• The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • 5th century Eastern Roman Byzantine  funerary mosaic from Tarbaka in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis , present day Tunisia, with a crown at the top probably a Christogram  (Latin Monogramma Christi ) is a monogram used as an abbreviation for the name of Jesus Christ, with a figure below and a latin text for the deceased " Covuldeus in peace". Either side of the figure are a lit candle which symbolises eternal faith. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis Tunisia.<br />
<br />
Christian burial grounds The ingenuity and expertise of mosaic schools, particularly those operating in Proconsular Africa and By-zacena, led to the dissemination of a mosaic trend which was very well tailored to the needs of a Christian clientele, who was authorised by the Church to use the basilica area and its ancillaries for burial, particularly in the sacred spaces such as the baptistery and the choir.
  • 5th century Eastern Roman Byzantine   funerary mosaic from Tarbaka in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis , present day Tunisia, with a crown at the top probably a Christogram  (Latin Monogramma Christi ) is a monogram used as an abbreviation for the name of Jesus Christ, with a figure below and a latin text for the deceased " Covuldeus in peace". Either side of the figure are a lit candle which symbolises eternal faith. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis Tunisia.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Christian burial grounds The ingenuity and expertise of mosaic schools, particularly those operating in Proconsular Africa and By-zacena, led to the dissemination of a mosaic trend which was very well tailored to the needs of a Christian clientele, who was authorised by the Church to use the basilica area and its ancillaries for burial, particularly in the sacred spaces such as the baptistery and the choir.
  • 5th century AD Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian  funerary mosaic of Crescentia from Tharbarka western Necropolis in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis, present day Tunisia. The funerary portrait depicts a young girl, Crescentia, dressed in a dalmatic tunic with vertical stripes, pulled in at the waist by a belt , with a necklace around her neck. Today the dalmatic is a long wide-sleeved tunic, which still serves as a liturgical vestment in the Roman Catholic church. To the right side of Crescentia is a lit candle which symbolises eternal faith. <br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 5th century Eastern Roman Byzantine  funerary mosaic from Tarbaka in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis , present day Tunisia, with a crown at the top probably a Christogram  (Latin Monogramma Christi ) is a monogram used as an abbreviation for the name of Jesus Christ, with a figure below and a latin text for the deceased " Covuldeus in peace". Either side of the figure are a lit candle which symbolises eternal faith. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis Tunisia.<br />
<br />
Christian burial grounds The ingenuity and expertise of mosaic schools, particularly those operating in Proconsular Africa and By-zacena, led to the dissemination of a mosaic trend which was very well tailored to the needs of a Christian clientele, who was authorised by the Church to use the basilica area and its ancillaries for burial, particularly in the sacred spaces such as the baptistery and the choir.
  • 5th century Eastern Roman Byzantine  funerary mosaic from Tarbaka in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis , present day Tunisia, with a crown at the top probably a Christogram  (Latin Monogramma Christi ) is a monogram used as an abbreviation for the name of Jesus Christ, with a figure below and a latin text for the deceased " Covuldeus in peace". Either side of the figure are a lit candle which symbolises eternal faith. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis Tunisia.   Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Christian burial grounds The ingenuity and expertise of mosaic schools, particularly those operating in Proconsular Africa and By-zacena, led to the dissemination of a mosaic trend which was very well tailored to the needs of a Christian clientele, who was authorised by the Church to use the basilica area and its ancillaries for burial, particularly in the sacred spaces such as the baptistery and the choir.
  • 5th century Eastern Roman Byzantine  funerary mosaic from Tarbaka in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis , present day Tunisia, with a crown at the top probably a Christogram  (Latin Monogramma Christi ) is a monogram used as an abbreviation for the name of Jesus Christ, with a figure below and a latin text for the deceased " Covuldeus in peace". Either side of the figure are a lit candle which symbolises eternal faith. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis Tunisia. Against a grey art background.<br />
<br />
Christian burial grounds The ingenuity and expertise of mosaic schools, particularly those operating in Proconsular Africa and By-zacena, led to the dissemination of a mosaic trend which was very well tailored to the needs of a Christian clientele, who was authorised by the Church to use the basilica area and its ancillaries for burial, particularly in the sacred spaces such as the baptistery and the choir.
