedicated to the three chief divinities of the Roman state, Jupiter, Juno and Minerva.  Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Exterior of the Basilica at Volubilis.  Completed during the reign of Macrinus in the early 3rd century, it is one of the finest Roman basilicas in Africa and is probably modelled on the one at Leptis Magna in Libya, Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Exterior of the Basilica at Volubilis.  Completed during the reign of Macrinus in the early 3rd century, it is one of the finest Roman basilicas in Africa and is probably modelled on the one at Leptis Magna in Libya, Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • The Corintian columns of Capitoline Temple dedicated to the three chief divinities of the Roman state, Jupiter, Juno and Minerva.  Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Tiwsted Corintian Roman column and capital. Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • The Corintian columns of Capitoline Temple dedicated to the three chief divinities of the Roman state, Jupiter, Juno and Minerva.  Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Exterior of the Basilica at Volubilis.  Completed during the reign of Macrinus in the early 3rd century, it is one of the finest Roman basilicas in Africa and is probably modelled on the one at Leptis Magna in Libya, Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Exterior of the Basilica at Volubilis.  Completed during the reign of Macrinus in the early 3rd century, it is one of the finest Roman basilicas in Africa and is probably modelled on the one at Leptis Magna in Libya, Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Exterior of the Basilica at Volubilis.  Completed during the reign of Macrinus in the early 3rd century, it is one of the finest Roman basilicas in Africa and is probably modelled on the one at Leptis Magna in Libya, Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Geometric designed Roman floor mosaic. Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Roman mosaic of a fish. Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Roman Mosaics of Bacchus encountering the sleeping Ariadne from the House of the Ephebe.  Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Roman mosaics of Dolphins, a Roman good luck symbol from The House of Orpheus. Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Roman Mosaics of Bacchus encountering the sleeping Ariadne from the House of the Ephebe.  Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Roman mosaic from The House of Orpheus showing Orpheus playing a lute in the centre with wild African animals surrounding him. From the triclinium or the dining room of the villa. Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Roman mosaic from The House of Orpheus showing Orpheus playing a lute in the centre with wild African animals surrounding him. From the triclinium or the dining room of the villa. Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Roman mosaic from The House of Orpheus showing Orpheus playing a lute in the centre with wild African animals surrounding him. From the triclinium or the dining room of the villa. Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • The Corintian columns of Capitoline Temple dedicated to the three chief divinities of the Roman state, Jupiter, Juno and Minerva.  Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Latin Inscription on a Roman stone. Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Exterior of the Basilica at Volubilis.  Completed during the reign of Macrinus in the early 3rd century, it is one of the finest Roman basilicas in Africa and is probably modelled on the one at Leptis Magna in Libya, Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Roman mosaic from The House of Orpheus showing Orpheus playing a lute in the centre with wild African animals surrounding him. From the triclinium or the dining room of the villa. Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • The Arch of Caracalla, built in 217 by the city's governor, Marcus Aurelius Sebastenus, to honour the emperor Caracalla and his mother Julia Domna.Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Latin Inscription on a Roman stone. Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • The Corintian columns of Capitoline Temple dedicated to the three chief divinities of the Roman state, Jupiter, Juno and Minerva.  Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • The Corintian columns of Capitoline Temple dedicated to the three chief divinities of the Roman state, Jupiter, Juno and Minerva.  Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Exterior of the Basilica at Volubilis.  Completed during the reign of Macrinus in the early 3rd century, it is one of the finest Roman basilicas in Africa and is probably modelled on the one at Leptis Magna in Libya, Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • Roman mosaic in the House of the Athlete or Desultor, located near the forum, contains a humorous mosaic of an athlete or acrobat riding a donkey back to front while holding a cup in his outstretched hand. It may possibly represent Silenus also known as the wine God Dionysus or Bacchus. Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • Structure 8 of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • Structure 8 of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • The recessed box beds and harth of one of the 8 houses of the Neolithic Barnhouse Settlement archaeological site, circa 3000 BC,  Loch of Harray, Orkney Mainland, Scotland,
  • Excavations of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Excavations of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Excavations of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ramp and entrance of the Scaean Gate Troy II 2600 - 2250 B.C, excavated by Schleimann and described by him  as the entrance to sacred site of Ilios described by Homer . Troy archaeological site, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Turkey
  • Excavations of Troy . Troy archaeological site, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Turkey
  • Part of the Schliemann Trench excavated from 1871 with remains of the original walls and Bronze age house walls of Troy from the Early Troia I Period, c. 2920 B.C. Troy archaeological site, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Turkey
  • Part of the Schliemann Trench excavated from 1871 with remains of the original walls and Bronze age house walls of Troy from the Early Troia I Period, c. 2920 B.C. Troy archaeological site, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Turkey
  • Excavations of Troy . Troy archaeological site, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Turkey
  • Early Christian Byzantine Basin with Crosses in the Byzantine shop area next to the gymnasium of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Main hall of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls. The Greco Roman Bath Gymnasium stands behind.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Main hall of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls. The Greco Roman Bath Gymnasium stands behind.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric wall mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Corinthian columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Corinthian columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Corinthian columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Portico & Ionic columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Portico & Ionic columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Forecourt of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric wall mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic  columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Portico & Ionic columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Architectural detail of The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Architectural detail of The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Early Christian Byzantine Basin with Crosses in the Byzantine shop area next to the gymnasium of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Forecourt of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Early Christian Byzantine Basin with Crosses in the Byzantine shop area next to the gymnasium of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD eagle decorated column base of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric wall mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Architectural detail of The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Portico & Ionic columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Roman Frescos of Pompei arhaeological site.
