• London Eye in the snow - london, England
  • London Eye in the snow - london, England
  • London Eye in the snow - london, England
  • London Eye in the snow - london, England
  • London Eye in the snow - london, England
  • London Eye in the snow - london, England
  • London Eye in the snow - london, England
  • London Eye in the snow - london, England
  • London Eye in the snow - london, England
  • London Eye in the snow - london, England
  • London Eye
  • London Eye
  • London Eye
  • London Eye. London England
  • London Eye. London England
  • London Eye. London England
  • London Eye in the snow - london, England
  • London Eye in the snow - london, England
  • London Eye in the snow - london, England
  • London Eye in the snow - london, England
  • London Eye
  • London Eye. London England
  • London Eye. London England
  • London Eye. London England
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 57: King Harold is killed by an arrow in his eye as he looses the Battle of Hastings.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 57: King Harold is killed by an arrow in his eye as he looses the Battle of Hastings.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 57: King Harold is killed by an arrow in his eye as he looses the Battle of Hastings.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 57: King Harold is killed by an arrow in his eye as he looses the Battle of Hastings.  BYX57
  • Dolls head with staring eyes
  • Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament - London
  • Organic Black Eyed Beans - Stock Photos
  • Organic Black Eyed Beans - Stock Photos
  • Organic dried Black Eyed Beans - Stock Photos
  • Raw Black eyed Beans
  • Eyes  -  Artistic Eye -  Fine art Polarids prints series
  • Eyes - The apple of your eye -  Fine art Polarids prints series
  • Eyes  - Plank In His Eye - Fine art Polarids prints series
  • Bone hook & eye fastener thought to be for fastening clothing. Many have been found at Catalhoyuk . Catalhoyuk collection, Konya Archaeological Museum, Turkey. Against a gray background
  • 11th Century Medieval Bayeux Tapestry - Scene 57 - Harold dies after being shot in the eye with an arrow. Scene 58 - Williams army routes the saxom army. Battle of Hastings 1066.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Bone hook & eye fastener thought to be for fastening clothing. Many have been found at Catalhoyuk . Catalhoyuk collection, Konya Archaeological Museum, Turkey. Against a white background
  • Bone hook & eye fastener thought to be for fastening clothing. Many have been found at Catalhoyuk . Catalhoyuk collection, Konya Archaeological Museum, Turkey. Against a black background
  • Bone hook & eye fastener thought to be for fastening clothing. Many have been found at Catalhoyuk . Catalhoyuk collection, Konya Archaeological Museum, Turkey
  • Bone hook & eye fastener thought to be for fastening clothing. Many have been found at Catalhoyuk . Catalhoyuk collection, Konya Archaeological Museum, Turkey. Against a grey background
  • 11th Century Medieval Bayeux Tapestry - Scene 57 - Harold dies after being shot in the eye with an arrow.
  • 11th Century Medieval Bayeux Tapestry - Scene 57 - Harold dies after being shot in the eye with an arrow. Battle of Hastings 1066.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Early Renaissance frescoes by Vitale da Bologna (1309 — 1369) of Christ Pantocrator (in majesty), pinted in the Byzantine style of Christ appearing in a madorla or eye. Church of Santa Maria, Benedictine Abbey of Pomposa, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
  • Female figurine statuette : Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety. Early Cycladic Period II, (2800-2300 BC), ' Museum of Cycladic Art Athens. Against white.<br />
<br />
The cycaldic figurine has its facial features preserved in relief. The eyes, eye brows and hair was probably painted which subsequently protected theses areas of the marble from erosion. Red pigment was found on the cheek and thighs. This is a mature work of the Spedos variety
  • Female figurine statuette : Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety. Early Cycladic Period II, (2800-2300 BC), ' Museum of Cycladic Art Athens.<br />
<br />
The cycaldic figurine has its facial features preserved in relief. The eyes, eye brows and hair was probably painted which subsequently protected theses areas of the marble from erosion. Red pigment was found on the cheek and thighs. This is a mature work of the Spedos variety
  • Female figurine statuette : Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety. Early Cycladic Period II, (2800-2300 BC), ' Museum of Cycladic Art Athens. Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The cycaldic figurine has its facial features preserved in relief. The eyes, eye brows and hair was probably painted which subsequently protected theses areas of the marble from erosion. Red pigment was found on the cheek and thighs. This is a mature work of the Spedos variety
  • Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against white.<br />
<br />
The cycladic figurine has a band etched high on its forehead and a large area on the back of the head of spiralling curls. The surface has probably been protected by paint and the outline of the left eye paint is still detectable as a greyish tinge. It can be assumed that both hair and eyes were painted. Canonical type, Spedos variety
  • Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against black.<br />
<br />
The cycladic figurine has a band etched high on its forehead and a large area on the back of the head of spiralling curls. The surface has probably been protected by paint and the outline of the left eye paint is still detectable as a greyish tinge. It can be assumed that both hair and eyes were painted. Canonical type, Spedos variety
  • Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,<br />
<br />
The cycladic figurine has a band etched high on its forehead and a large area on the back of the head of spiralling curls. The surface has probably been protected by paint and the outline of the left eye paint is still detectable as a greyish tinge. It can be assumed that both hair and eyes were painted. Canonical type, Spedos variety
  • Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The cycladic figurine has a band etched high on its forehead and a large area on the back of the head of spiralling curls. The surface has probably been protected by paint and the outline of the left eye paint is still detectable as a greyish tinge. It can be assumed that both hair and eyes were painted. Canonical type, Spedos variety
  • Female figurine statuette : Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety. Early Cycladic Period II, (2800-2300 BC), ' Museum of Cycladic Art Athens.  Against black<br />
<br />
<br />
The cycaldic figurine has its facial features preserved in relief. The eyes, eye brows and hair was probably painted which subsequently protected theses areas of the marble from erosion. Red pigment was found on the cheek and thighs. This is a mature work of the Spedos variety
  • Female figurine statuette : Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety. Early Cycladic Period II, (2800-2300 BC), ' Museum of Cycladic Art Athens. Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The cycaldic figurine has its facial features preserved in relief. The eyes, eye brows and hair was probably painted which subsequently protected theses areas of the marble from erosion. Red pigment was found on the cheek and thighs. This is a mature work of the Spedos variety
  • Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The cycladic figurine has a band etched high on its forehead and a large area on the back of the head of spiralling curls. The surface has probably been protected by paint and the outline of the left eye paint is still detectable as a greyish tinge. It can be assumed that both hair and eyes were painted. Canonical type, Spedos variety
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Ox Eye Daisy. Fine Art Black and White Pictures Wall Art Prints Polaroid Photos by photographer Paul Williams,
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • A Colossal statue of a Bird of Prey excavated in the forecourt of a temple palace at Tell Halaf, Syria. Originally the bird statue had coloured stones in its eye socket and was mounted as part of a decorative column. Basalt 9th century BC. Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • A Colossal statue of a Bird of Prey excavated in the forecourt of a temple palace at Tell Halaf, Syria. Originally the bird statue had coloured stones in its eye socket and was mounted as part of a decorative column. Basalt 9th century BC. Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • A Colossal statue of a Bird of Prey excavated in the forecourt of a temple palace at Tell Halaf, Syria. Originally the bird statue had coloured stones in its eye socket and was mounted as part of a decorative column. Basalt 9th century BC. Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • A Colossal statue of a Bird of Prey excavated in the forecourt of a temple palace at Tell Halaf, Syria. Originally the bird statue had coloured stones in its eye socket and was mounted as part of a decorative column. Basalt 9th century BC. Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • Anglo Saxon sandstone cross shaft fragment, 775-840. The complicated pattern depicts ribbon shaped animals with long thin bodies and legs. An animals face can be seen in the bottom right in profile with one eye and a mouth .Lindisfarne Abbey Museum, Northumbria, England
  • Anglo Saxon sandstone cross shaft fragment, 775-840. The complicated pattern depicts ribbon shaped animals with long thin bodies and legs. An animals face can be seen in the bottom right in profile with one eye and a mouth .Lindisfarne Abbey Museum, Northumbria, England
  • Anglo Saxon sandstone cross shaft fragment, 775-840. The complicated pattern depicts ribbon shaped animals with long thin bodies and legs. An animals face can be seen in the bottom right in profile with one eye and a mouth .Lindisfarne Abbey Museum, Northumbria, England
  • Anglo Saxon sandstone cross shaft fragment, 775-840. The complicated pattern depicts ribbon shaped animals with long thin bodies and legs. An animals face can be seen in the bottom right in profile with one eye and a mouth .Lindisfarne Abbey Museum, Northumbria, England
  • Eyes  - their Eyes Met -  Fine art Polarids prints series
  • Eyes  - Shifty Eyes -  Fine art Polarids prints series
  • Eyes  - Wandering Eyes -. Fine art Polarids prints series
  • Ancient Egyptian stele dedicated to Meretsesger, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1279-1213 BC), Deir el-Medina, Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
The stele is divided into 3 registers. In the top section 2 wedjat eyes with shen sign above 3 zigzag lines indicating water are depicted. The second, largest register, is divided into 12 horizontal strips. Each is occupied by a coloured snake facing to the right.In the bottom register 3 columns of hieroglyphic text worship the goddess Meretseger: "life, strength and health to the ka and the lady of the house Wab, the justified." To the right of the text the deceased woman is kneeling with her hands raised in adoration. She  wears a white robe. A lotus flower is placed on top of her wig. Behind her head there are 4 hieroglyphic signs that form the phrase "at peace". To the right of the scene there is an offering table with a vessel flanked by a bunch of lotus flowers. Below the table there are 2 vessels on pedestals.
  • Ancient Egyptian stele dedicated to Meretsesger, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1279-1213 BC), Deir el-Medina, Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
The stele is divided into 3 registers. In the top section 2 wedjat eyes with shen sign above 3 zigzag lines indicating water are depicted. The second, largest register, is divided into 12 horizontal strips. Each is occupied by a coloured snake facing to the right.In the bottom register 3 columns of hieroglyphic text worship the goddess Meretseger: "life, strength and health to the ka and the lady of the house Wab, the justified." To the right of the text the deceased woman is kneeling with her hands raised in adoration. She  wears a white robe. A lotus flower is placed on top of her wig. Behind her head there are 4 hieroglyphic signs that form the phrase "at peace". To the right of the scene there is an offering table with a vessel flanked by a bunch of lotus flowers. Below the table there are 2 vessels on pedestals.
  • Ancient Egyptian stele dedicated to Meretsesger, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1279-1213 BC), Deir el-Medina, Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
The stele is divided into 3 registers. In the top section 2 wedjat eyes with shen sign above 3 zigzag lines indicating water are depicted. The second, largest register, is divided into 12 horizontal strips. Each is occupied by a coloured snake facing to the right.In the bottom register 3 columns of hieroglyphic text worship the goddess Meretseger: "life, strength and health to the ka and the lady of the house Wab, the justified." To the right of the text the deceased woman is kneeling with her hands raised in adoration. She  wears a white robe. A lotus flower is placed on top of her wig. Behind her head there are 4 hieroglyphic signs that form the phrase "at peace". To the right of the scene there is an offering table with a vessel flanked by a bunch of lotus flowers. Below the table there are 2 vessels on pedestals.
  • Ancient Egyptian Roman female mummy mask, limestone, Roman Period, 2nd Cent AD, Hawara,  Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background<br />
<br />
This is a remarkable gilt cartonnage with inlaid cystal eyes . The woman wears a Roman style hardo half covered by a veil, a himation, fringed cloak, yied to her breat, snake shaped bracelets and a necklace of pink flowers, all of which are connected to the cult of Isis.
  • Ancient Egyptian Roman female mummy mask, limestone, Roman Period, 2nd Cent AD, Hawara,  Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background<br />
<br />
This is a remarkable gilt cartonnage with inlaid cystal eyes . The woman wears a Roman style hardo half covered by a veil, a himation, fringed cloak, yied to her breat, snake shaped bracelets and a necklace of pink flowers, all of which are connected to the cult of Isis.
  • Ancient Egyptian cult statue of Amenhoptep I, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1292-1190 BC, Deir el-Medina. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
The cult of Amenhoptep I flourished during the 19th &20th Dynasties. This statue is typical of Theban sculpture of the Ramesside era : large eyes, full cheeks and aquiline nose. the kings skin colour is white rather than the more common red hue. This is typical of other Deir el-Medina statues of the era.  Drovetti collection. Cat 1372.
  • Ancient Egyptian cult statue of Amenhoptep I, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1292-1190 BC, Deir el-Medina. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
The cult of Amenhoptep I flourished during the 19th &20th Dynasties. This statue is typical of Theban sculpture of the Ramesside era : large eyes, full cheeks and aquiline nose. the kings skin colour is white rather than the more common red hue. This is typical of other Deir el-Medina statues of the era.  Drovetti collection. Cat 1372.