  • Eastern Roman Byzantine walk in baptismal font from the 6th century AD Parish Church of Demna near Kalibia, Cape Bon, Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The baptismal font was removed from the church and restored in the Bardo Museum Tunis in 1955. <br />
<br />
The mosaic iconographic decorations represent the salvation of the neophyte, newcomer, who by being baptised is admitted into the Church of Christ whilst being illuminated by faith, represented the mosaic lit candle illustrations.<br />
<br />
The P with a cross through it is the Chi Rho, a Christian symbol which represent the first two letters of Jesus Christ's name in Greek. The Christogram also has the Greek letters Alpha and Omega which represent the passage from the book of revelations: “I am the Alpha and Omega" Chapter 1 verse 8, which is clarified by "the beginning and the end" (Revelation 21:6, 22:13). <br />
<br />
In these type of baptismal fonts those being baptised would have been fully immersed in water as John the Baptist immersed Jesus. <br />
<br />
The font was paid for by donation by Iuliana and Aquinius who dedicated the font to St Cyprian, the martyed Bishop of Carthage, circa 258,  and the author of a treatise on baptism rites<br />
<br />
The Bardo Museum Tunis
  • Eastern Roman Byzantine walk in baptismal font from the 6th century AD Parish Church of Demna near Kalibia, Cape Bon, Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The baptismal font was removed from the church and restored in the Bardo Museum Tunis in 1955. <br />
<br />
The mosaic iconographic decorations represent the salvation of the neophyte, newcomer, who by being baptised is admitted into the Church of Christ whilst being illuminated by faith, represented the mosaic lit candle illustrations.<br />
<br />
The P with a cross through it is the Chi Rho, a Christian symbol which represent the first two letters of Jesus Christ's name in Greek. The Christogram also has the Greek letters Alpha and Omega which represent the passage from the book of revelations: “I am the Alpha and Omega" Chapter 1 verse 8, which is clarified by "the beginning and the end" (Revelation 21:6, 22:13). <br />
<br />
In these type of baptismal fonts those being baptised would have been fully immersed in water as John the Baptist immersed Jesus. <br />
<br />
The font was paid for by donation by Iuliana and Aquinius who dedicated the font to St Cyprian, the martyed Bishop of Carthage, circa 258,  and the author of a treatise on baptism rites<br />
<br />
The Bardo Museum Tunis
  • Eastern Roman Byzantine walk in baptismal font from the 6th century AD Parish Church of Demna near Kalibia, Cape Bon, Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The baptismal font was removed from the church and restored in the Bardo Museum Tunis in 1955. <br />
<br />
The mosaic iconographic decorations represent the salvation of the neophyte, newcomer, who by being baptised is admitted into the Church of Christ whilst being illuminated by faith, represented the mosaic lit candle illustrations.<br />
<br />
The P with a cross through it is the Chi Rho, a Christian symbol which represent the first two letters of Jesus Christ's name in Greek. The Christogram also has the Greek letters Alpha and Omega which represent the passage from the book of revelations: “I am the Alpha and Omega" Chapter 1 verse 8, which is clarified by "the beginning and the end" (Revelation 21:6, 22:13). <br />
<br />
In these type of baptismal fonts those being baptised would have been fully immersed in water as John the Baptist immersed Jesus. <br />
<br />
The font was paid for by donation by Iuliana and Aquinius who dedicated the font to St Cyprian, the martyed Bishop of Carthage, circa 258,  and the author of a treatise on baptism rites<br />
<br />
The Bardo Museum Tunis
  • Eastern Roman Byzantine walk in baptismal font from the 6th century AD Parish Church of Demna near Kalibia, Cape Bon, Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The baptismal font was removed from the church and restored in the Bardo Museum Tunis in 1955. <br />
<br />
The mosaic iconographic decorations represent the salvation of the neophyte, newcomer, who by being baptised is admitted into the Church of Christ whilst being illuminated by faith, represented the mosaic lit candle illustrations.<br />
<br />
The P with a cross through it is the Chi Rho, a Christian symbol which represent the first two letters of Jesus Christ's name in Greek. The Christogram also has the Greek letters Alpha and Omega which represent the passage from the book of revelations: “I am the Alpha and Omega" Chapter 1 verse 8, which is clarified by "the beginning and the end" (Revelation 21:6, 22:13). <br />
<br />
In these type of baptismal fonts those being baptised would have been fully immersed in water as John the Baptist immersed Jesus. <br />
<br />
The font was paid for by donation by Iuliana and Aquinius who dedicated the font to St Cyprian, the martyed Bishop of Carthage, circa 258,  and the author of a treatise on baptism rites<br />
<br />
The Bardo Museum Tunis
  • Christian funerary Mosaic depicting the fountain of life which was a early Christian ssymbol of Christian faith. This early Christian mosaic is from Basilica of Furnos Minus, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Christian funerary Mosaic depicting the fountain of life which was a early Christian ssymbol of Christian faith. This early Christian mosaic is from Basilica of Furnos Minus, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Christian funerary Mosaic depicting the fountain of life which was a early Christian ssymbol of Christian faith. This early Christian mosaic is from Basilica of Furnos Minus, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Christian funerary Mosaic depicting the fountain of life which was a early Christian ssymbol of Christian faith. This early Christian mosaic is from Basilica of Furnos Minus, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Christian funerary Mosaic depicting the fountain of life which was a early Christian ssymbol of Christian faith. This early Christian mosaic is from Basilica of Furnos Minus, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 6th century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian mosaic of the mosaic of the Most Holy Sepulchre and the memorial of Golgotha in Jerusalem .<br />
<br />