  • Roman Frescos of Pompei arhaeological site.
  • Roman Frescos of Pompei arhaeological site.
  • Roman Temple of Apollo  Pompeii archaeological site, Italy
  • Well in the street of Pompeii archaeological site.
  • Street of Pompeii archaeological site.
  • Street of Pompeii archaeological site.
  • Cobbled street of Pompeii archaeological site.
  • Cobbled street of Pompeii archaeological site.
  • Cobbled street of Pompeii archaeological site.
  • The Roman Corinthian Porticus, columns & tables of the money changers at the entrance of the Macellum in the Forum of Pompeii archaeological site, Italy.
  • The Roman Corinthian Porticus, columns & tables of the money changers at the entrance of the Macellum in the Forum of Pompeii archaeological site, Italy.
  • The Roman Corinthian Porticus, columns & tables of the money changers at the entrance of the Macellum in the Forum of Pompeii archaeological site, Italy.
  • Roman Temple of Apollo  Pompeii archaeological site, Italy
  • Cobbled street of Pompeii archaeological site.
  • The Roman Corinthian Porticus, columns & tables of the money changers at the entrance of the Macellum in the Forum of Pompeii archaeological site, Italy.
  • The Roman Corinthian Porticus, columns & tables of the money changers at the entrance of the Macellum in the Forum of Pompeii archaeological site, Italy.
  • Ramp and entrance of the Scaean Gate Troy II 2600 - 2250 B.C, excavated by Schleimann and described by him  as the entrance to sacred site of Ilios described by Homer . Troy archaeological site, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Turkey
  • Excavations of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Excavations of Troy . Troy archaeological site, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Turkey
  • Excavations of Troy . Troy archaeological site, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Turkey
  • Part of the Schliemann Trench excavated from 1871 with remains of the original walls and Bronze age house walls of Troy from the Early Troia I Period, c. 2920 B.C. Troy archaeological site, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Turkey
  • Part of the Schliemann Trench excavated from 1871 with remains of the original walls and Bronze age house walls of Troy from the Early Troia I Period, c. 2920 B.C. Troy archaeological site, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Turkey
  • Protective roof constructed to protect the south excavation area, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Protective roof constructed to protect the north excavation area, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, of scenmatic men and weapons carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 11" excavated in 2000 from cut 35  of the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. Black Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, of scenmatic men and weapons carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 11" excavated in 2000 from cut 35  of the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. white Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 4" excavated in 1984 from the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. White Background
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, of a deer carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC. Stele "Cemmo 16" excavated in 2000-13 from the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy.
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, of schematic figures carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC. Stele "Cemmo 16" excavated in 2000-13 from the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy.
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, of scenmatic men and weapons carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 11" excavated in 2000 from cut 35  of the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. Art Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, of scenmatic men and weapons carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 11" excavated in 2000 from cut 35  of the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. Black Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, of scenmatic men and weapons carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 11" excavated in 2000 from cut 35  of the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy.