  • Ancient Egyptian Sphinx statue, sandstone, New Kingdom, early 19th Dynasty (1292-1250), Karnak, Temple of Amon. Egyptian Museum, Turin. <br />
<br />
This sphinx statue show signs of remodelling. the accentuated curves of the eyebrows, the almond shaped eyes and the wide mouth with fleshy lips are still influenced by the late 18th Dynasty style. The long aquiline nose however is typical of Ramesside. The lappets of the nemes headdress and the beard show clear traces of unfinished re-carving. Drovetti Collection. C1409
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of pharaoh Horemheb with god Amun, limestone, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1319-1292 BC). Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Horemheb stands beside the taller depiction of the god Amun. The statue is typical of the period following the religious and artistic revolution of King Akhenaten. The muscles are not emphasised and the contours are soft, with rounded hips and juvenile faces, the eyes are almond shaped and the cheeks and lips sensual. Some scholars believe this may have been a statue of Tutenkhamon remodelled by Horemheb. Dorvetti collection. C 768
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of pharaoh Horemheb with god Amun, limestone, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1319-1292 BC). Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
Horemheb stands beside the taller depiction of the god Amun. The statue is typical of the period following the religious and artistic revolution of King Akhenaten. The muscles are not emphasised and the contours are soft, with rounded hips and juvenile faces, the eyes are almond shaped and the cheeks and lips sensual. Some scholars believe this may have been a statue of Tutenkhamon remodelled by Horemheb. Dorvetti collection. C 768
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of pharaoh Horemheb with god Amun, limestone, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1319-1292 BC). Egyptian Museum, Turin. .<br />
<br />
Horemheb stands beside the taller depiction of the god Amun. The statue is typical of the period following the religious and artistic revolution of King Akhenaten. The muscles are not emphasised and the contours are soft, with rounded hips and juvenile faces, the eyes are almond shaped and the cheeks and lips sensual. Some scholars believe this may have been a statue of Tutenkhamon remodelled by Horemheb. Dorvetti collection. C 768
  • Fine Minoan translucent limestone lioness head shaped rhython from the  Knossos Palace Repositories 1600-1500 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.<br />
<br />
This exquitely worked lioness head rhython has a hole in the muzzle for pouring liquid offerings. The nose and eyes were originally inlaid
  • Ancient Greek Archaic statuette of a  kore, found in the Acropolis Athens, 490 BC, Athens National Archaeological Museum. Cat no BE 16/2009. Against white.<br />
<br />
The kore statues hair is adorned with a wreath and her ears by round disk earings. Traces of paint can be found on her garments and jewellery. Red paint was found on her hair and eyes, Acropolis Museum Cat no 687
  • Bronze archaic ancient Greek statue of Poseidon, found in the ancient port of Plataiai, Gulf of Livadostra, Athens National Archaeological Museum. Cat No X11761. Against black<br />
<br />
In this bronze statue of the god Poseidon he would have held a trident in his right hand and probably a dolphin with his left. The statues eyes are made of inlaid material.
  • Bronze archaic ancient Greek statue of Poseidon, found in the ancient port of Plataiai, Gulf of Livadostra, Athens National Archaeological Museum. Cat No X11761.<br />
<br />
In this bronze statue of the god Poseidon he would have held a trident in his right hand and probably a dolphin with his left. The statues eyes are made of inlaid material.
  • Minoan cay vase with painted lilies on a dark background from Akrotiri, Thira (Santorini), National Archaeological Museum Athens. 17th-16th cent BC.<br />
<br />
This fine example of Minoan Theran polychrome pottery depicts two lions or panthers in full flight with two eyes on its spout. By the same painter as the 'Dolphing Jugs'  From the French Archaeological School in Athens collection.
  • Minoan cay vase with painted lilies on a dark background from Akrotiri, Thira (Santorini), National Archaeological Museum Athens. 17th-16th cent BC.<br />
<br />
This fine example of Minoan Theran polychrome pottery depicts two lions or panthers in full flight with two eyes on its spout. By the same painter as the 'Dolphing Jugs'  From the French Archaeological School in Athens collection.
  • 'Flying gallop' clay vase. Minoan Polychrome arge jug with eyes on its spout and lions or panthers, Akrotiri, Thira (Santorini) National Archaeological Museum Athens. 17th-16th cent BC.<br />
<br />
This fine example of Minoan Theran polychrome pottery depicts two lions or panthers in full flight with two eyes on its spout. By the same painter as the 'Dolphing Jugs'  From the French Archaeological School in Athens collection.
  • 'Flying gallop' clay vase. Minoan Polychrome arge jug with eyes on its spout and lions or panthers, Akrotiri, Thira (Santorini) National Archaeological Museum Athens. 17th-16th cent BC.<br />
<br />
This fine example of Minoan Theran polychrome pottery depicts two lions or panthers in full flight with two eyes on its spout. By the same painter as the 'Dolphing Jugs'  From the French Archaeological School in Athens collection.
  • 'Flying gallop' clay vase. Minoan Polychrome arge jug with eyes on its spout and lions or panthers, Akrotiri, Thira (Santorini) National Archaeological Museum Athens. 17th-16th cent BC.<br />
<br />
This fine example of Minoan Theran polychrome pottery depicts two lions or panthers in full flight with two eyes on its spout. By the same painter as the 'Dolphing Jugs'  From the French Archaeological School in Athens collection.
  • 'Flying gallop' clay vase. Minoan Polychrome arge jug with eyes on its spout and lions or panthers, Akrotiri, Thira (Santorini) National Archaeological Museum Athens. 17th-16th cent BC.<br />
<br />
This fine example of Minoan Theran polychrome pottery depicts two lions or panthers in full flight with two eyes on its spout. By the same painter as the 'Dolphing Jugs'  From the French Archaeological School in Athens collection.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-3200) from Naxos, Cat No 20934. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Black background.<br />
<br />
One of the largest known Cycladic statues at 89CM tall this figurine still has traces of a colour on the hair and eyes.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-3200) from Naxos, Cat No 20934. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
One of the largest known Cycladic statues at 89CM tall this figurine still has traces of a colour on the hair and eyes.
  • Head of a Cycladic statue with remnants of painted eyes and right cheek, Parian Marble, Amorgos, Early Cycladic II period (2800-3200BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • Mycenaean gold death mask, Grave Cicle A, Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.  White background.<br />
<br />
This death mask is typical of the other Mycenaean gold death masks fround in Grave V except in this mask the eyes are open. made from a sigle sheet of gold the shape of the face would have been hammered ot against wood. two holes either side of the gold mask allowed it to be held over the dead mans face. As weapons were found in the graves of Grave Circle A at Mycenae, those buried here wer warriors and maybe kings as the grave goods buried with them were of great value. 16th century BC
  • Mycenaean gold death mask, Grave Cicle A, Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.  Grey Background<br />
<br />
<br />
This death mask is typical of the other Mycenaean gold death masks fround in Grave V except in this mask the eyes are open. made from a sigle sheet of gold the shape of the face would have been hammered ot against wood. two holes either side of the gold mask allowed it to be held over the dead mans face. As weapons were found in the graves of Grave Circle A at Mycenae, those buried here wer warriors and maybe kings as the grave goods buried with them were of great value. 16th century BC
  • Mycenaean gold death mask, Grave Cicle A, Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.<br />
<br />
This death mask is typical of the other Mycenaean gold death masks fround in Grave V except in this mask the eyes are open. made from a sigle sheet of gold the shape of the face would have been hammered ot against wood. two holes either side of the gold mask allowed it to be held over the dead mans face. As weapons were found in the graves of Grave Circle A at Mycenae, those buried here wer warriors and maybe kings as the grave goods buried with them were of great value. 16th century BC
  • Mycenaean gold death mask, Grave Cicle A, Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.   Grey Art Background<br />
<br />
 This death mask is typical of the other Mycenaean gold death masks fround in Grave V except in this mask the eyes are open. made from a sigle sheet of gold the shape of the face would have been hammered ot against wood. two holes either side of the gold mask allowed it to be held over the dead mans face. As weapons were found in the graves of Grave Circle A at Mycenae, those buried here wer warriors and maybe kings as the grave goods buried with them were of great value. 16th century BC
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nysa and baby Dionysus Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The nymph Nysa has the baby Dionysus on her lap. He reaches out to a bunch of grapes held up by a satyr, one of his woodland followers. Dionysus was the son of Zeus by Semele, and was given the nymphs of Mt Nysa for an upbringing in the wilds, safe from the eyes of Hera, Zeus’s wife. Nysa was located in the Meander Valley, near Aphrodisias: the story was local.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nysa and baby Dionysus Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The nymph Nysa has the baby Dionysus on her lap. He reaches out to a bunch of grapes held up by a satyr, one of his woodland followers. Dionysus was the son of Zeus by Semele, and was given the nymphs of Mt Nysa for an upbringing in the wilds, safe from the eyes of Hera, Zeus’s wife. Nysa was located in the Meander Valley, near Aphrodisias: the story was local.