In the foreground is the dome of Golgotha, erected at the site of the crucifixion ofJesus Christ, from where  the four rivers of Paradise flow: the Geon = Gihon, the Fison = Pishon, the Tigris and Euphrates, symbolically referring to the Word (the four gospels). Sheep, representing the faithfuls, are drinking from the rivers. In the background are depictions of the the Holy Sepulchre with its door ajar, and two other buildings, symbolising Bethlehem and Jerusalem. <br />
<br />
From the threshold of the martyrdom erected in honour of Jesus Christ at the church of Iunca - Younga (in present the day region of Mahres in Tunisia). The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian mosaic of the mosaic of the Most Holy Sepulchre and the memorial of Golgotha in Jerusalem .<br />
<br />
In the foreground is the dome of Golgotha, erected at the site of the crucifixion ofJesus Christ, from where  the four rivers of Paradise flow: the Geon = Gihon, the Fison = Pishon, the Tigris and Euphrates, symbolically referring to the Word (the four gospels). Sheep, representing the faithfuls, are drinking from the rivers. In the background are depictions of the the Holy Sepulchre with its door ajar, and two other buildings, symbolising Bethlehem and Jerusalem. <br />
<br />
From the threshold of the martyrdom erected in honour of Jesus Christ at the church of Iunca - Younga (in present the day region of Mahres in Tunisia). The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian mosaic of the mosaic of the Most Holy Sepulchre and the memorial of Golgotha in Jerusalem .<br />
<br />
In the foreground is the dome of Golgotha, erected at the site of the crucifixion ofJesus Christ, from where  the four rivers of Paradise flow: the Geon = Gihon, the Fison = Pishon, the Tigris and Euphrates, symbolically referring to the Word (the four gospels). Sheep, representing the faithfuls, are drinking from the rivers. In the background are depictions of the the Holy Sepulchre with its door ajar, and two other buildings, symbolising Bethlehem and Jerusalem. <br />
<br />
From the threshold of the martyrdom erected in honour of Jesus Christ at the church of Iunca - Younga (in present the day region of Mahres in Tunisia). The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian mosaic of the mosaic of the Most Holy Sepulchre and the memorial of Golgotha in Jerusalem .<br />
<br />
In the foreground is the dome of Golgotha, erected at the site of the crucifixion ofJesus Christ, from where  the four rivers of Paradise flow: the Geon = Gihon, the Fison = Pishon, the Tigris and Euphrates, symbolically referring to the Word (the four gospels). Sheep, representing the faithfuls, are drinking from the rivers. In the background are depictions of the the Holy Sepulchre with its door ajar, and two other buildings, symbolising Bethlehem and Jerusalem. <br />
<br />
From the threshold of the martyrdom erected in honour of Jesus Christ at the church of Iunca - Younga (in present the day region of Mahres in Tunisia). The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 6th century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian mosaic of the mosaic of the Most Holy Sepulchre and the memorial of Golgotha in Jerusalem .<br />
<br />
In the foreground is the dome of Golgotha, erected at the site of the crucifixion ofJesus Christ, from where  the four rivers of Paradise flow: the Geon = Gihon, the Fison = Pishon, the Tigris and Euphrates, symbolically referring to the Word (the four gospels). Sheep, representing the faithfuls, are drinking from the rivers. In the background are depictions of the the Holy Sepulchre with its door ajar, and two other buildings, symbolising Bethlehem and Jerusalem. <br />
<br />
From the threshold of the martyrdom erected in honour of Jesus Christ at the church of Iunca - Younga (in present the day region of Mahres in Tunisia). The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic of Matziceus, a Libyan, with the inscription reading: ‘the faithful Matziceus lived in peace for 42 years, rested (died) on the fifteenth of the calends of June’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with vines which grow out of a cantharus, a Greek style drinking cup, which represents the fountain of life.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the Parish church of Demna, left AisleBardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic of Matziceus, a Libyan, with the inscription reading: ‘the faithful Matziceus lived in peace for 42 years, rested (died) on the fifteenth of the calends of June’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with vines which grow out of a cantharus, a Greek style drinking cup, which represents the fountain of life.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the Parish church of Demna, left AisleBardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic of Matziceus, a Libyan, with the inscription reading: ‘the faithful Matziceus lived in peace for 42 years, rested (died) on the fifteenth of the calends of June’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with vines which grow out of a cantharus, a Greek style drinking cup, which represents the fountain of life.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the Parish church of Demna, left AisleBardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic of Matziceus, a Libyan, with the inscription reading: ‘the faithful Matziceus lived in peace for 42 years, rested (died) on the fifteenth of the calends of June’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with vines which grow out of a cantharus, a Greek style drinking cup, which represents the fountain of life.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the Parish church of Demna, left AisleBardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • Christian funerary Mosaic of Matziceus who was from Libyia and this funerary mosaic reads, ‘ the faithful Matziceus lived in peace for 42 years, rested on the fifteenth of the calends of June’. The mosaic depicts two tendrils of vine thrusting out of a cantharus with peacocks & birds. This early Christian mosaic is from Demna Parish Church, left aisle, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Christian funerary Mosaic of Matziceus who was from Libyia and this funerary mosaic reads, ‘ the faithful Matziceus lived in peace for 42 years, rested on the fifteenth of the calends of June’. The mosaic depicts two tendrils of vine thrusting out of a cantharus with peacocks & birds. This early Christian mosaic is from Demna Parish Church, left aisle, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Discus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Discus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy

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