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, of scenmatic men and weapons carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 11" excavated in 2000 from cut 35  of the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. Art Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, of scenmatic men and weapons carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 11" excavated in 2000 from cut 35  of the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. Art Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, of scenmatic men and weapons carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 11" excavated in 2000 from cut 35  of the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. Art Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, of a geometric design carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 10"  excavated in 2000 from cut 35 of the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. Grey Art Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, of a geometric design carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 10"  excavated in 2000 from cut 35 of the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. Grey Art Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, of a geometric design carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 10"  excavated in 2000 from cut 35 of the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. Grey Art Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, of a geometric design carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 10"  excavated in 2000 from cut 35 of the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. Grey Art Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, of a geometric design carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 10"  excavated in 2000 from cut 35 of the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. Grey Art Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, of a geometric design carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 6" excavated in 2000 from the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. Grey Art Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, of a geometric design carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 6" excavated in 2000 from the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. Black  Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, of a geometric design carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 6" excavated in 2000 from the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. Grey  Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, of a geometric design carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 6" excavated in 2000 from the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. White Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, of a geometric design carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 6" excavated in 2000 from the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. Art Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 4" excavated in 1984 from the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. Black Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 4" excavated in 1984 from the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. Art Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 4" excavated in 1984 from the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 4" excavated in 1984 from the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. Grey Art Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 4" excavated in 1984 from the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. White Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 4" excavated in 1984 from the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. Grey Art Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 4" excavated in 1984 from the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. Black Background
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 4" excavated in 1984 from the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy
  • Prehistoric  petroglyphs, rock carvings, carved by the the prehistoric Camuni people in the Copper Age around the 3rd milleneum BC, Stele "Cemmo 4" excavated in 1984 from the prehistoric sanctuary Massi dei Cemmo Archaeological Site. Museo Nazionale della Preistoria della Valle Camonica ( National Museum of Prehistory in Valle Cominca ), Lombardy, Italy. Art Background
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Early Christian Byzantine Basin with Crosses in the Byzantine shop area next to the gymnasium of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Early Christian Byzantine Basin with Crosses in the Byzantine shop area next to the gymnasium of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Early Christian Byzantine Basin with Crosses in the Byzantine shop area next to the gymnasium of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD eagle decorated column base of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman fresco of the divine lovers Venus and Mars, Naples National Archaeological Museum , one of the best paintings excavated from Pompeii, from the house of Venus and Mars (VII 9 47), inv 9248,
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman fresco of the divine lovers Venus and Mars, Naples National Archaeological Museum , one of the best paintings excavated from Pompeii, from the house of Venus and Mars (VII 9 47), inv 9248,
  • Roman mosaics - Rooms of an excavated villa from Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Rooms of an excavated villa from Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - The Wedding of Dionysus mosaic. Dionysus Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd  century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The Wedding of Dionysus and Ariadne Mosaic, which belongs to the House of Dionysus, is one of the most special mosaics around the world. In the scene, Dionysus and Ariadne are sitting on a sofa. There are three maenads, musician, the wedding god and two sirens around them. <br />
<br />
The mosaic gives the impression of a painting due to the rich variety of colors and luminous/shadow effects used. The fact that there are many figures within the mosaic and their high pictorial quality, on the other hand, makes the mosaic much more special. <br />
<br />
The House of Dionysus is the villa where a rescue excavation was conducted in 1992 upon the received intelligence telling that traffickers had been digging the area. After the excavations, the mosaic now you behold was unearthed along with some geometric mosaics. In terms of the exactness in the anatomy of the figures, the perspective, and the rich variety of colors it is among the most precious and important mosaic around the world. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Museum had conducted activities in order to display the mosaic where it belongs and in a natural manner. However, such a big portion of the mosaic as two thirds was stolen by the historical artefact traffickers in 1998 from the place of display. The parts of the mosaic are not found yet. After the robbery, the remaining parts were transported to Gaziantep Museum and displayed after restoration. The stolen part of the mosaic was left blank. The searches continue in order to find the missing parts through the Interpol.
  • Roman mosaics - Close up of The Wedding of Dionysus mosaic. Dionysus Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd  century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The Wedding of Dionysus and Ariadne Mosaic, which belongs to the House of Dionysus, is one of the most special mosaics around the world. In the scene, Dionysus and Ariadne are sitting on a sofa. There are three maenads, musician, the wedding god and two sirens around them. <br />
<br />
The mosaic gives the impression of a painting due to the rich variety of colors and luminous/shadow effects used. The fact that there are many figures within the mosaic and their high pictorial quality, on the other hand, makes the mosaic much more special. <br />
<br />
The House of Dionysus is the villa where a rescue excavation was conducted in 1992 upon the received intelligence telling that traffickers had been digging the area. After the excavations, the mosaic now you behold was unearthed along with some geometric mosaics. In terms of the exactness in the anatomy of the figures, the perspective, and the rich variety of colors it is among the most precious and important mosaic around the world. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Museum had conducted activities in order to display the mosaic where it belongs and in a natural manner. However, such a big portion of the mosaic as two thirds was stolen by the historical artefact traffickers in 1998 from the place of display. The parts of the mosaic are not found yet. After the robbery, the remaining parts were transported to Gaziantep Museum and displayed after restoration. The stolen part of the mosaic was left blank. The searches continue in order to find the missing parts through the Interpol.

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