  • Roman mosaics - Metiochus and Parthenope Mosaic.  2nd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Metiochus and Parthenope, famous with their legendary love for eat: torn apart and then unified after years, they seem to represent the According to the myth, Parthenope is the sister of Polycrat e Ki taken an oath of virginity upon the Heraion which symbolizes the Metiochus is invited to the royal court and meets Parthenope Burin fails in love with Metiochus but in order to keep the oath she has taken, she and chooses to go exile. In this mosaic, we see the two figures sfttngsitting upon an In compliance with the story, the face of Metiochus is directed towards Part e whom he fell in love and the eyes of Parthenope stares at an indeterminate area due to the love she feels yet sees impossible. The mosaic is surrounded by triangular, double mesh ttke, and pyramidal borders. The piece was discovered during the rescue excavation conducted. in 1993. When exposed, it was understood that the main figures used to be at the middle of the mosaic were stolen the tomb-robbers. <br />
<br />
The mosaic was brought to Gaziantep Museum with a question mark labeled on it saying "Who knows where? In which country?" and began to be displayed temporarily after restoration. From the photographs sent by the Canadian Archaeologist Sheila Campbell, it was found out that the stolen parts were in the Merin collection in Houston USA and with the initiatives of the Ministry of Culture, the missing parts were brought In 2000 and the mosaic was put on display following the restoration. Those two eternal lovers, who were torn apart by traffickers of historical artefacts and kidnapped separately, have been unified after years.
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Picture and image of the Neo Gothic Erba stone tomb sculpture of a female figure, with her eyes closed and some poppy seeds in her hands, which are a pagan symbol with a funeral meaning because of their narcotic properties. The garment, stretching along her arm, leaves one shoulder undressed, thus giving the sleeper a touch of sensuality that did not fail to arouse some controversy among the contemporaries. By Sculptor Sculptor S. Saccomanno 1883.  Section A, no 50, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of a stone sculpture of an angel by Sculptor V. Lavezzari 1897 on the Repetto tomb. The angel is holding a club and has a vacant look in its eyes giving it a mysterious sense of death. Section A, no 52, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • 6th-7th Century v Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a grey background.
  • Gold Death Mask  from Grave V, Grave Circle A, Mycenae. The mask is made of a thin sheet of beaten gold and is the only mask from grave circle A with eyes open. 16th century BC. Cat No 259 Athens Archaeological Museum.
  • Copper statuettes of warriors with a short loincloth which originally held weapons in their hands, as well as representation of a woman. These acquired in the art trade figures were probably made ​​in the mountains of Lebanon. They are characterised by the rigid body shapes and rough running faces, whose eyes were inserted once. 3rd century BC , Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Copper statuettes of warriors with a short loincloth which originally held weapons in their hands, as well as representation of a woman. These acquired in the art trade figures were probably made ​​in the mountains of Lebanon. They are characterised by the rigid body shapes and rough running faces, whose eyes were inserted once. 3rd century BC , Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Copper statuettes of warriors with a short loincloth which originally held weapons in their hands, as well as representation of a woman. These acquired in the art trade figures were probably made ​​in the mountains of Lebanon. They are characterised by the rigid body shapes and rough running faces, whose eyes were inserted once. 3rd century BC , Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Copper statuettes of warriors with a short loincloth which originally held weapons in their hands, as well as representation of a woman. These acquired in the art trade figures were probably made ​​in the mountains of Lebanon. They are characterised by the rigid body shapes and rough running faces, whose eyes were inserted once. 3rd century BC , Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Copper statuettes of warriors with a short loincloth which originally held weapons in their hands, as well as representation of a woman. These acquired in the art trade figures were probably made ​​in the mountains of Lebanon. They are characterised by the rigid body shapes and rough running faces, whose eyes were inserted once. 3rd century BC , Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Copper statuettes of warriors with a short loincloth which originally held weapons in their hands, as well as representation of a woman. These acquired in the art trade figures were probably made ​​in the mountains of Lebanon. They are characterised by the rigid body shapes and rough running faces, whose eyes were inserted once. 3rd century BC , Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statue of the Emperor Titus - an end of the 1st century AD Roman statue probably from Rome. Titus was Emperor of the Romans fom 79 to 81 AD. The statue looks like it may have recieved some restoration especially around the eyes and the style of changes points to the sculptor Girardon in 1685. From the French Royal Collection  Inv MR 358   (or Ma 1067), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Statue of the Emperor Titus - an end of the 1st century AD Roman statue probably from Rome. Titus was Emperor of the Romans fom 79 to 81 AD. The statue looks like it may have recieved some restoration especially around the eyes and the style of changes points to the sculptor Girardon in 1685. From the French Royal Collection  Inv MR 358   (or Ma 1067), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Statue of the Emperor Titus - an end of the 1st century AD Roman statue probably from Rome. Titus was Emperor of the Romans fom 79 to 81 AD. The statue looks like it may have recieved some restoration especially around the eyes and the style of changes points to the sculptor Girardon in 1685. From the French Royal Collection  Inv MR 358   (or Ma 1067), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Statue of the Emperor Titus - an end of the 1st century AD Roman statue probably from Rome. Titus was Emperor of the Romans fom 79 to 81 AD. The statue looks like it may have recieved some restoration especially around the eyes and the style of changes points to the sculptor Girardon in 1685. From the French Royal Collection  Inv MR 358   (or Ma 1067), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Ancient Egyptian stele dedicated to Meretsesger, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1279-1213 BC), Deir el-Medina, Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background.<br />
<br />
The stele is divided into 3 registers. In the top section 2 wedjat eyes with shen sign above 3 zigzag lines indicating water are depicted. The second, largest register, is divided into 12 horizontal strips. Each is occupied by a coloured snake facing to the right.In the bottom register 3 columns of hieroglyphic text worship the goddess Meretseger: "life, strength and health to the ka and the lady of the house Wab, the justified." To the right of the text the deceased woman is kneeling with her hands raised in adoration. She  wears a white robe. A lotus flower is placed on top of her wig. Behind her head there are 4 hieroglyphic signs that form the phrase "at peace". To the right of the scene there is an offering table with a vessel flanked by a bunch of lotus flowers. Below the table there are 2 vessels on pedestals.
  • Ancient Egyptian stele dedicated to Meretsesger, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1279-1213 BC), Deir el-Medina, Egyptian Museum, Turin. <br />
<br />
The stele is divided into 3 registers. In the top section 2 wedjat eyes with shen sign above 3 zigzag lines indicating water are depicted. The second, largest register, is divided into 12 horizontal strips. Each is occupied by a coloured snake facing to the right.In the bottom register 3 columns of hieroglyphic text worship the goddess Meretseger: "life, strength and health to the ka and the lady of the house Wab, the justified." To the right of the text the deceased woman is kneeling with her hands raised in adoration. She  wears a white robe. A lotus flower is placed on top of her wig. Behind her head there are 4 hieroglyphic signs that form the phrase "at peace". To the right of the scene there is an offering table with a vessel flanked by a bunch of lotus flowers. Below the table there are 2 vessels on pedestals.
  • Ancient Egyptian Roman female mummy mask, limestone, Roman Period, 2nd Cent AD, Hawara,  Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background<br />
<br />
This is a remarkable gilt cartonnage with inlaid cystal eyes . The woman wears a Roman style hardo half covered by a veil, a himation, fringed cloak, yied to her breat, snake shaped bracelets and a necklace of pink flowers, all of which are connected to the cult of Isis.
  • Ancient Egyptian Roman female mummy mask, limestone, Roman Period, 2nd Cent AD, Hawara,  Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background<br />
<br />
This is a remarkable gilt cartonnage with inlaid cystal eyes . The woman wears a Roman style hardo half covered by a veil, a himation, fringed cloak, yied to her breat, snake shaped bracelets and a necklace of pink flowers, all of which are connected to the cult of Isis.
  • Ancient Egyptian Roman female mummy mask, limestone, Roman Period, 2nd Cent AD, Hawara,  Egyptian Museum, Turin. <br />
<br />
This is a remarkable gilt cartonnage with inlaid cystal eyes . The woman wears a Roman style hardo half covered by a veil, a himation, fringed cloak, yied to her breat, snake shaped bracelets and a necklace of pink flowers, all of which are connected to the cult of Isis.
  • Ancient Egyptian cult statue of Amenhoptep I, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1292-1190 BC, Deir el-Medina. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background<br />
<br />
The cult of Amenhoptep I flourished during the 19th &20th Dynasties. This statue is typical of Theban sculpture of the Ramesside era : large eyes, full cheeks and aquiline nose. the kings skin colour is white rather than the more common red hue. This is typical of other Deir el-Medina statues of the era.  Drovetti collection. Cat 1372.
  • Ancient Egyptian cult statue of Amenhoptep I, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1292-1190 BC, Deir el-Medina. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
The cult of Amenhoptep I flourished during the 19th &20th Dynasties. This statue is typical of Theban sculpture of the Ramesside era : large eyes, full cheeks and aquiline nose. the kings skin colour is white rather than the more common red hue. This is typical of other Deir el-Medina statues of the era.  Drovetti collection. Cat 1372.
  • Ancient Egyptian cult statue of Amenhoptep I, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1292-1190 BC, Deir el-Medina. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
The cult of Amenhoptep I flourished during the 19th &20th Dynasties. This statue is typical of Theban sculpture of the Ramesside era : large eyes, full cheeks and aquiline nose. the kings skin colour is white rather than the more common red hue. This is typical of other Deir el-Medina statues of the era.  Drovetti collection. Cat 1372.
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of the god Ptah, granodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1390-1353 BC)Karnak. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background,.<br />
<br />
The statue of the god Ptah is in the likeness of the reigning king Amenhotep III with a youthful almost feminine face, full cheeks, large smiling mouth and fleshy lips. The large almond shaped eyes are characteristic of the period as is the outline of the lips, Drovetti collection. Cat 86
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of the god Ptah, granodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1390-1353 BC)Karnak. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background,<br />
<br />
The statue of the god Ptah is in the likeness of the reigning king Amenhotep III with a youthful almost feminine face, full cheeks, large smiling mouth and fleshy lips. The large almond shaped eyes are characteristic of the period as is the outline of the lips, Drovetti collection. Cat 86
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of the god Ptah, granodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1390-1353 BC)Karnak. Egyptian Museum, Turin. <br />
<br />
The statue of the god Ptah is in the likeness of the reigning king Amenhotep III with a youthful almost feminine face, full cheeks, large smiling mouth and fleshy lips. The large almond shaped eyes are characteristic of the period as is the outline of the lips, Drovetti collection. Cat 86
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of the god Ptah, granodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1390-1353 BC)Karnak. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
The statue of the god Ptah is in the likeness of the reigning king Amenhotep III with a youthful almost feminine face, full cheeks, large smiling mouth and fleshy lips. The large almond shaped eyes are characteristic of the period as is the outline of the lips, Drovetti collection. Cat 86
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of the god Ptah, granodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1390-1353 BC)Karnak. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
The statue of the god Ptah is in the likeness of the reigning king Amenhotep III with a youthful almost feminine face, full cheeks, large smiling mouth and fleshy lips. The large almond shaped eyes are characteristic of the period as is the outline of the lips, Drovetti collection. Cat 86
  • Ancient Egyptian Sphinx statue, sandstone, New Kingdom, early 19th Dynasty (1292-1250), Karnak, Temple of Amon. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background<br />
<br />
This sphinx statue show signs of remodelling. the accentuated curves of the eyebrows, the almond shaped eyes and the wide mouth with fleshy lips are still influenced by the late 18th Dynasty style. The long aquiline nose however is typical of Ramesside. The lappets of the nemes headdress and the beard show clear traces of unfinished re-carving. Drovetti Collection. C1409
  • Ancient Egyptian Sphinx statue, sandstone, New Kingdom, early 19th Dynasty (1292-1250), Karnak, Temple of Amon. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background<br />
<br />
This sphinx statue show signs of remodelling. the accentuated curves of the eyebrows, the almond shaped eyes and the wide mouth with fleshy lips are still influenced by the late 18th Dynasty style. The long aquiline nose however is typical of Ramesside. The lappets of the nemes headdress and the beard show clear traces of unfinished re-carving. Drovetti Collection. C1409
  • Ancient Egyptian Sphinx statue, sandstone, New Kingdom, early 19th Dynasty (1292-1250), Karnak, Temple of Amon. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background<br />
<br />
This sphinx statue show signs of remodelling. the accentuated curves of the eyebrows, the almond shaped eyes and the wide mouth with fleshy lips are still influenced by the late 18th Dynasty style. The long aquiline nose however is typical of Ramesside. The lappets of the nemes headdress and the beard show clear traces of unfinished re-carving. Drovetti Collection. C1409
  • Ancient Egyptian Sphinx statue, sandstone, New Kingdom, early 19th Dynasty (1292-1250), Karnak, Temple of Amon. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background<br />
<br />
This sphinx statue show signs of remodelling. the accentuated curves of the eyebrows, the almond shaped eyes and the wide mouth with fleshy lips are still influenced by the late 18th Dynasty style. The long aquiline nose however is typical of Ramesside. The lappets of the nemes headdress and the beard show clear traces of unfinished re-carving. Drovetti Collection. C1409
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of pharaoh Horemheb with god Amun, limestone, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1319-1292 BC). Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
Horemheb stands beside the taller depiction of the god Amun. The statue is typical of the period following the religious and artistic revolution of King Akhenaten. The muscles are not emphasised and the contours are soft, with rounded hips and juvenile faces, the eyes are almond shaped and the cheeks and lips sensual. Some scholars believe this may have been a statue of Tutenkhamon remodelled by Horemheb. Dorvetti collection. C 768
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of pharaoh Horemheb with god Amun, limestone, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1319-1292 BC). Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Horemheb stands beside the taller depiction of the god Amun. The statue is typical of the period following the religious and artistic revolution of King Akhenaten. The muscles are not emphasised and the contours are soft, with rounded hips and juvenile faces, the eyes are almond shaped and the cheeks and lips sensual. Some scholars believe this may have been a statue of Tutenkhamon remodelled by Horemheb. Dorvetti collection. C 768
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of pharaoh Horemheb with god Amun, limestone, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1319-1292 BC). Egyptian Museum, Turin. .<br />
<br />
Horemheb stands beside the taller depiction of the god Amun. The statue is typical of the period following the religious and artistic revolution of King Akhenaten. The muscles are not emphasised and the contours are soft, with rounded hips and juvenile faces, the eyes are almond shaped and the cheeks and lips sensual. Some scholars believe this may have been a statue of Tutenkhamon remodelled by Horemheb. Dorvetti collection. C 768
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of pharaoh Horemheb with god Amun, limestone, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1319-1292 BC). Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background.<br />
<br />
Horemheb stands beside the taller depiction of the god Amun. The statue is typical of the period following the religious and artistic revolution of King Akhenaten. The muscles are not emphasised and the contours are soft, with rounded hips and juvenile faces, the eyes are almond shaped and the cheeks and lips sensual. Some scholars believe this may have been a statue of Tutenkhamon remodelled by Horemheb. Dorvetti collection. C 768
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of pharaoh Horemheb with god Amun, limestone, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1319-1292 BC). Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Horemheb stands beside the taller depiction of the god Amun. The statue is typical of the period following the religious and artistic revolution of King Akhenaten. The muscles are not emphasised and the contours are soft, with rounded hips and juvenile faces, the eyes are almond shaped and the cheeks and lips sensual. Some scholars believe this may have been a statue of Tutenkhamon remodelled by Horemheb. Dorvetti collection. C 768
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of pharaoh Horemheb with god Amun, limestone, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1319-1292 BC). Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Horemheb stands beside the taller depiction of the god Amun. The statue is typical of the period following the religious and artistic revolution of King Akhenaten. The muscles are not emphasised and the contours are soft, with rounded hips and juvenile faces, the eyes are almond shaped and the cheeks and lips sensual. Some scholars believe this may have been a statue of Tutenkhamon remodelled by Horemheb. Dorvetti collection. C 768
  • Fine Minoan translucent limestone lioness head shaped rhython from the  Knossos Palace Repositories 1600-1500 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.<br />
<br />
This exquitely worked lioness head rhython has a hole in the muzzle for pouring liquid offerings. The nose and eyes were originally inlaid
  • Fine Minoan translucent limestone lioness head shaped rhython from the  Knossos Palace Repositories 1600-1500 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, black background.<br />
<br />
This exquitely worked lioness head rhython has a hole in the muzzle for pouring liquid offerings. The nose and eyes were originally inlaid
  • Fine Minoan translucent limestone lioness head shaped rhython from the  Knossos Palace Repositories 1600-1500 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.<br />
<br />
This exquitely worked lioness head rhython has a hole in the muzzle for pouring liquid offerings. The nose and eyes were originally inlaid
  • Fine Minoan translucent limestone lioness head shaped rhython from the  Knossos Palace Repositories 1600-1500 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.<br />
<br />
This exquitely worked lioness head rhython has a hole in the muzzle for pouring liquid offerings. The nose and eyes were originally inlaid
  • Ancient Greek Archaic statuette of a  kore, found in the Acropolis Athens, 490 BC, Athens National Archaeological Museum. Cat no BE 16/2009. Against black<br />
<br />
The kore statues hair is adorned with a wreath and her ears by round disk earings. Traces of paint can be found on her garments and jewellery. Red paint was found on her hair and eyes, Acropolis Museum Cat no 687
  • Ancient Greek Archaic statuette of a  kore, found in the Acropolis Athens, 490 BC, Athens National Archaeological Museum. Cat no BE 16/2009.  Against grey.<br />
<br />
The kore statues hair is adorned with a wreath and her ears by round disk earings. Traces of paint can be found on her garments and jewellery. Red paint was found on her hair and eyes, Acropolis Museum Cat no 687
  • Ancient Greek Archaic statuette of a  kore, found in the Acropolis Athens, 490 BC, Athens National Archaeological Museum. Cat no BE 16/2009.<br />
<br />
The kore statues hair is adorned with a wreath and her ears by round disk earings. Traces of paint can be found on her garments and jewellery. Red paint was found on her hair and eyes, Acropolis Museum Cat no 687
  • Ancient Greek Archaic statuette of a  kore, found in the Acropolis Athens, 490 BC, Athens National Archaeological Museum. Cat no BE 16/2009.  Against grey.<br />
<br />
The kore statues hair is adorned with a wreath and her ears by round disk earings. Traces of paint can be found on her garments and jewellery. Red paint was found on her hair and eyes, Acropolis Museum Cat no 687
  • Ancient Greek Archaic statuette of a  kore, found in the Acropolis Athens, 500-490 BC, Athens National Archaeological Museum. Cat no BE 15/2009. Against white.<br />
<br />
The kore statues hair is adorned with a wreath and her ears by round disk earings. Traces of paint can be found on her garments and jewellery. Red paint was found on her hair and eyes. Acropolis Museum Cat no 676, 257
  • Ancient Greek Archaic statuette of a  kore, found in the Acropolis Athens, 500-490 BC, Athens National Archaeological Museum. Cat no BE 15/2009.  Against grey.<br />
<br />
The kore statues hair is adorned with a wreath and her ears by round disk earings. Traces of paint can be found on her garments and jewellery. Red paint was found on her hair and eyes. Acropolis Museum Cat no 676, 257
  • Ancient Greek Archaic statuette of a  kore, found in the Acropolis Athens, 500-490 BC, Athens National Archaeological Museum. Cat no BE 15/2009. Against black<br />
<br />
<br />
The kore statues hair is adorned with a wreath and her ears by round disk earings. Traces of paint can be found on her garments and jewellery. Red paint was found on her hair and eyes. Acropolis Museum Cat no 676, 257
  • Ancient Greek Archaic statuette of a  kore, found in the Acropolis Athens, 500-490 BC, Athens National Archaeological Museum. Cat no BE 15/2009.<br />
<br />
The kore statues hair is adorned with a wreath and her ears by round disk earings. Traces of paint can be found on her garments and jewellery. Red paint was found on her hair and eyes. Acropolis Museum Cat no 676, 257
  • Ancient Greek Archaic statuette of a  kore, found in the Acropolis Athens, 500-490 BC, Athens National Archaeological Museum. Cat no BE 15/2009.  Against grey.<br />
<br />
The kore statues hair is adorned with a wreath and her ears by round disk earings. Traces of paint can be found on her garments and jewellery. Red paint was found on her hair and eyes. Acropolis Museum Cat no 676, 257
  • Bronze archaic ancient Greek statue of Poseidon, found in the ancient port of Plataiai, Gulf of Livadostra, Athens National Archaeological Museum. Cat No X11761. Against white.<br />
<br />
In this bronze statue of the god Poseidon he would have held a trident in his right hand and probably a dolphin with his left. The statues eyes are made of inlaid material.
  • Bronze archaic ancient Greek statue of Poseidon, found in the ancient port of Plataiai, Gulf of Livadostra, Athens National Archaeological Museum. Cat No X11761. Against grey.<br />
<br />
In this bronze statue of the god Poseidon he would have held a trident in his right hand and probably a dolphin with his left. The statues eyes are made of inlaid material.
  • Bronze archaic ancient Greek statue of Poseidon, found in the ancient port of Plataiai, Gulf of Livadostra, Athens National Archaeological Museum. Cat No X11761. Against grey.<br />
<br />
In this bronze statue of the god Poseidon he would have held a trident in his right hand and probably a dolphin with his left. The statues eyes are made of inlaid material.
  • Minoan cay vase with painted lilies on a dark background from Akrotiri, Thira (Santorini), National Archaeological Museum Athens. 17th-16th cent BC.<br />
<br />
This fine example of Minoan Theran polychrome pottery depicts two lions or panthers in full flight with two eyes on its spout. By the same painter as the 'Dolphing Jugs'  From the French Archaeological School in Athens collection.
  • Minoan cay vase with painted lilies on a dark background from Akrotiri, Thira (Santorini), National Archaeological Museum Athens. 17th-16th cent BC.<br />
<br />
This fine example of Minoan Theran polychrome pottery depicts two lions or panthers in full flight with two eyes on its spout. By the same painter as the 'Dolphing Jugs'  From the French Archaeological School in Athens collection.
  • Minoan cay vase with painted lilies on a dark background from Akrotiri, Thira (Santorini), National Archaeological Museum Athens. 17th-16th cent BC.<br />
<br />
This fine example of Minoan Theran polychrome pottery depicts two lions or panthers in full flight with two eyes on its spout. By the same painter as the 'Dolphing Jugs'  From the French Archaeological School in Athens collection.
  • Minoan cay vase with painted lilies on a dark background from Akrotiri, Thira (Santorini), National Archaeological Museum Athens. 17th-16th cent BC.<br />
<br />
This fine example of Minoan Theran polychrome pottery depicts two lions or panthers in full flight with two eyes on its spout. By the same painter as the 'Dolphing Jugs'  From the French Archaeological School in Athens collection.
  • 'Flying gallop' clay vase. Minoan Polychrome arge jug with eyes on its spout and lions or panthers, Akrotiri, Thira (Santorini) National Archaeological Museum Athens. 17th-16th cent BC.<br />
<br />
This fine example of Minoan Theran polychrome pottery depicts two lions or panthers in full flight with two eyes on its spout. By the same painter as the 'Dolphing Jugs'  From the French Archaeological School in Athens collection.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-3200) from Naxos, Cat No 20934. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
One of the largest known Cycladic statues at 89CM tall this figurine still has traces of a colour on the hair and eyes.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-3200) from Naxos, Cat No 20934. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. <br />
<br />
One of the largest known Cycladic statues at 89CM tall this figurine still has traces of a colour on the hair and eyes.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-3200) from Naxos, Cat No 20934. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
One of the largest known Cycladic statues at 89CM tall this figurine still has traces of a colour on the hair and eyes.
  • Head of a Cycladic statue with remnants of painted eyes and right cheek, Parian Marble, Amorgos, Early Cycladic II period (2800-3200BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Black background.
  • Head of a Cycladic statue with remnants of painted eyes and right cheek, Parian Marble, Amorgos, Early Cycladic II period (2800-3200BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.
  • Head of a Cycladic statue with remnants of painted eyes and right cheek, Parian Marble, Amorgos, Early Cycladic II period (2800-3200BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Gray background.
  • Head of a Cycladic statue with remnants of painted eyes and right cheek, Parian Marble, Amorgos, Early Cycladic II period (2800-3200BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Grey background.
  • Mycenaean gold death mask, Grave Cicle A, Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.  Black Background<br />
<br />
This death mask is typical of the other Mycenaean gold death masks fround in Grave V except in this mask the eyes are open. made from a sigle sheet of gold the shape of the face would have been hammered ot against wood. two holes either side of the gold mask allowed it to be held over the dead mans face. As weapons were found in the graves of Grave Circle A at Mycenae, those buried here wer warriors and maybe kings as the grave goods buried with them were of great value. 16th century BC
  • Gold Death Mask  from Grave V, Grave Circle A, Mycenae. The mask is made of a thin sheet of beaten gold and is the only mask from grave circle A with eyes open. 16th century BC. Cat No 259 Athens Archaeological Museum.
  • Gold Death Mask  from Grave V, Grave Circle A, Mycenae. The mask is made of a thin sheet of beaten gold and is the only mask from grave circle A with eyes open. 16th century BC. Cat No 259 Athens Archaeological Museum.
  • Gold Death Mask  from Grave V, Grave Circle A, Mycenae. The mask is made of a thin sheet of beaten gold and is the only mask from grave circle A with eyes open. 16th century BC. Cat No 259 Athens Archaeological Museum.
  • Gold Death Mask  from Grave V, Grave Circle A, Mycenae. The mask is made of a thin sheet of beaten gold and is the only mask from grave circle A with eyes open. 16th century BC. Cat No 259 Athens Archaeological Museum.
  • Gold Death Mask  from Grave V, Grave Circle A, Mycenae. The mask is made of a thin sheet of beaten gold and is the only mask from grave circle A with eyes open. 16th century BC. Cat No 259 Athens Archaeological Museum.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nysa and baby Dionysus Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The nymph Nysa has the baby Dionysus on her lap. He reaches out to a bunch of grapes held up by a satyr, one of his woodland followers. Dionysus was the son of Zeus by Semele, and was given the nymphs of Mt Nysa for an upbringing in the wilds, safe from the eyes of Hera, Zeus’s wife. Nysa was located in the Meander Valley, near Aphrodisias: the story was local.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nysa and baby Dionysus Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The nymph Nysa has the baby Dionysus on her lap. He reaches out to a bunch of grapes held up by a satyr, one of his woodland followers. Dionysus was the son of Zeus by Semele, and was given the nymphs of Mt Nysa for an upbringing in the wilds, safe from the eyes of Hera, Zeus’s wife. Nysa was located in the Meander Valley, near Aphrodisias: the story was local.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nysa and baby Dionysus Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The nymph Nysa has the baby Dionysus on her lap. He reaches out to a bunch of grapes held up by a satyr, one of his woodland followers. Dionysus was the son of Zeus by Semele, and was given the nymphs of Mt Nysa for an upbringing in the wilds, safe from the eyes of Hera, Zeus’s wife. Nysa was located in the Meander Valley, near Aphrodisias: the story was local.
  • Roman mosaics - Metiochus and Parthenope Mosaic.  2nd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Metiochus and Parthenope, famous with their legendary love for eat: torn apart and then unified after years, they seem to represent the According to the myth, Parthenope is the sister of Polycrat e Ki taken an oath of virginity upon the Heraion which symbolizes the Metiochus is invited to the royal court and meets Parthenope Burin fails in love with Metiochus but in order to keep the oath she has taken, she and chooses to go exile. In this mosaic, we see the two figures sfttngsitting upon an In compliance with the story, the face of Metiochus is directed towards Part e whom he fell in love and the eyes of Parthenope stares at an indeterminate area due to the love she feels yet sees impossible. The mosaic is surrounded by triangular, double mesh ttke, and pyramidal borders. The piece was discovered during the rescue excavation conducted. in 1993. When exposed, it was understood that the main figures used to be at the middle of the mosaic were stolen the tomb-robbers. <br />
<br />
The mosaic was brought to Gaziantep Museum with a question mark labeled on it saying "Who knows where? In which country?" and began to be displayed temporarily after restoration. From the photographs sent by the Canadian Archaeologist Sheila Campbell, it was found out that the stolen parts were in the Merin collection in Houston USA and with the initiatives of the Ministry of Culture, the missing parts were brought In 2000 and the mosaic was put on display following the restoration. Those two eternal lovers, who were torn apart by traffickers of historical artefacts and kidnapped separately, have been unified after years.
  • Roman mosaics - Metiochus and Parthenope Mosaic.  2nd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Metiochus and Parthenope, famous with their legendary love for eat: torn apart and then unified after years, they seem to represent the According to the myth, Parthenope is the sister of Polycrat e Ki taken an oath of virginity upon the Heraion which symbolizes the Metiochus is invited to the royal court and meets Parthenope Burin fails in love with Metiochus but in order to keep the oath she has taken, she and chooses to go exile. In this mosaic, we see the two figures sfttngsitting upon an In compliance with the story, the face of Metiochus is directed towards Part e whom he fell in love and the eyes of Parthenope stares at an indeterminate area due to the love she feels yet sees impossible. The mosaic is surrounded by triangular, double mesh ttke, and pyramidal borders. The piece was discovered during the rescue excavation conducted. in 1993. When exposed, it was understood that the main figures used to be at the middle of the mosaic were stolen the tomb-robbers. <br />
<br />
The mosaic was brought to Gaziantep Museum with a question mark labeled on it saying "Who knows where? In which country?" and began to be displayed temporarily after restoration. From the photographs sent by the Canadian Archaeologist Sheila Campbell, it was found out that the stolen parts were in the Merin collection in Houston USA and with the initiatives of the Ministry of Culture, the missing parts were brought In 2000 and the mosaic was put on display following the restoration. Those two eternal lovers, who were torn apart by traffickers of historical artefacts and kidnapped separately, have been unified after years.
  • Roman mosaics - Metiochus and Parthenope Mosaic.  2nd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Metiochus and Parthenope, famous with their legendary love for eat: torn apart and then unified after years, they seem to represent the According to the myth, Parthenope is the sister of Polycrat e Ki taken an oath of virginity upon the Heraion which symbolizes the Metiochus is invited to the royal court and meets Parthenope Burin fails in love with Metiochus but in order to keep the oath she has taken, she and chooses to go exile. In this mosaic, we see the two figures sfttngsitting upon an In compliance with the story, the face of Metiochus is directed towards Part e whom he fell in love and the eyes of Parthenope stares at an indeterminate area due to the love she feels yet sees impossible. The mosaic is surrounded by triangular, double mesh ttke, and pyramidal borders. The piece was discovered during the rescue excavation conducted. in 1993. When exposed, it was understood that the main figures used to be at the middle of the mosaic were stolen the tomb-robbers. <br />
<br />
The mosaic was brought to Gaziantep Museum with a question mark labeled on it saying "Who knows where? In which country?" and began to be displayed temporarily after restoration. From the photographs sent by the Canadian Archaeologist Sheila Campbell, it was found out that the stolen parts were in the Merin collection in Houston USA and with the initiatives of the Ministry of Culture, the missing parts were brought In 2000 and the mosaic was put on display following the restoration. Those two eternal lovers, who were torn apart by traffickers of historical artefacts and kidnapped separately, have been unified after years.
  • Roman mosaics - Metiochus and Parthenope Mosaic.  2nd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Metiochus and Parthenope, famous with their legendary love for eat: torn apart and then unified after years, they seem to represent the According to the myth, Parthenope is the sister of Polycrat e Ki taken an oath of virginity upon the Heraion which symbolizes the Metiochus is invited to the royal court and meets Parthenope Burin fails in love with Metiochus but in order to keep the oath she has taken, she and chooses to go exile. In this mosaic, we see the two figures sfttngsitting upon an In compliance with the story, the face of Metiochus is directed towards Part e whom he fell in love and the eyes of Parthenope stares at an indeterminate area due to the love she feels yet sees impossible. The mosaic is surrounded by triangular, double mesh ttke, and pyramidal borders. The piece was discovered during the rescue excavation conducted. in 1993. When exposed, it was understood that the main figures used to be at the middle of the mosaic were stolen the tomb-robbers. <br />
<br />
The mosaic was brought to Gaziantep Museum with a question mark labeled on it saying "Who knows where? In which country?" and began to be displayed temporarily after restoration. From the photographs sent by the Canadian Archaeologist Sheila Campbell, it was found out that the stolen parts were in the Merin collection in Houston USA and with the initiatives of the Ministry of Culture, the missing parts were brought In 2000 and the mosaic was put on display following the restoration. Those two eternal lovers, who were torn apart by traffickers of historical artefacts and kidnapped separately, have been unified after years.
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Picture and image of the Neo Gothic Erba stone tomb sculpture of a female figure, with her eyes closed and some poppy seeds in her hands, which are a pagan symbol with a funeral meaning because of their narcotic properties. The garment, stretching along her arm, leaves one shoulder undressed, thus giving the sleeper a touch of sensuality that did not fail to arouse some controversy among the contemporaries. By Sculptor Sculptor S. Saccomanno 1883.  Section A, no 50, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the Neo Gothic Erba stone tomb sculpture of a female figure, with her eyes closed and some poppy seeds in her hands, which are a pagan symbol with a funeral meaning because of their narcotic properties. The garment, stretching along her arm, leaves one shoulder undressed, thus giving the sleeper a touch of sensuality that did not fail to arouse some controversy among the contemporaries. By Sculptor Sculptor S. Saccomanno 1883.  Section A, no 50, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.

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